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ponette

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Hi, everyone!

I'm new here.
Ever since visiting Japan, I always wanted to learn Japanese and I did for several months.
However, the place I learned Japanese was far from where I live.

At the moment, I'm revising the materials from my previous lessons and practicing my Hiragana and Gatakana reading, but no one to correct me.

I have this lovely Japanese children book and I think this is the story that I loved when I was young. And I can read Hiragana but don't know the meaning..

where can I find a tutor that can go through these materials together?

Ponette
 

JTM

窶堋ィ窶堋オ窶堙。窶堙冷?堙ィ窶禿ャヒ弸
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The following website lists resources in Belgium where you might be able to go to for your search for a Japanese tutor.

http://www.bja.be/links.php

Here's a listing of some the associations that might be able to help you:

Japan in Belgium
Japanese Studies - Catholic University of Leuven
http://japanologie.arts.kuleuven.be/

Nihonjinkai
http://www.nihonjinkai.be/

Belgian Association of Japanese Language Teachers
http://www.bnk-nihongo.be

Japanese Embassy in Belgium
http://www.be.emb-japan.go.jp/english/

Japanese School in Brussels
http://www.japanese-school-brussels.be/

Japanese Studies - University of Ghent
http://www.southandeastasia.ugent.be/Japanologie

Belgium-Japan Association's Friendship Committee
http://www.bja-yc.be/
 
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Awesome research! I have a challenge for you! Try finding Japanese study programs in Oklahoma. :( we are a deserted freaking tornado dump.
 

Uncle Frank

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Uncle Frank says try my uncle GOOGLE.....

Try typing in:

Japan American Society of Oklahoma

University of Oklahoma Japanese Student Association

Oklahoma Anime Conventions

Japan Business Association of Oklahoma

Hopefully those may provide leads or links to other things to do with Japan. Somtimes your local clubs or schools/colleges may have programs where you can have a Japanese student come and stay with your family for just weekends or for a summer.

Good luck

Uncle Frank

:?

PS: Years ago when I wanted to practice Japanese I would go to Japanese restaurants(at the mall) and also I found a man at the grocery store from Japan who made their sushi. Finding Japanese in Maine was also difficult, LOL.
 
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Thank you very much! I will do. I am a little lucky though. My Aunt said if I was willing to drive the hour and 45 mins to her house I could take lessons from her. (she is japanese.) At lest as long as she is here before my Uncle is stationed somewhere else.
 

mikokatt

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I'm in the same boat. I live in Colorado and wish to learn Japanese. I've tried online sites but none have worked. any tips for me?
 

nellie1208

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Hi there~ :)
You could try browsing all over here. :) I've tried it there, that's how I learn japanese.
- www(dot)tinyurl(dot)com/ucanspeakjapanese You should try. I've been trying to practice to be fluent on the language. And it wont be a hassle for me anymore. 👍
 

breezie1977

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I started learning Japanese in 2004 through every method I could find. CDs, books, face to face lessons, audio mp3 (everyday, and hour a day for two years), manga/anime, childrens cartoons, you name it.. I tried it.

Without a doubt the most memorable of these was a book called "Essential Japanese" written by Berlitz. It's written in romaji (English alphabet characters) and is therefore very easy to understand without having to know the kana (Hiragana/Katakana) and actually teaches stuff that you will use in everyday conversation. I can't post the link because I'm a new member, but if you search for "Berlitz Essential Japanese" you should find a book with a picture of a Japanese lady laughing heartily and holding a glass of coke (perhaps!).

I remember being incredibly frustrated by the 'masu' form of Japanese which every textbook I ever picked up focused on to the point of obsession. Many other books also start with grammar and sentence structure, which (although very wise) doesn't help in real-life situations. This book actually teaches useful stuff that you WILL use in nearly every conversation you have in your Japanese life. It's sticks with the 'masu' form (as when you get further in your Japanese development you'll see why they focus on this so much), but does show some introductions into normal conversations using the informal.
It uses the usual 'foreigner in Japan' storyline to teach with example conversations about "Smisu san" (Mr Smith) getting through his few months in Japan, but the conversations are clever, encompass as much as they can in a short period of time and are also very funny!

Audio MP3's did nothing but boost my confidence without boosting my skill (I got a real shock when I first arrived in Japan!!) and internet sites just never really floated my boat for learning purposes.

After you've gotten your leg up with books like the above, the next step is learning the kana - hiragana and katakana. Kanji can wait. I just wrote the hiragana out religiously until I could write them all without looking. Then I moved on to the Katakana, which took a much shorter time, oddly enough.

After this you're looking at total immersion. Buy some childrens books that use only the kana (Doreamon/One Peice) and try to understand the story as you struggle through.

One to one lessons should be taken at least twice a week. Everyday would be the best, but at the very least twice a week. Once just isn't enough and you should be aiming to conduct a good part of your life in Japanese (homework/relaxation/socializing/etc).

It's a tough old journey, but total immersion in your chosen language allows you to learn about the culture as you learn the language and answers many questions about why things are as they are, making your study more interesting and easier to absorb.

Anyway, when you start dreaming in Japanese, you'll know you're on the right road!!!:D

Hope that helps,

Tony
 
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