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Hypothetical situation

Mirage

先輩
14 Nov 2003
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Let's say, for instance, that you were on your way to a friends house to pick them up to go out somewhere. Once you got there, you call on your cell phone to say "I'm here." What would be appropriate do you think?

something like :

(私は)ここにいます。

I am here

or just :

(私は)来ました。

I came, have come.

or something else all together?
 
Yea I supposed if its with friends my guesses might be a little too polite. Thanks.
 
I would probably say "Ima kita bakari desu" (I just now arrived) since that's more my style in English. And then when you get home of course you can announce "Tada ima", or literally I'm just here now.
 
Just do like my neighbors friends...

sat there and blow the car horn for ten minutes before they give up and go pound on their door !!!

Frank

:p
 
I wonder "ima touchaku shita bakari desu" would be ok. It means "I have just arrived".
 
Or tsuita bakari desu as well. They come off to me a little like you just arrived somewhere on a bus or plane, more as a tourist than I just got to your house, but I'm just not sure....
 
Originally posted by Elizabeth
Or tsuita bakari desu as well. They come off to me a little like you just arrived somewhere on a bus or plane, more as a tourist than I just got to your house, but I'm just not sure....

yea... touchaku or tsuku sounds like arriving at the airport from what I learn in the class. So that's why I don't know if it's applicable in this case.
 
Originally posted by Golgo_13
Just keep it simple:

Ima tsukimashita! Hayaku detekoi!

Although I do not think that you would want to mix modes here; I am pretty sure they should be kept consistent in most circumstances. How about simply, "来た!"?
 
"Ikuzou!!"

Whats the differencee between that and "Ikimashou"

Just politeness? Because i've heard this in videogames and anime etc.. but I can't find the conjugation in any list. So i figure it must either be slang, or rude :)
 
Originally posted by Mirage
"Ikuzou!!"

Whats the difference between that and "Ikimashou"? Just politeness?

Not quite. 行くぞ is a combination of the verb 行く plus the sentence final particle ぞ (used much like よ, except it is more forceful, hence less polite and less commonly used by females. Also, it does not follow a verb in polite form under normal circumstances). 行きましょう is more like 行く in the polite form plus the volitional (in this case) suffix う (I believe that that is how it is defined in Japanese grammar). So I think of 行きましょう as one word, while 行くぞ is two.

*NOTE* Others may disagree with me on the final point (see this post, and this related one as well). However, even if ぞ is considered a suffix, I still say it is different because ましょう is more of an inflectional ending to me. But like I said, others may disagree.
 
Anyway, isn't ikuzou more like "I'm going!" not "let's go" (ikou, ikimashou, detekoi etc). It doesn't even really make sense in this hypothetical example. :confused:
 
Originally posted by Elizabeth
Anyway, isn't ikuzou more like "I'm going!" not "let's go" (ikou, ikimashou, detekoi etc). It doesn't even really make sense in this hypothetical example. :confused:

Well, if you think about it like this it might:

You arrive at your friend's place at the previously decided upon time to go somewhere that you had decided to go (perhaps see a movie). When you get there, you are ready to go, and you want to let your friend know that it is time to go, so you say, "let's go!"

Also, the う is volitional, even though it is looked upon as invitational in most circumstances. The reason it can be invitational, I suppose is because it expresses a high level of volition, kind of like, "I'm going no matter what." So the listener is left with the choice of going with the speaker or not. I guess from there it got the invitational sense to it. I know that saying ませんか is more polite than ましょう for that very reason; ましょう sounds as if the speaker does not care so much about what the listener wants to do.

P.S. I am pretty sure about most of this, but I cannot list concrete sources. I just know that I have read this information somewhere, at some time, so if anyone could confirm/deny this information absolutely, it would be most appreciated.
 
Originally posted by Glenn
Well, if you think about it like this it might:

You arrive at your friend's place at the previously decided upon time to go somewhere that you had decided to go (perhaps see a movie). When you get there, you are ready to go, and you want to let your friend know that it is time to go, so you say, "let's go!"
Yes, I was simply wondering since "ikuzou" had been considered merely rude whether it even made sense semantically in the context of a "let's go together" dialogue.
 
Originally posted by Elizabeth
Yes, I was simply wondering since "ikuzou" had been considered merely rude whether it even made sense semantically in the context of a "let's go together" dialogue.

Ah, now I see what you were asking. I think that it is just highly informal, and as we know (at least with guys), being highly informal (as well as obscene) is one of the ways that close friends communicate, ne?
 
I'd probably say "tsuita yo" (or "tsukimashita yo" depending on how polite you want to be) meaning "I've arrived."
Then I might follow up with "shita (or soto) ni matte imasu" to mean "I'll be waiting downstairs (or outside)." I think "tsuku" is natural but using "touchaku" sounds odd here IMO.

iku zo is not really rude. Just colloquial and "familiar" (which can be rude in some situations of course). I agree with Glenn's take on it. I also see it used where the person saying it is the one that has control over the movement. Like if you're in the driver's seat of a car and are saying, "OK, here we go!"
 
I love this!

I've never been in the nihongo cabinet before, so I didn't know what to expect here. Quite a few scholars here, it seems. I'll have to come here more often. Anyways, I posted "ikuzou" because I'd had a Japanese friend yell it at me while he was waiting for me in his car. As it was, I was buying can coffee. God, I love that stuff. It's like crack.
 
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