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Help needed to translate shussei nobori

brad carlson

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My father brought this banner back from Japan in 1945. Is this a shussei nobori ?
Also, what do the four Japanese characters on the banner say?
Thank You, BC
IMG_4433 (2).JPG
 

Majestic

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Hello,

The four characters say 冨士の山 (Fuji-no-yama). There is nothing on there indicating a name or a departure, so it doesn't look like a shussei nobori to me.
 

brad carlson

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Hello,

The four characters say 冨士の山 (Fuji-no-yama). There is nothing on there indicating a name or a departure, so it doesn't look like a shussei nobori to me.
That is helpful, thank you for the reply!!
 

brad carlson

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Hello,

The four characters say 冨士の山 (Fuji-no-yama). There is nothing on there indicating a name or a departure, so it doesn't look like a shussei nobori to me.
If you do not mind, what does Fuji no yama mean? Is it Mt. Fuji?
 
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While the banner reads 冨士の山, the actual Mt.Fuji is written as 富士山 (notice the extra stroke at the top of 富 and lack of の)
Another noticible thing is 山 appers to be written in four strokes on the banner, while normally it is written in three.
 

brad carlson

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While the banner reads 冨士の山, the actual Mt.Fuji is written as 富士山 (notice the extra stroke at the top of 富 and lack of の)
Another noticible thing is 山 appers to be written in four strokes on the banner, while normally it is written in three.
Thank You for your input! I did a little more research, and found the following on Wikipedia. Don't know if this is true but it makes sense after what both of you have replied:

"Other Japanese names for Mount Fuji, which have become obsolete or poetic, include Fuji-no-Yama (ふじの山, "the Mountain of Fuji")"
 

Majestic

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Despite the anomalies, I think it refers to Mt. Fuji. Or, I should say, I can't think of a plausible alternative.
 

Toritoribe

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冨 is a common variation of 富.
冨 - Wiktionary

Also, 富(or 冨)士の山 is really used to refer to 富士山, as in the wikipedia page you found.

As for 山, it's often the case in calligraphy that the brush is stopped after a line and then writes the next stroke even if it's usually written in one stroke by pen or pencil. This is applied even to the first touch of a stroke, and as a result, it seems like a dot and connected or slightly separated line, not a simple single line, as you can see in the vertical line or the upper horizontal line in 士. This technique is called とめ. There is no problem to seem to be written in different stroke counts in calligraphy.

Thus, that's a very common calligraphy for Mt. Fuji.
 

brad carlson

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冨 is a common variation of 富.
冨 - Wiktionary

Also, 富(or 冨)士の山 is really used to refer to 富士山, as in the wikipedia page you found.

As for 山, it's often the case in calligraphy that the brush is stopped after a line and then writes the next stroke even if it's usually written in one stroke by pen or pencil. This is applied even to the first touch of a stroke, and as a result, it seems like a dot and connected or slightly separated line, not a simple single line, as you can see in the vertical line or the upper horizontal line in 士. This technique is called とめ. There is no problem to seem to be written in different stroke counts in calligraphy.

Thus, that's a very common calligraphy for Mt. Fuji.
Excellent! I appreciate the information. It does help clarify the written script on the banner.
 
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