What's new

Welcome to Japan Reference (JREF) - the community for all Things Japanese.

Join Today! It is fast, simple, and FREE!

Learn Japanese with JapanesePod101.com

Japanese studies & reading comprehension

Sciurus

後輩
Joined
12 Mar 2017
Messages
20
Reaction score
0
I'm having trouble with understanding the following exchange.

Context: mother talks to son about dinner.

夕飯何がいい?
- 何でもいいよ
何でもいいのね じゃあ。。。
ウナギと牡蠣にすっぽん レバーあと。。。
- (son's thoughts) あぁ今月の食費が。。。
- なんて冗談よ。。。

So far I've got:

What do you want for dinner?
- Anything's fine.
Anything, you say? Well then...
(most confusing part, something about eels, oysters and turtles. I have no idea what レバーあと means)
- This month's food expenses... (don't really get what the omitted ending should be)
- What's with that joke... (I don't get the joke :()

Any help is appreciated.
 
Joined
5 May 2013
Messages
880
Reaction score
357
(most confusing part, something about eels, oysters and turtles. I have no idea what レバーあと means)

ウナギと牡蠣にすっぽん レバーあと。。。
It's just a list of what's for dinner. あと is used in lists like this as a pause word before adding to the list, like 'and also'.
It could be 'eel, oysters, and liver of soft shelled turtle' or 'eel, oysters, soft-shelled turtle, and liver', depending on whether it's a comma or a の that is omitted between them. I'm going to go with the latter as making more sense in this list. (That is to say, I don't think that the liver of soft-shelled turtles is ever eaten separately, not that I've eaten soft-shelled turtle, but... they aren't very big and they aren't a very fatty animal so their livers are probably not especially good.)

- This month's food expenses... (don't really get what the omitted ending should be)
Well, that's a long and expensive-sounding list of luxury foods, so just apply logic to the context.

- What's with that joke... (I don't get the joke :()
That's the son's line or the mother's? Either way it means basically "What a joke!" but you interpret it more as "You've got to be joking" if the son says it and "Just kidding!" if the mother says it.
 

Toritoribe

松葉解禁
Moderator
Joined
22 Feb 2008
Messages
17,721
Reaction score
3,930
Yes, it's すっぽん、レバー. If it means "the liver of soft-shelled turtles", すっぽんの肝 must be used instead of すっぽんのレバー.

The last line is mother's, judging from "-" at the top of the line and the female language 冗談よ (not 冗談だよ).

何でもいいのね じゃあ。。。
Anything, you say? Well then...
Did you interpret いい as 言い, maybe? If so, it's 良い.
 
Joined
5 May 2013
Messages
880
Reaction score
357
Yes, it's すっぽん、レバー. If it means "the liver of soft-shelled turtles", すっぽんの肝 must be used instead of すっぽんのレバー.

The last line is mother's, judging from "-" at the top of the line and the female language 冗談よ (not 冗談だよ).


Did you interpret いい as 言い, maybe? If so, it's 良い.
なるほど。 I didn't realize you had to use that phrasing. (Well maybe not that *exact* phrasing since I still don't think people eat turtle livers separately, but maybe カモの肝 or something.)

勉強になりました。ありがとう!
 

Toritoribe

松葉解禁
Moderator
Joined
22 Feb 2008
Messages
17,721
Reaction score
3,930
Well maybe not that *exact* phrasing since I still don't think people eat turtle livers separately, but maybe カモの肝 or something.
カモのレバー would be acceptable. I think the difference is by whether the liver has been traditionally used in Japanese cuisine or not, just like アンコウのレバー sounds odd.
 
Joined
5 May 2013
Messages
880
Reaction score
357
カモのレバー would be acceptable. I think the difference is by whether the liver has been traditionally used in Japanese cuisine or not, just like アンコウのレバー sounds odd.
Ahhh, that's more in line with what I originally thought (that レバー was liver as food and 肝 was liver as an organ), but slightly subtler.
Thanks!
 

Toritoribe

松葉解禁
Moderator
Joined
22 Feb 2008
Messages
17,721
Reaction score
3,930
レバー and 肝 are both basically for food. 肝臓 is mostly used for an organ. As for the liver as food, the size is not a problem. Even the liver of eel is eaten separately.;)

spit‐roasted eel livers
25gz3w1.jpg
 

Sciurus

後輩
Joined
12 Mar 2017
Messages
20
Reaction score
0
Two more sentences giving me trouble.

1. それは私達に言える事だ。

Does this mean:
a) That is something that we can say.
b) That is something that applies to (can be said about) us.
c) something else?


2. Context: After a fight between two parties, one of them retreats and says this:

今日はこれで帰るが次は決着つけてやるぞ

Which I understand as, "I'll be leaving for today, but next time we'll settle this for sure."

And then the reply:

とか何とか言って逃げんじゃないわよ

I guess the first part is like "Say what you will", "Sure, yeah, whatever", and then something about running away, but is she saying "don't run away" or "I won't run away" or...? I don't get how the two parts connect.
 

