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Question I'm working on my phlebotomy degree in the us and wondering how that would fallow me to Japan.

Ophelia22

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So I'm chronic-ly ill but working on moving to Japan. I actually want to be a dermatologist but phlebotomy will put my foot in the door for medicine. My high school offers a phlebotomy program. I plan on getting certified but how would it fallow me to Japan? I also plan on taking 2 years of college in the US because it worries my moms me moving to Japan with a chronic illness. But I'll be able to afford my medicine and medical care by myself in Japan! So I was wondering how those 2 years of college and phlebotomy certification will fallow me? Will I have to take those 2 years again? because that would mess up my plans for medical school. If I have to get recertafied that doesn't bother me.
 

Uncle Frank

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I don't want to sink your dreams for your future , but most jobs in Japan require you speak very good Japanese and that there are no Japanese to fill the job so it could be open for you. Maybe you can attend a college that offers a language course in Japanese. Also , it recommended that people visit Japan first , before planning to live there. It's not always a wonderful dream place to live that people imagine it to be. The meds you require and any medical treatment you require may not be available to you and should be checked out. As an old fogey , I suggest you wait till you are halfway through your second year of college before you check into coming to Japan and living there. If you have a Japanese embassy anywhere near you , it might pay to visit it and ask more questions to them about your plans. Hopefully , a few more people here can also give you more advice.
 

mdchachi

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I don't know for sure but I don't think there is any transfer of licenses or certifications but of course having experience would give you a leg up on getting re-certified in Japan. The main barrier would be the language and expense I would guess. As far as transfer of college credits go, I think it's not likely they would transfer but you would have to check with the schools in Japan for their requirements.
By "working on moving to Japan" what do you mean? On what kind of visa would you go? Or do you have a Japanese passport? Is your plan to go to medical school in Japan?
 

Ophelia22

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Yes I plan on studying medical in Japan. I'm actually only in my 3rd year of high school so I have a few years before I go. By working on moving to Japan I'm mostly working on my language skills and hopefully I'll be able to get a job to save money (probably not).
 

Uncle Frank

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Don't slam her dream too hard , she's just a very young girl with dreams of her future and still working on them. Hopefully we can help her with her Japanese language skills here and help her with her dream. I never would have lived in Japan if it wasn't for my time in the Military , another way many people get to go to Japan. We have had a few members over the years who as a young person , had dreams of going to Japan , and five or 6 years latter , they tell us they made it. Hopefully , Ophelia will find a way to her dreams someday and we can give her helpful hints to make it come true.
 

mdchachi

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Yes I plan on studying medical in Japan. I'm actually only in my 3rd year of high school so I have a few years before I go. By working on moving to Japan I'm mostly working on my language skills and hopefully I'll be able to get a job to save money (probably not).
If you don't have a Japanese parent then you can't just move to Japan. You'll need a visa that allows you to enter the country for whatever the purpose the visa is for. Such as to study as an exchange student or to work. I don't know if it's possible/practical to go to medical school in Japan without Japanese fluency. I know there are some degree programs in English for fields such as business but not sure about medical school.
 

Ophelia22

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If you don't have a Japanese parent then you can't just move to Japan. You'll need a visa that allows you to enter the country for whatever the purpose the visa is for. Such as to study as an exchange student or to work. I don't know if it's possible/practical to go to medical school in Japan without Japanese fluency. I know there are some degree programs in English for fields such as business but not sure about medical school.
Yeah I know. I'm working on my fluency and I have 4 years before I got. I'll get all my visa stuff sorted out that last year. I also know I'll have to request to be able to work with a student visa. Luckily I have connections l. +I'm still in high school I should have mentioned that and I have an invisible disability but luckily I've found meds that work. Of course my mom wants me to take 2 years on uni in America. Because she worries so I'm obliging her with that. tho we both know we can't afford that and it would be more cost-effective for me to go to Japan anyways and not even just for the medical care.
 

Ophelia22

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If you want to get a job in Japan, you will need to get a four-year college degree. Do you want to go to college?


Have you mastered the reading and writing of hiragana and katakana?
To the first question. I have to go to college of my mom would kill me + I want to be a dermatologist anyway.

Second question i Mostly master hiragana and can write a=b sentences and read time. But i have time and if I keep to my schedule I'll be able to get to basic Proficiency in 7 months hopefully.
 

Ophelia22

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I don't know for sure but I don't think there is any transfer of licenses or certifications but of course having experience would give you a leg up on getting re-certified in Japan. The main barrier would be the language and expense I would guess. As far as transfer of college credits go, I think it's not likely they would transfer but you would have to check with the schools in Japan for their requirements.
By "working on moving to Japan" what do you mean? On what kind of visa would you go? Or do you have a Japanese passport? Is your plan to go to medical school in Japan?
Oh I'm mostly doing research and really getting serious about learning the language. I'm still in high school and have 4 years before I go anyway. I know I'll need a student visa and I'll have to ask for promision to be able to work with it to.
 

