What's new

Welcome to Japan Reference (JREF) - the community for all Things Japanese.

Join Today! It is fast, simple, and FREE!

Learn Japanese with JapanesePod101.com

Final Exam of the First Term (6) again

hirashin

Sempai
Donor
Joined
8 Apr 2004
Messages
2,495
Reaction score
44
Dear native English speakers,
Could you check my sentences?

Q6
(1) She (takes ) pride ( in ) her country.
(2) They have a great ( spirit ) of ( adventure ).
(3) You ( can ) go abroad ( to ) study.
(4) (Some ) people regard you ( as ) a genius.
(5) It is ( important ) to ( learn ) a ( foreign )( language ).
(6) After ( all ), this is our own ( country ).
(7) If you ( see ) Jane, can you ( ask ) her ( to ) come to my house?
(8) If I ( have ) time, I'll ( call/phone ) you later.
(9) Do you go ( to ) school ( by )( bike )?
(10) We ( share ) these ideals ( with ) the ( Japanese ).

Q8
(1)Tom must be busy now.
(2)I was invited to Tom's birthday party.
(3)Japanese religious groups don't fight each other.
(4)There was a 10% rise in the numer of foreign students between 2010 and 2015.
(5)According to the survey carried out last year, the number of Japanese students studying abroad is decreasing.

Q9
(1)That American boy is called Matt.
(2)She must have been a math teacher.
(3)If it rains tomorrow, I'll be/stay (at) home.
(4)I go to school by bike.

Thanks in advance.

Hirashin
 
Joined
21 Jun 2017
Messages
703
Reaction score
95
They have a great ( spirit ) of ( adventure ).
That's an odd sentence. Is that supposed to mean that they are adventurous?

There aren't many contexts where "spirit" is talked about in English. The only ones I can think of at the moment is by itself as "That's the spirit!" which is sort of an encouragement phrase, and e.g. "the spirit of the law" which means the intention of the person writing the law, or how the law should be enforced. There are probably others I'm not thinking of, but "spirit of adventure" isn't one I've heard before.

If it rains tomorrow, I'll be/stay (at) home.
These are both correct, but have different meanings. "I'll be at home" is a way to tell someone where you will be, while "I'll stay at home" is an indication that you don't intend to go anywhere.

Everything else looks perfect.
 

hirashin

Sempai
Donor
Joined
8 Apr 2004
Messages
2,495
Reaction score
44
Thanks for the help, Julimaruchan.
That's an odd sentence. Is that supposed to mean that they are adventurous?

There aren't many contexts where "spirit" is talked about in English. The only ones I can think of at the moment is by itself as "That's the spirit!" which is sort of an encouragement phrase, and e.g. "the spirit of the law" which means the intention of the person writing the law, or how the law should be enforced. There are probably others I'm not thinking of, but "spirit of adventure" isn't one I've heard before.
Then, how about this? It's from the textbook we use.
In coming to Japan, such people must have had a great spirit of adventure.
 
Joined
21 Jun 2017
Messages
703
Reaction score
95
It looks like a flowery and metaphorical way of saying that someone is adventurous. I don't get why that usage of "spirit" would be taught. It looks like an artistic form of writing, something you might find in a novel or song or something like that. I certainly wouldn't expect to hear it in conversation, unless it was a meme or line that was being quoted.
 

mdchachi

Moderator
Moderator
Joined
6 Mar 2003
Messages
3,033
Reaction score
713
If it's in the textbook you can put it on the test. It is correct grammatically.
However as JuliMaruchan says it's not something you would hear in spoken language much. But if I read it in a book or online, I wouldn't think it is odd. Maybe even in a seminar or Ted Talk or something. But I can't really think of a common situation where I would say that conversationally.
 

Create an account or login to comment

You must be a member in order to leave a comment

Create account

Create an account on our community. It's easy!

Log in

Already have an account? Log in here.

Top Bottom