Toritoribe

松葉解禁
Moderator
Joined
22 Feb 2008
Messages
17,721
Reaction score
3,930
1)
Both are possible, but it's often used as the meaning #b.

2)
The -te form is used to connect the two clauses, i.e., it represents "and".
とか何とか言う means "to say those things" there.
逃げんじゃないわよ is negative imperative, thus, the subject is "you". When it expresses the speaker's excuse, 逃げるんじゃないわよ/のよ is more common.
As you might already understand, 逃げる is not just "to run away here" but "not to come back and fight with us again" in that case.
 

Sciurus

後輩
Joined
12 Mar 2017
Messages
20
Reaction score
0
Thanks for breaking the second sentence down, Toritoribe-san. It's a lot clearer now.

So, uh... To put it back together...

"Don't say those things, come back and fight with us again." ?
 

Toritoribe

松葉解禁
Moderator
Joined
22 Feb 2008
Messages
17,721
Reaction score
3,930
とか何とか言って is not negative imperative. そんなこと言って might be more familiar to you, may be?

I think there is no problem with "Don't run away from us!" for 逃げんじゃないわよ if you understand that it's not just "Don't run away from here."
 

Sciurus

後輩
Joined
12 Mar 2017
Messages
20
Reaction score
0
So... "Don't run away from us as you say those things"?

I'm just trying to figure out how it all fits into one coherent sentence.
 

bentenmusume

やれやれ
Contributor
Joined
12 Oct 2004
Messages
1,227
Reaction score
1,092
It's not "as."

The nuance is "Don't say those things (i.e. "don't talk all tough like that") and then go running away on us, you hear!?"

At its heart, it's a pretty straightforward use of the -te form to describe actions happening in sequence, though I can see how it might throw you for a loop the first time you see it.

A similar example might be something like 「自分から誘っておいてドタキャンする奴なんて最低」 or what-have-you.
 

Toritoribe

松葉解禁
Moderator
Joined
22 Feb 2008
Messages
17,721
Reaction score
3,930
My interpretation is とか何とか言って逃げんじゃないわよ, i.e., じゃない only negates 逃げる. The nuance of the -te form would be more likely closer to adversative conjunction in this case just like とか何とか言うけど/言ったくせに. It's possible to interpret that じゃない negates the whole とか何とか言って逃げる, though.
 

Sciurus

後輩
Joined
12 Mar 2017
Messages
20
Reaction score
0
Another tricky one.

Context: girl is turning down suitors at a beach.
私より他にお似合いのコがいくらでもいるでしょ?(Aren't there are many other better-suited girls around here?)
声かけるならそういうコにしておきなさい。
The second sentence is a bit unclear. Based on context, I'm guessing something like "If you want to call out to (hit on) someone, please do it with (hit on) those girls."

Am I in the ballpark?
 

Sciurus

後輩
Joined
12 Mar 2017
Messages
20
Reaction score
0
Hey, been a while :)

I'm having trouble with an expression that I suspect is a slang of some sort.
Context: two groups of people arguing, then one person turns to his friend and says:

行くぞ。こんなお花畑を引き連れる。

Basically he's exasperated and saying "let's bail" but I don't understand the meaning of お花畑 here.
 

Toritoribe

松葉解禁
Moderator
Joined
22 Feb 2008
Messages
17,721
Reaction score
3,930
Isn't there any typos/misreading there? It doesn't make sense at all. What is the full conversation? Isn't お花畑 mentioned previously in the story?
 

Sciurus

後輩
Joined
12 Mar 2017
Messages
20
Reaction score
0
Nope. First and only mention.

Since they're talking to a group of girls, could this "flower garden" refer to a group of pretty girls? I didn't think it was linked to the next part (先生の指図を受けたところで時間の無駄だぜ), but maybe put together, could this mean something like "Taking this group of girls with us is a waste of time, even if it was the teacher's order" or something?
 

Toritoribe

松葉解禁
Moderator
Joined
22 Feb 2008
Messages
17,721
Reaction score
3,930
Perhaps there is actually no period after 引き連れる, right?
 

Sciurus

後輩
Joined
12 Mar 2017
Messages
20
Reaction score
0
Yeah, it's an exchange in a manga and those were in two separate speech bubbles in the same panel. I mentally inserted a period after the first one, which caused the confusion I guess.
 

Toritoribe

松葉解禁
Moderator
Joined
22 Feb 2008
Messages
17,721
Reaction score
3,930
こんなお花畑を引き連れる doesn't make sense as a single sentence, but it's valid as a modifying clause in "こんなお花畑を引き連れる先生".
Your guess about お花畑 is correct. It refers to the girls.

It's a waste of time to take orders from the teacher who takes such girls with him/her.
(Notice that the one who is accompanied by the girls is the teacher, not the speaker (and his friend).)
 
Top Bottom