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Jane is going to marry Tom next month

hirashin

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Hello, native English speakers, would you help me again?

Would all the sentences be used?
(a) Jane is going to get married to Tom next month.
(b) Jane is going to marry Tom next month.
(c) Jane will get married to Tom next month.
(d) Jane will marry Tom next month.
(e) Jane is getting married to Tom next month.
(f) Jane is marrying Tom next month.
(g) Jane is going to be getting married to Tom next month.
(h) Jane will be getting married to Tom next month.

Thanks in advance.

Hirashin
 

mdchachi

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I believe they are all correct and sound ok to me. As usual though the general rule of thumb is to keep it short and simple. So while (g) doesn't sound odd, I don't think it would be used much.
 

RockmanX

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I believe they are all correct and sound ok to me. As usual though the general rule of thumb is to keep it short and simple. So while (g) doesn't sound odd, I don't think it would be used much.

I agree, (g) is more suited for wedding anoucement. Mdchachi I have a question, which of the sayings, if any are informal?
 

mdchachi

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Mdchachi I have a question, which of the sayings, if any are informal?
I'm no expert but I don't see any differences in terms of formality. They all seem "normal" to me. I wouldn't consciously choose one over the other. I'd probably say whichever one I happened to be used to.
 

hirashin

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Thank you for the help, mdchachi and RockmanX. RockmanX, are you American?
 

RockmanX

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Thank you for the help, mdchachi and RockmanX. RockmanX, are you American?
Yep! live outside the bronx in mamaroneck, New York. Mamaroneck is a native american name which 90% of people i tell cannot pronounce it hehe.
 

RobertoSeven

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Hello Hirashin.
These are all good although I would say that only g) wouldn't be used. You're very unlikely to hear that one. It sounds like a mouthfull because of the two verbs: going and getting in the same sentence. I think you covered this one with a) which skinda mich more natural. Another way is: Jane is going to be marrying Tom next month.
 

hirashin

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Thanks for the help, RobertoSeven. According to your profile, you're from Britain. Where in Britain are you from?
I think you covered this one with a) which skinda mich more natural.
I'm afraid I don't understand this sentence. Are the words "skinda" and "mich" slang or typos?

Hirashin
 

RobertoSeven

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いえ。Wow, I really messed up that sentence. Well the autocorrect on my tablet did. Thanks Google! I meant to say: I think you covered this one with a) which is much more natural.

はい, 私は英国の出身です。元々からブラクブン,今マンチェスタに15年くらい住でいます。
Yes, I am from Britain. Originally from Blackburn, now I live in Manchester and have for around 15 years.

Please, feel free to correct my Japanese. I'm especially interested in if you would write, and say, Blackburn (unusual name isn't it) as I did.

Have you always lived in Kyoto Hirashin?
 

lanthas

 
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hirashin: "kinda" is an informal shortened form of "kind of", used in spoken English. E.g.: "Kinda sad if you think about it".

RobertoSeven: you can use the Wikipedia language switch feature and sometimes Google Translate to find out the common Japanese transliteration for names of non-Japanese people and places. These give ブラックバーン and マンチェスター for Blackburn and Manchester respectively.
 

hirashin

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Hello, RobertoSeven.
いえ。Wow, I really messed up that sentence. Well the autocorrect on my tablet did. Thanks Google! I meant to say: I think you covered this one with a) which is much more natural.

Do you think (a) is the best?
(a) Jane is going to get married to Tom next month.

はい, 私は英国の出身です。元々からブラクブン,今マンチェスタに15年くらい住でいます。
Yes, I am from Britain. Originally from Blackburn, now I live in Manchester and have for around 15 years.

Please, feel free to correct my Japanese. I'm especially interested in if you would write, and say, Blackburn (unusual name isn't it) as I did.

OK. I'll correct your Japanese for you.
ブラックバーンの出身ですが、15年くらい前からマンチェスターに住んでいます. would be better.

In Japanese, "barn" and "burn" become the same pronunciation バーン.

Have you always lived in Kyoto Hirashin?

I have lived in Kyoto for almost all my life. (Does this sound right?)

Though I'm not confident in my English, I teach English to Japanese students.
Teaching something I'm not confident in is stressful.

Hirashin from Kyoto, Japan
 

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hirashin

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To Lanthas:
Thanks for your help.
hirashin: "kinda" is an informal shortened form of "kind of", used in spoken English. E.g.: "Kinda sad if you think about it".

Yes. I know "kinda". I've often heard it.
Would the following sentences sound right?
(a) I'm kinda tired.
(b) I kinda believe him.
(c) That's kinda strange.

Hirashin
 
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