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wizcoder

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Hi, It's been about a few months and i'm more than Halfway through the Genki book and Im here to ask you for some resources to challenge what I know.

In example websites that would give quizs on what I know so far.

What i've done:
- Added all the vocabulary to Anki and tested my self to see how much I know and out of 329 I only forgot 15 of them which I already reviewed again and now I remember what those were, I've done this test multiples times to see how accurate I am.
- Reviewed my grammar

What I want:
- Somewhere to further improve with the particles that I know which are "mo", "to", "ne", "yo", "ha", "he", "no", "wo", "de".
- I also need to improve on when to use い- adjectives, な-adjectives, and Present Affirmative, Past Negative, Past Affirmative and Past Negative.


So yeah where can I find some helpful places to improve on this, I understand the stuff but I want to see how much I truly understand of it? understand?

I'm now moving onto the next lesson I just learned it's vocabulary so it'll bring me to the next grammar lesson.

Thanks
 

wizcoder

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NVM, I did some researching and I found everything I needed to practice such as tests etc, lmao sorry about the post!
 

Mike Cash

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NVM, I did some researching and I found everything I needed to practice such as tests etc, lmao sorry about the post!
Then you could at least post what you found, as it might be of benefit to others in the same circumstances. 減るもんじゃない, as the saying goes.
 

wizcoder

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The main site for Grammar, Hiragana, Katakana and Kanji: http://genki.japantimes.co.jp/self_en But if your like me and want everything direct I took the time to sort what I felt was useful to me.

Hiragana Chart: http://genki.japantimes.co.jp/site/self/site/hiragana/hiragana.html
Katakana Chart: http://genki.japantimes.co.jp/site/self/site/gakusyu/katakana.html

Memorizing Hiragana: http://genki.japantimes.co.jp/site/self/site/js/hiragana1.htm | http://genki.japantimes.co.jp/site/self/site/js/hiragana2.htm | http://genki.japantimes.co.jp/site/self/site/js/hiragana3.htm
Memorizing Katakana: http://genki.japantimes.co.jp/site/self/site/js/katakana1.htm | http://genki.japantimes.co.jp/site/self/site/js/katakana2.htm | http://genki.japantimes.co.jp/site/self/site/js/katakana3.htm

Listening Comprehension Hiragana: http://genki.japantimes.co.jp/site/self/site/gakusyu/hiragana2.html
Listening Comprehension Katakana: http://genki.japantimes.co.jp/site/self/site/gakusyu/katakana2.html

Verb/Adjective Conjugation Practice: http://genki.japantimes.co.jp/self/verbadjective-conjugation-practice

Particles Quiz: http://www.all.umn.edu/japanese_language/class_materials/particle_exercise/index.html

------- Other essentials I used and have helped me up to even today -------
Remembering Hiragana Game: http://www.csus.edu/indiv/s/sheaa/projects/genki/hiragana-timer.html
Remembering Katakana Game: http://www.csus.edu/indiv/s/sheaa/projects/genki/katakana-timer.html

Listening Comprehension Quiz: http://mykikitori.com/

Use this site as a addon to your current studying but not as a primary: https://www.erin.ne.jp/en/joinmember.php , I feel as it's great with the video lessons, grammar review, quiz's and so much more..

For remembering vocabulary I suggest adding each new vocab list to Anki then reviewing the words every day till it's completely in your head.

Hope this is useful to others as you have resources right in 1 place.
 
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Mike Cash

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Good man! That's the way to help others when you can.
 

MRubingh

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- Somewhere to further improve with the particles that I know which are "mo", "to", "ne", "yo", "ha", "he", "no", "wo", "de".
- I also need to improve on when to use い- adjectives, な-adjectives, and Present Affirmative, Past Negative, Past Affirmative and Past Negative.
Hi Wizcoder and all,

I've been a "beginner"-level student of Japanese myself for a long time now,
and I discovered the following only very recently:

1) http://www.guidetojapanese.org/learn/grammar

A very excellent book on Japanese Grammar, by Tae Kim (available free
online). He treats Japanese grammar from the Japanese point of view,
not from the point of view of the grammar of Western-European languages.
Very highly recommended, and it seems relevant to your questions on the
particles and on the i/na-adjectives and on the verb forms/conjugations.
I wish I had known of this book earlier.

