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Lotsa Questions!

Keeni84

先輩
25 Oct 2003
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I have a lot of questions, guys, so please bear with me!!!

When using adverbs like ときどき and よくcould you ever put the sentence like this:

わたしはよく映画へ行きます。or, could you put the sentence like this:

よく、わたしは映画へ行きます。

I guess what I'm trying to ask is---can the adverb be "flexible" in a sentence, or does it have to go straight after the は?

Also, could you put:

わたしはよく映画に行きます instead of using "へ"

Also, in this sentence, why would you use に? (instead of を)

バスに乗りました。

but in this sentence use を instead of に

道を歩きます。

Isn't に supposed to mean "in" (or like a definite time marker)?


ありがとうございます!!!
 
わたしはよく映画へ行きます。or, could you put the sentence like this:

よく、わたしは映画へ行きます。
Time needs to come after the subject (わたしは), using よく there will be read as something different then a phrase expressing time.

わたしはよく映画に行きます instead of using "へ"
Yes, you could also use に in this sentence.
を shows that an action is done by something to something.
Example:
私は本を読みます (I read a book) - The book is the direct object of the verb(読む), therefore it read.
に can mean many things: to, for, in, at, etc. The sentence you posted means "I often go to the movies". Using を wouldn't make sense. When you're not sure about which particle to use, think of what it would mean in English.

バスに乗りました。
You rode on/in the bus, therefore に must be used. This is also how it makes sense in English.

道を歩きます
I'm not sure about this...I would also use に for this. With に it means "(It) walks on the street".

Just for clarity, some examples of particle usage.
家に帰る - (It) returns home
家へ帰る - (It) returns home
車に乗りました - (It) rode in the car
私友達に手紙を書きました - I wrote a letter to a friend.
六時に映画を見ました - At 6'o clock I saw a movie.

Those are the main ways the particle に is used. By expressing in, to, at, definite timem etc. You can also see the particle を being used for verbs. Here are more examples of this particle:

サッカーをします - To play soccer
ファミコンをします - To play video games
日本語の勉強をします - To study Japanese
水を飲みます - To drink water

These are all action as you can see.

Hope I've been of some help. :)
 
Originally posted by SacredBlue

I'm not sure about this...I would also use に for this. With に it means "(It) walks on the street".
If you want to say I will walk on the street you need to use "wo," to the street is "ni." Analogous to walking in the park "公園を散歩する"or swimming the length of a river "川を泳ぎます。"
 
ありがとうございます!!!

However...I still have a question...

You said that you use を for verbs...but would you use を for like this...

大学を行きます

or would you use に because it is like "going to"? I think you would use に but I suppose I am still a little confused. 大学 is the direct object, right?

I think I understand what you guys are saying about changing the meaning. に and を could be used in the same sentence, and be correct, but it would make the sentence have a different meaning.

I don't mean to be a bother, but can you please explain to me the difference between these two sentences:

レストランのハンバーガーを食べました。

and

レストランでハンバーガーを食べました。


Okay, thank you guys!! 日本語は難しいですね!

PS Is "うそ"a "bad" word? My teacher told me it's like saying
"すごい"but my friend told me that it's like saying "Damn". Thanks!!!! He he!!
 
Originally posted by Keeni84
ありがとうございます!!!

However...I still have a question...

You said that you use を for verbs...but would you use を for like this...

大学を行きます

or would you use に because it is like "going to"? I think you would use に but I suppose I am still a little confused. 大学 is the direct object, right?
If you could put some of what you're trying to say in English it would help. ;) Do you want to say attend a college or physically go there? In either case, Daigaku is the indirect object, unless you're trying to say the college is what is going. In which case it becomes the subject. Iku and kuru and some others never take "wo" directly because going and coming are indirect to and from actions, not a direct consequence of the destination itself.


レストランのハンバーガーを食べました。

and

レストランでハンバーガーを食べました。
The first you literally ate the restaurant's hamburger (anywhere) and the second you ate a hamburger at the restaurant, presumably but not necessarily one you got there. You could also combine them
レストランでのハンバーガーを食べました to make both of these meanings clear, it just sounds a little funny the same as it would in English. :)
 
Ha ha ha...Sorry!!!

大学に行きます。。。I go to the University (not attending)
大学を行きます。。。incorrect!

Okay, I was trying to say "I go to the University". (like I am actively GOING to the University)

I think my problem was that I was confused with the indirect object and direct object and subject. Gosh, I'm so bad with grammar, but learning Japanese seems to be helping!!!


Sorry that I'm being so confusing!!! You both have been so much help!

ありがとうございます!
 
Originally posted by Keeni84
Ha ha ha...Sorry!!!

大学に行きます。。。I go to the University (not attending)
大学を行きます。。。incorrect!
正ですです。(Correct). 👍 . Although if you specify in the sentence that you go on a regular basis like every day or week you'd probably use "行っています." Ikimasu is like "am going" now or "will go."

And it is either

大学に行きます or
大学へ行きます


Also when you eventually do want to attend, another verb is better, but at least you can still use "ni." :D
 
Well, since I am in University, so I guess I should learn the verb for "attend". How would you say, "I attend University".

Thanks! :)
 
Originally posted by Keeni84
Well, since I am in University, so I guess I should learn the verb for "attend". How would you say, "I attend University".

Thanks!

I think the verb 'kayou'
通う 【かよう】 (v5u) (1) to go back and forth; to ply between; (2) to commute; to attend (school, church, etc.); (P)
is probably the one you want.
日本では小学校と中学校に通うことは義務となっている 。
In Japan, attendance at elementary and junior high school is compulsory.
 
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