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Japanese Empire use of mercenaries/foreign volunteers (before WW2)?

Hama

Kouhai
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From my knowledge the use of mercenaries or foreign volunteers in Japanese military history since the Meiji restoration seems to fluctuate a bit. I know the Shogunate had some foreign advisors during the Boshin War (not sure about the Imperial side) and that both Japan and Russia employed local Chinese auxiliaries and bandits during the Russo-Japanese War.

But I also know that during the Russo-Japanese war the Japanese commanders refused an offer from some Polish nationalists to form a 'Polish Legion' of defectors from the Russian army that would have fought for Japan against Russia (although Japan was fine with Poles working on their own in Russian territory to do things like sabotage communications and distribute revolutionary pamphlets).

Does anyone know other examples of Japan employing mercenaries or foreign volunteers during their wars after the Meiji restoration and prior to WW2? For example I know they were allied with some White Russian factions during the Siberian Intervention, but did they also use local mercenaries/auxiliaries (e.g. Mongols, indigenous Siberians, or Russian irregulars) as they had done with local Manchurians during the 1904-05 war? Or what about during the Sino-Japanese war of 1894-95, does anyone know if there were perhaps Chinese renegades or Koreans who were employed for auxiliary military roles by Japan?
 
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After reading the title i wanted to pop by and mention Oda Nobunaga's black samurai, but after reading the rest of the post it is clear that Yasuke is of no relevance here. The subject, however intrigues me too.
 

Hama

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Yeah sorry, what I meant by "Japanese Empire" was Japan from the point where the Emperor actually became the head of a centralised state, i.e. Meiji restoration onwards.
 
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