What's new

I don't like either / I like neither

hirashin

Sempai
Donor
Joined
Apr 8, 2004
Messages
2,383
Reaction score
35
Dear native English speakers,
When someone asks you, "Which do you like better, coffee or tea?",
would both sentences be all right for the answer?
(a) I like neither.
(b) I don't like either.

Thanks in advance.

Hirashin
 

mdchachi

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Mar 6, 2003
Messages
2,604
Reaction score
474
Both are fine. The most natural answer is "neither one." That's an incomplete sentence though.
 

Michael2

Sempai
Joined
Jan 4, 2018
Messages
193
Reaction score
16
I think in England you'd normally use a negative verb so "I don't like either of them," would be most natural. Personally I can't stand "like better" as it doesn't make sense when you think about it. "Which do you prefer?" or "What do you like more?" sounds more natural to me.
 

hirashin

Sempai
Donor
Joined
Apr 8, 2004
Messages
2,383
Reaction score
35
Thanks for the help, mdchachi and Michael2.

Michael2, is it that you would not use "like better" in Britain?
Would it be all right to say "Which do you like more, coffee or tea?" and "Which do you prefer, coffee or tea?"
 

Michael2

Sempai
Joined
Jan 4, 2018
Messages
193
Reaction score
16
I don't think so, no. Tbh that exact sentence comes up so rarely in conversation that I'm not sure. I will ask my students tomorrow.
 
Top