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Fall Recipes

misa.j

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The fall is considered as the best season to eat in Japan, vegetables are harvested and many seafood are in season. I would like to share some of my fall recipe ideas and like to hear yours if you have one.
This thread doesn't have to be limited to only Japanese recipes; your experience, ideas and opinions about food in general are more than welcome!


Chicken & mushroom in rice I made it just this morning.
If you have a rice cooker, this is so easy to make, plus you can make different variations with different ingredients.

Wash 3 cups of rice. Place in the rice cooker with 3 2/3 cups of water.
Cut up 1 chicken breast in 1 inch bite size.
Clean 3~4 button mushrooms, trim and slice them.
Add chicken, mushrooms, green peas over rice evenly.
Season with 2 tbs soy sauce, 1 tbs white wine.
Start the rice cooker.
Serve with sprinkle of sesame seeds.

Other good variations: salmon & dill, clams & snow peas, chestnut, bamboo shoots ect.


Do you have any recipes to share?
 
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misa.j

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Agedashi-Dofu

This is a very simple dish, but it's very tasty.

Cut 2 cakes of tofu, pressed for about 30 minutes to let the moisture out, into half lengthwise.
Dredge tofu lightly with flour.
Deep fry tofu in 3 inches of oil over medium heat in a heavy-bottomed pot for 6~8 minutes.
Drain the tofu and serve immediately. Garnish with bonito flakes and finely chopped green oninons.

<sauce>
1 1/2 cups of dashi
2 tbsps soy sauce
2 tbsps mirin
 

epigene

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ニ段ニ停?愴蛋ニ槌槌鍛ニ弾ツ・ニ池ニ池ニ停?愴弛

Hi, misa-san!

The hottest period is finally over, and we enjoyed Chuushuu no Meigetsuツ(窶吮??ツ秋窶堙娯?督シナ椎スツ)last night. The sky was fortunately clear this year, and we could see the full moon from our windows! :v:

Well, I was thinking a "fall recipe" to post here, but couldn't think of any--many elaborate to prepare and some ingredients you don't see in other countries. So I decided to post a recipe that is a big hit with my kids: Quick 'n' easy bibimbap.

Yes, it's not Japanese but has become a popular dish here. Most like the dish cooked in stone pots and think it cannot be made easily at home. But, I saw this recipe on TV a couple of years ago and tested it -- everyone loves it because it's so easy to make! The only problem may be the hot Korean paste (gochujang ニ坦ニ蛋ニ停?ヲニ淡ニ槌槌停?? but I think it's available in many parts of the US (and maybe Europe, too?).

Anyway here goes:

Ingredients:
Cooked rice (cold rice is OK): 300g
Beef (thinly sliced or strips): 100g
Kimchi: 100g
Nira or any other green vegetable like spinach: 10g
Bean sprouts (or sprouted chickpeas): 150g
Garlic (grated): To taste

Sauce:
  • Grated garlic: To taste
  • Grated or chopped sesame seeds (white): 2 tablespoons
  • Soy sauce: 2 tablespoons
  • Sugar: 2 teaspoons
  • Gochujang paste: 2 teaspoons
  • Sesame oil: 1-2 teaspoons
1 egg yolk
Salt & pepper to taste

How to cook:
  1. Cut beef & kimchi in bite-size pieces. Cut "nira" or other green leafy vegetable into bite-size pieces.
  2. Immerse bean sprouts in boiling water for a minute or two.
  3. Drain bean sprouts and mix with grated garlic, sesame oil and salt
  4. Prepare sauce
  5. Heat sesame oil in frying pan/skillet. Cook beef and leafy vegetable in oil very quickly.
  6. Empty skillet and add 1 tbsp of sesame oil. Place cold rice, spreading the rice evenly over the skillet. Pat it gently until the bottom of the rice becomes brown and crisp.
  7. Put back beef, green vegetable, bean sprouts and kimchi on top of the rice.
  8. Pour sauce above them. Drop an egg yolk on top. Raise to high heat. After a few seconds, turn off heat and serve.
  9. Mix everything at the table and serve.

The ingredients can be changed easily (chicken, pork, seafood, etc./any leafy vegetable) but don't forget the kimchi! The amount of hot paste can also be adjusted to your liking. In fact, choice of basic ingredients is up to you, just follow the order when cooking and make sure you have enough of the sauce (which is the key flavor of the dish). 👍

Authentic bibimbap looks like this:

My recipe is served in a skillet. 😌
 

misa.j

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Hi epigene!
Oooh, your bibimbap recipe looks so good! I really love Korean food, but I never got creative enough to improvise the ingredients to make one. Thanks so much for posting it.
Everything in your recipe is available in the States except gochujang which I can mail-order.
I definately have to try it.
 

Davey

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aaaah the HOT POT BI BIM BAP is really nice, i ate heaps of it when i was in australia!!!
 

epigene

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I'm glad you like it, misa-san! Hope you enjoy my recipe, too, dutch!

I was reminded of this next recipe when I read the thread on "unagi no kabayaki." This is dedicated to all those who can't but want to eat kabayaki--even if it's not real eel... 😌

Kabayaki-don (for 4 (Japanese-size) servings 😊 )
  • 4 fillets of fish (preferably blue-skinned fish like sardine (medium-sized), saury or mackerel)
  • Flour
  • Oil (for frying)
  • Soy sauce & mirin - 2 tablespoons each
  • Sake (or dry sherry) - 1 tablespoon
  • Sugar - 2 teaspoons
  • (Optional) Shiitake or any other mushroom - 8 pieces, depending on size
  • (Optional) Shishito pepper (or sweet bell pepper) - 8 bite-size pieces
* If mirin (fermented, sweet sake seasoning) is not available, mixing sake (or dry sherry) with sugar will do.