2) http://tangorin.com/handbook

A page containing a collection of sensible-looking links to resources for
learning Japanese. This is how I found the Tae Kim book.

Good luck,
With best regards,

Menno ( メンノー )
 

MRubingh

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減るもんじゃない, as the saying goes.
Hello Mike Cash さん,

This is off-topic, picking up on that Japanese phrase you used. Googling it or looking it up in "Jim Breen's WWWJDIC" finds the translation

"it's no big deal;
it's nothing to fret about;
it's not like it's the end of the world".

But it's not obvious (to me as a beginner) how that meaning is arrived at from the actual words, seeing that the dictionaries translate "減る" as "to decrease (in size or number); to diminish; to abate".

From the position of "もん", one guess is that "もん" is a noun, which would likely make "減る" an adverbial modifier to that noun, leading me to guess at a literal meaning like "there is no such thing as a decreasing もん". Where the "もん" could be a number of homophones, such as 問 ("there's no such thing as a stupid question"??), 物, 門.

There seems also to exist a particle "もん", "used as a conjunction or at sentence-end, often as 〜もの
な, 〜ものね) indicates reason or excuse", but that doesn't seem to fit.

Obviously, sayings in any language are often set phrases that are difficult to translate and often using archaic words or grammar. But is there any way to understand how the meaning "it's no big deal" can be "construed" from (related to) the actual words in the Japanese phrase ?

Don't bother replying if it's too much a trivial or a beginner's question (which I'm sure it is), or when it's too much off-topic.

With best regards, and thanks for your many helpful posts on this forum,

Menno ( メンノー ) currently in Germany
 

nekojita

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もん = もの (this is a quite common sound change). Literally "(the thing we're talking about = もの) is not something that will be diminished (by doing whatever it is we're talking about)". In this case, sharing a website doesn't make it any less accessible to you, so there's no reason not to share.
 

MRubingh

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もん = もの (this is a quite common sound change). Literally "(the thing we're talking about = もの) is not something that will be diminished (by doing whatever it is we're talking about)". In this case, sharing a website doesn't make it any less accessible to you, so there's no reason not to share.
Hello Nekojita さん,

Thank you for your reply, and many thanks to you for running this forum !

Seeing that the topic of analyzing the expression 「減るもんじゃない」 is now in danger of growing bigger than the original topic of this thread, I've taken the liberty to create a new thread to continue the discussion on the topic 「減るもんじゃない」 there. The new thread is:

https://jref.com/threads/the-expression-「減るもんじゃない」.55765/

In that new thread, I'll reply to your helpful posting presently.

Thanks and with best regards,

Menno ( メンノー )
 

MRubingh

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Hello Nice Gaijin さん, thanks for the "like" in the other thread.

I've always recommended the Genki textbooks
I've heard the "Genki" textbooks mentioned more than once.

I'm looking for more material on the GRAMMAR of Japanese. What I mean is, not a book that merely gives prescriptions like "if you want to express this or that meaning in Japanese, then use this or that construction". What I mean is a sort of "scientific" investigation into how the "bones" of Japanese grammar work, i.e. from a linguistic perspective if you will. Specific questions that I seek answers to include: The backgrounds of the similarity in grammatical roles of adjectives and verbs, and the exact meaning and "etymology" of the "copula" forms like だ and な.

To which degree do the Genki books dig into these kinds of questions? Would you (or anyone) know of a good book that addresses this type of questions? Elsewhere, I've seen mentioned the book Yoko M. McCain, _Handbook of Modern Japanese Grammar_; is there anyone here who has seen that book and can tell me whether that book digs into the sort of "linguistic" questions I have?

Thanks & with best regards,
Menno ( メンノー )
 

Mike Cash

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I have the book you ask about and would highly recommend it for people seriously wishing to study Japanese as a language they will actually be called upon to use in real life. I think it may be of somewhat less use for someone primarily interested in comparative linguistics.

Is it even still in print?
 

Toritoribe

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The backgrounds of the similarity in grammatical roles of adjectives and verbs, and the exact meaning and "etymology" of the "copula" forms like だ and な.
You can find the explanations by searching in this forum. I remember I or maybe our veteran member Glenn-san have posted about those topics several times.
 
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