Ophelia22

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I don't want to sink your dreams for your future , but most jobs in Japan require you speak very good Japanese and that there are no Japanese to fill the job so it could be open for you. Maybe you can attend a college that offers a language course in Japanese. Also , it recommended that people visit Japan first , before planning to live there. It's not always a wonderful dream place to live that people imagine it to be. The meds you require and any medical treatment you require may not be available to you and should be checked out. As an old fogey , I suggest you wait till you are halfway through your second year of college before you check into coming to Japan and living there. If you have a Japanese embassy anywhere near you , it might pay to visit it and ask more questions to them about your plans. Hopefully , a few more people here can also give you more advice.
I have I volunteer with the japnese society and getting japnese lessons through them. I already have a basic understanding of how I would go about getting a student visa and getting permission to be able to work with that student visa. I also know insurance in Japan i will be able to get a wheelchair if I need one again. ( my insurance in America sure gave me the middle finger and didn't I wasn't able to leave the house for 1 year lol) as for medication I'm working on that I'm seeingeeing if I'll need to change it. luckily it's easy to get because it's also used for ADD and 50% of people with what I'm diagnosed with have a form of ADHD or ADD.
 

mdchachi

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it would be more cost-effective for me to go to Japan anyways and not even just for the medical care.
Why do you think it's more cost effective to go to Japan? Do you have some support system there? Regardless of where you live, you need to pay rent, buy food, etc.

Oh I'm mostly doing research and really getting serious about learning the language. I'm still in high school and have 4 years before I go anyway.
Four years go by quickly. Take it from us old people. :) This is a good place to get help with your Japanese questions too. Hopefully you'll stick around and we can support you.

I already have a basic understanding of how I would go about getting a student visa and getting permission to be able to work with that student visa.
What kind of job do you think you'll be able to find? I'm not sure but I think part-time students jobs tend to be teaching English-related or service sector jobs such as waitress or retail.

I don't want to be too discouraging but I can't imagine going to medical school in Japan successfully unless there is an English-based program. Learning how to be "fluent" for every day living is a lot different than being able to read textbooks and understand medical terminology and pass all the written exams. Another thing to consider is that if you do become a doctor, as I understand it, doctors don't make that much money in Japan as compared to the U.S.
 

Buntaro

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I'll have to request to be able to work with a student visa.


Be advised that Americans cannot get a Working Visa but British people can (at least that is how it used to be). Also, some jobs will hire people with a Working Visa but not people with a Student Visa.


i Mostly master hiragana and can write a=b sentences and read time.


Good for you. Try to avoid writing Japanese words in Romaji as you study.


i will be able to get a wheelchair if I need one


You may want to watch these videos.




 

mdchachi

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Be advised that Americans cannot get a Working Visa but British people can (at least that is how it used to be). Also, some jobs will hire people with a Working Visa but not people with a Student Visa.
You're talking about Working Holiday program aren't you? Student visa which allows part-time work should be the same shouldn't it?
 

Ophelia22

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Be advised that Americans cannot get a Working Visa but British people can (at least that is how it used to be). Also, some jobs will hire people with a Working Visa but not people with a Student Visa.





Good for you. Try to avoid writing Japanese words in Romaji as you study.





You may want to watch these videos.




I already have lol
 

Ophelia22

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Why do you think it's more cost effective to go to Japan? Do you have some support system there? Regardless of where you live, you need to pay rent, buy food, etc.


Four years go by quickly. Take it from us old people. :) This is a good place to get help with your Japanese questions too. Hopefully you'll stick around and we can support you.


What kind of job do you think you'll be able to find? I'm not sure but I think part-time students jobs tend to be teaching English-related or service sector jobs such as waitress or retail.

I don't want to be too discouraging but I can't imagine going to medical school in Japan successfully unless there is an English-based program. Learning how to be "fluent" for every day living is a lot different than being able to read textbooks and understand medical terminology and pass all the written exams. Another thing to consider is that if you do become a doctor, as I understand it, doctors don't make that much money in Japan as compared to the U.S.
Tbh I can afford living in Japan more than I can afford living in America. + med school isn't as expensive there even if I have to get paid less at least I won't be in late ending debt.
 

nahadef

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Something that might be an option: I have known some Japanese doctors that did a year or two abroad, usually in the States, as part of their education. If there are medical schools that have partnership programs, it's possible that you could use that as a foot in the door to study and live in Japan.
 

nice gaijin

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Pursuing a phlebotomy cert is a great way to kickstart and help support your medical education, as it only requires a GED to professionally draw blood. If you choose to pursue further education, phlebotomy is a great entry level job, and improves your medical knowledge and bedside manner.

I worked on my state's licensing system for lab scientists and phlebotomists, and as I recall, there was a list of accredited schools whose graduation was a requirement for certification. There were some international schools accepted, but that depends on the licensing agency and not the school. I don't recall there being a reciprocal agreement (like if you're certified in X state your license is valid in Y state), and it's even less likely for a license to transfer; you'll need to meet all the Japanese requirements to practice where you want to live. I'd look into which agencies are accepted by the health department. While you're planning your future, use your phlebo certs to earn some travel savings, and come to Japan!! Don't wait for your future to happen in order to take a step that way, come see how you like it

It sounds like you've had some challenges to overcome in your life, and Japan is notoriously difficult for those with mobility issues. I urge you to choose your goals and pursue them, and to also be proud of whatever accomplishments and strides you take toward fulfilling your intention to help others.
 

Ophelia22

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Something that might be an option: I have known some Japanese doctors that did a year or two abroad, usually in the States, as part of their education. If there are medical schools that have partnership programs, it's possible that you could use that as a foot in the door to study and live in Japan.
That's amazing + it gives me more time to study and travel!
 
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