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I think I said the wrong thing leaving a Japanese Restaurant

regalrender

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When leaving the restaurant, I said "ありがとうございます" but I now have learned that when leaving a restaurant one is supposed to say "ごちそうさまでした". Did I make myself look like a fool? I feel ashamed :(
 

lanthas

 
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Embarrassing yourself is an inevitable part of the language learning process. :)
 

regalrender

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Yea, I figured. This is a lesson I won't forget - I loved that restaurant, and now I can't go back until my language skills are better!
 

Mike Cash

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When leaving the restaurant, I said "ありがとうございます" but I now have learned that when leaving a restaurant one is supposed to say "ごちそうさまでした". Did I make myself look like a fool? I feel ashamed :(
No, you didn't make yourself look like a fool.

While not the "correct" thing to say, it is never inappropriate to show one's appreciation for something. They got what you meant and that's what matters.
 

WonkoTheSane

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I have never failed to get a warm smile when saying ありがとうございます upon leaving a restaurant. As well as a welcoming attitude when returning.

There are very few heartfelt words of appreciation which are inappropriate.
 

Lothor

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No, you didn't make yourself look like a fool.

While not the "correct" thing to say, it is never inappropriate to show one's appreciation for something. They got what you meant and that's what matters.
Couldn't agree more! I sometimes find Japanese extremely limiting with its insistence on set phrases.
Instead of all of the possible things you could say to a colleague at the end of a day, it has to be otsukare sama deshita. I much prefer to say something that I mean than to dig out some robotic phrase, even if it's not 'correct'.
 

mdchachi

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Yea, I figured. This is a lesson I won't forget - I loved that restaurant, and now I can't go back until my language skills are better!
Out of all the "inappropriate" things to say, that is the least embarrassing and most appropriate. Go back and change your departure to gochisousamadeshita if you must.

Couldn't agree more! I sometimes find Japanese extremely limiting with its insistence on set phrases.
Instead of all of the possible things you could say to a colleague at the end of a day, it has to be otsukare sama deshita. I much prefer to say something that I mean than to dig out some robotic phrase, even if it's not 'correct'.
If you have a good, fun-loving workgroup try switching it up for fun. They'll probably appreciate it and may even look forward to what you're going to say next.
Like you could try ベットバクに噛まれないように and other random lines.
 

Lothor

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Out of all the "inappropriate" things to say, that is the least embarrassing and most appropriate. Go back and change your departure to gochisousamadeshita if you must.


If you have a good, fun-loving workgroup try switching it up for fun. They'll probably appreciate it and may even look forward to what you're going to say next.
Like you could try ベットバクに噛まれないように and other random lines.
I like that one!
I think it's important to know what the 'correct' expressions are, I wouldn't dream of saying anything but the stock phrase in the case of a bereavement, but I think it's important to break the 'rules' sometimes.
I like saying 恐れないで! when I get 恐れ入ります at cafes if I think the person saying it will find it funny.
 

Mike Cash

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I wouldn't dream of saying anything but the stock phrase in the case of a bereavement, but I think it's important to break the 'rules' sometimes.
In the case of bereavement, the most important thing is showing up.

But I can't help remembering my high school principal saying that it doesn't matter how wonderful a person you are or how many people you help or how many good deeds you do in life, the number of people who show up for your funeral will depend mostly on whether it is raining or not.
 
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I like that one!
I think it's important to know what the 'correct' expressions are, I wouldn't dream of saying anything but the stock phrase in the case of a bereavement, but I think it's important to break the 'rules' sometimes.
I like saying 恐れないで! when I get 恐れ入ります at cafes if I think the person saying it will find it funny.
Couldn't agree more. Every other time when Japanese guests are checking out from the hotel i work at, i would say 天皇陛下によろしく!Although if there are elderly members in the group - i refrain from saying so.
 
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