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Japan: examples of modern Japan alongside tradition.

wriot

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Hey there,

When I think about Japan I often get the feeling that Japan is an extremely modern and technologically advanced nation, but what sets is apart from other modern european nations and the US is the way that it has developed whilst maintaining a strong sense of its own culture. When I try to think of good examples which show this however I have quite a hard time - I was wondering if anybody out there might have some good ideas.

The sort of things I have come up with are how the traditional Ryokan Onsen is such a popular place to stay (and expensive) despite there being arguably more luxurious and advanced hotels? This possibly shows that Japanese take comfort in their own culture?

The perserverance of Japanese bathing culture and visiting bath houses - rather than just taking a shower?

I have also been trying to think of places where traditional buildings exist alongside more modern buildings - possibly Sensō-ji in Asakusa with buildings such as the Asahi building in the same area.

I don't think these examples are very strong and I'm having a bit of a mental block at the moment! If you have any angles on this concept and can give me any examples which show either Japan choosing tradition over technology or a modern approach which maintains tradition, then I'd love to hear from you.

Thanks!

(PS. I am European and have never been able to visit Japan so I might not know what I'm talking about!)
 

caster51

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The sort of things I have come up with are how the traditional Ryokan Onsen is such a popular place to stay (and expensive) despite there being arguably more luxurious and advanced hotels? This possibly shows that Japanese take comfort in their own culture?
The perserverance of Japanese bathing culture and visiting bath houses - rather than just taking a shower?

I think that it is a personal idea.

I have also been trying to think of places where traditional buildings exist alongside more modern buildings - possibly Sensō-ji in Asakusa with buildings such as the Asahi building in the same area
.

It is there because of only needing it.

I don't think these examples are very strong and I'm having a bit of a mental block at the moment! If you have any angles on this concept and can give me any examples which show either Japan choosing tradition over technology or a modern approach which maintains tradition, then I'd love to hear from you.

to keep a same thing more than hundreds years is not easy.
There is a thing that cannot be never revived, too, when lost once.
For instance, curio

this is a Japanese traditional house.
It is the most luxurious construction today


another example ,Isejingu
Ise-Jingu's transfer of a shrine
it to continue Rebuilding the same constractions and to remake the ancient materials are worthy for more than ten handreds years.
in other case ,to protecting historical constractins is worthy..
here is the Japanese holy place
it costs more than $300 milion...and it needs 10,000 trees to rebuilt
is the most important ceremony of Japan's constraction

At the Grand Shrine of ise (Ise Jingu) the most important ceremony is Sengu, where every 20 years all the shrine buildings within Ise Jingu are alternately rebuilt at designated sites next to their present locations. The Gods and Goddesses are transferred to the new dwellings with new treasures and garments. During the Sengu, using traditional methods from long ago, exact copies of shrine buildings are rebuilt and 1600 different treasures and garments are remade. This tradition has continued for 1300 years without disruption, except during the civil war in the 16 century

インターネット放送局
インターネット放送局

and so is to make real katana.

The problem is how to judge the value.
 
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