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japanese -- adjectives

pacerier

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1. is there somewhere where i can have the entire list (or close to) of japanese adjectives? somewhere which lists mayb a few hundred adjectives all in one webpage


2. and how do you use kurushii and kibishii?

3. is hazukashii more of shy or ashamed?

4. does yasashii only mean something that is easy to do?

5. can amai be used to describe someone who is very sweet to you?

6. can byouki be used to described someone that is "sick" mentally?

7. how do we use shizen?

8. is genki a I- or NA- adjective?
 
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Kirakira1232

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1. is there somewhere where i can have the entire list (or close to) of japanese adjectives? somewhere which lists mayb a few hundred adjectives all in one webpage


2. and how do you use kurushii and kibishii?

3. is hazukashii more of shy or ashamed?

4. does yasashii only mean something that is easy to do?

5. can amai be used to describe someone who is very sweet to you?

6. can byouki be used to described someone that is "sick" mentally?

7. how do we use shizen?

8. is genki a I- or NA- adjective?

Kurushii is more like pain, in the sense that if your teased, you would maybe describe the feeling as "kurushii". Kibishii largely means "strict" but can also mean "relentless" or "serious" depending on the context.

Hazukashii can be interpreted as both, it is of course depends on the context it is used in.

Yasashii can describe something like an exam or a task as being "easy" but it can also mean "gentle" in the context of describing people.

Amai I have never heard of as being used to describe people. I only hear it in context of food being sweet.

Shizen is used like any other na adjective. It can used to describe nature as in like the environment and the way people speak can be described as "shizen":

Oosutoraria ha shizen ga ippai aru ne
Australia is full of nature isnt it?

ano kare ga nihongo wo shizen ni hanashiteru yo ne
That guy speaks Japanese so naturally doesnt he

Oosutararia de ha "G'day mate" to iu no hou ga shizen da to omou yo.
I think saying "g'day mate" in Australia is more natural.

Genki is a na adjective.

"
 
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Putrefaction

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Kibishii largely means "strict" but can also mean "relentless" or "serious" depending on the context.

So then, to give a small sentence, could you say:
Kono sensei wa kibishii desu.
That teacher is strict.

(repped for a good post!)
 

Kirakira1232

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So then, to give a small sentence, could you say:
Kono sensei wa kibishii desu.
That teacher is strict.

(repped for a good post!)

It would be:

Sensei ga kibishii desu.

But you are right on the money with the meaning though! 👍
 

Mike Cash

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Amai I have never heard of as being used to describe people. I only hear it in context of food being sweet.

It can be used to describe people, but it has an entirely different meaning than does "sweet" in English. It means something similar to "naive".

It would be:
Sensei ga kibishii desu.
But you are right on the money with the meaning though! 👍

Why could it not be "Kono sensei wa kibishii desu"

Please explain:

A) Why it is not allowed
B) How it is different
C) How in heck you would know absent any context

Thank you.
 

Elizabeth

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Amai I have never heard of as being used to describe people. I only hear it in context of

甘い 【あまい】 (exp,adj-i) (1) (uk) sweet; delicious; (2) fragrant (smelling); sweet (music); (3) lightly salted; (4) (See 甘く見る) naive; overly optimistic; soft on; generous; indulgent; easy-going; (5) half-hearted; not finished properly; (6) tempting (e.g. words); promising;

Shizen is used like any other na adjective. It can used to describe nature as in like the environment and the way people speak can be described as "shizen":
Oosutoraria ha shizen ga ippai aru ne
Australia is full of nature isnt it?
Shouldn't this be "Oosutoraria ha shizen de ippai desu. ?? :)
 

undrentide

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It would be:

Sensei ga kibishii desu.

Unless you want to emphasize WHO is strict (when answering to a question such as "dono sensei ga kibishii desuka?" for insntace), it should be kono sensei wa kibishii desu. ;-)

Shouldn't this be "Oosutoraria ha shizen de ippai desu. ?? :)

Either shizen ga ippai and shizen de ippai will do, though shizen ga ippai is more commonly used.
 
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Kirakira1232

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Unless you want to emphasize WHO is strict (when answering to a question such as "dono sensei ga kibishii desuka?" for insntace), it should be kono sensei wa kibishii desu. ;-)



Either shizen ga ippai and shizen de ippai will do, though shizen ga ippai is more commonly used.


Ahhh yes! Well I've always been in the mind set of using ga when describing objects/things/people XD So it was kind of automatic :p But yeah if there are a group of sensei then wa would be correct.

I've never heard of shizen de ippai before though 😌
 

Mike Cash

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Ahhh yes! Well I've always been in the mind set of using ga when describing objects/things/people XD So it was kind of automatic :p But yeah if there are a group of sensei then wa would be correct.

A little word of wisdom here, if I may be allowed:

Avoid making categorical statements regarding the usage of wa/ga.
 
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