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Life expectency

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thomas

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Japan tops life expectancy in WHO report

GENEVA 窶 Japan tops the world in life expectancy with 81.4 years on average, 77.9 years for men and 84.7 years for women, the World Health Organization (WHO) said in an annual report released Wednesday.

The organization said Japan also leads the world in terms of "healthy life expectancy," representing the average number of healthy years in a person's life, with 73.6 years for both sexes. Australia and five European countries, including Austria, Switzerland and Sweden, follow closely behind Japan, all with over 80 years of life expectancy.


=> http://www.japantoday.com/e/?content=news&cat=1&id=236677

More info

=> http://www.who.int/whr/2002/overview/en/
 

Maciamo

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Do the healthy years take mental health and quality of life into account or just the total number of days you are not sick (and still a cold or pneunomia is quite different). I ask this because Japan is reputedly a country of hard wokers and possibly have the highest level of "karoushi" (overwork death).

I understand that Japanese people are less often sick than, let's say Nothern Europeans, because the climate is much milder and people try hard to prevent virus spreading, eg. by wearing a mask when they are ill. I am amazed that we still have 21 degree in Tokyo in November. Last week, we had 26 degrees with blue sky every odd day (and cold rainy days the other ones). Basically, Japanese autumn is very much like English summer and warmer than the Norwegian and Finnish one.
 
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thomas

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I think they refer to "healthy" as "not being sick". Indeed, it would be interesting to know if that also includes mental health. The WHO site offers such as abundance of info, I was hesitant to dig any further.

I'm wondering how "karoushi" can be explained in medical terms? Just exhaustation?

I understand that Japanese people are less often sick than, let's say Nothern Europeans, because the climate is much milder and people try hard to prevent virus spreading, eg. by wearing a mask when they are ill.
Mild weather actually helps to spread virii much faster. I have the impression that Japanese resort to anti-biotical treatment too easily, do you share this view? While anti-biotics are ineffective against virii they seem to be employed at the slightest sign of influenza.
 

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Recently, I've been given anti-biotics to treat colds. I get like 5 days worth. Hmm, my Doctor is trying to kill me I think. So, I put aside 3 days worth for when ever I'm sick and save myself a trip to the hospital.

@ karoushi
Hmm, how about "death by over work and exhaustion"? It's a pretty interesting syndrome since I'm sure there have to be more to than just falling literally over. I bet stress causes too much strain on the heart and the heart basically just gives out.
 
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thomas

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Overwork-related deaths, illnesses rise

"The number of deaths and illnesses resulting from overwork and other work-related factors grew at a faster pace in the first half of fiscal 2002, which began in April, from a year earlier, according to preliminary government figures released Tuesday."

=> http://www.japantoday.com/e/?content=news&cat=1&id=237313
 

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Good grief, do they really give antibiotics for colds and flu? What are they thinking? It would be completely ineffective and in the long run would only hurt the population as the widespread use of antibiotics eventually leads to resistant strains of bacteria that are immune to treatment. Do the doctors really not know any better? It is very irresponsible of them if they do.
 

moyashi

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I wonder.

They give me the wrong amount all the time. They forget that i'm like 20 kilos heavier than most Japanese.

What scares me is the amount of days -- 5! I thought antibiotics are only safe for 3!
 
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thomas

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I was told that it's important to take antibiotics for a period of at least 6-8 days to take effect. Hm, perhaps doctors pay tribute to Japanese working life: send them salarymen back to their kaisha as fast as possible.
 

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