(1) Make sure the fillet is deboned and dressed for cooking. Sprinkle the fillets with 2 tablespoons of soy sauce and 2 teaspoons of juice from grated ginger.
(2) Pat the fillets dry with paper towel or cloth. Coat with flour.
(3) Prepare pan with oil (any kind of cooking oil is OK, unless it has a strong scent) for deep-frying.
(4) Fry fillets in oil until brown and crisp.
(5) In another pot, mix soy sauce, mirin, sugar and sake in the list of ingredients. Heat until the liquid starts to bubble.
(6) Put in the freshly fried fillets into the liquid. Remove after the fillets are fully coated with the sauce.
(7) Place fillet on top of freshly cooked rice. Pour sauce in the pan over it. Garnish with sauteed mushrooms & sweet green pepper.
(8) Serve, preferably with sansho (ナスRナセツ」) powder.

The recipe for the sauce is standard. You may want to make more of the sauce and drench rice with it--like I do! :p
The frying and the sauce making must be synchronized. It is best when everything is piping hot.
Also, if you don't like the idea of deep-frying, you can sautee the fillet in a skillet until brown. I personally prefer deep-frying because it makes the fillet crunchy. 👍
This recipe is much better than eating those frozen or vacuum-packed eels... 😊

A sample I found on the Web, though it has too much of the saury fillet on top, I think:
 

misa.j

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epigene! Thanks for the recipe. I used to work at "Unagi-ya" when I was in high school; it was small but well-equipped. They steamed skewered Unagi, dipped in the sauce before it was broiled over hot coal, which is a good way because Unagi is high in fat, but it is a lot of process to do at home.
Your recipe is perfect for home cooked "Kabayaki", I never thought about cooking it that way.

Here is anothe recipe by me;

Broiled salmon stuffed with dill butter
For the butter:
Chop up about a hand full of dill.
Mix butter(2 tbsps/ serving) and dill with a fork.
Roll the butter into the shape of a finger and freeze it.

For the salmon:
Make long slits on the inside part of a steak.
Stuff the butter in.
Season with salt and freshly ground black pepper.

Heat olive oil that covers the bottom of the skilet over med-high heat.
Pan-fry the salmon without turning to avoid the butter to leak until brown on the bottom.
Put the skilet in the broiler and finish cooking.

Serve it with roasted garlic mashed potatos.
 

Kara_Nari

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Wow this is making me really hungry! Im going to go and check that the rice cooker is empty, then im going to cook the first one that misa posted... what is the name of that by the way? I use to cook it in New Zealand, I just love it!
Hmm then I could just be lazy if the rice cooker isnt empty and go and have bibimbab!
I love Dolsot bibimbab, thats the one in the hot stone bowl, and it makes the rice at the bottom go crunchy :D
Maybe you can get Gochujang from a chinese supermarket? There must be plenty of Korean convenience stores in the States?
Let me see if I can find a recipe for gochujang... just bought a fantastic Korean cookbook....
 

Kara_Nari

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No, doesnt have it, just variations of different flavours....
 

misa.j

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Kara,
The rice recipe I posted is called "Takikomi-gohan". It is ridiculously easy to make. I hope you enjoy it.

I have been thinking about raw oysters a lot recently. It is almost impossible to find them where I live, but they are so good. I had them in April for the first time since I left Japan, and I just devoured them.
 

Kara_Nari

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Ugh, I dont like raw or cooked oysters, you would have loved to have gone to a restaurant I used to work at in NZ, it was a seafood buffet (but expensive) with gazillions of raw oysters.
I was horrified once when I ordered Bossam, its sort of like boiled pork, with kimchi and you wrap it in lettuce. So delicious and soft, but sometimes they make the kimchi with raw oysters, I got such a fright!!!! So now, I stick to the side dish kimchi.
I really should stop coming to these food threads before lunch and dinner.
Oh well im ordering in today.... first time to try ringing up and ordering! I dont even know what road I live on!
 
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If it is called "autumn" in Japan, they will be "autumn of appetite", "autumn of movement", and "autumn of reading."

Autumn taste.
A chestnut, a matsutake mushroom, a shiitake, a sweet potato
An apple, a pear tree, a grape, a mandarin orange, a fruit of a persimmon
A saury, a bonito, a salmon, a snow crab

Since new buckwheat flour will be harvested in Japan in October, buckwheat noodles are the most delicious seasons.
 

pipokun

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Try Kaki persimmon with wasabi and soy sauce.




I ate this as an entree at an authentic Japanese restaurant.
 

epigene

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Hi pippokun!

I love your creative recipes! 👍

What kind of kaki was it? I'd like to know the variety, because the taste differs a lot by variety. 🙂
 

pipokun

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It was the flat and seedless kaki I ate at the restaurant and cooked at home.

In some countries like Italy or France, you may easily find Japanese Kaki, but it seems to me that it is too ripen for Japanese. It's texture is a bit too soft.

I suppose Japanese like the juicy kaki with good texture, not crispy but something like that. I love the "Shakitto shita" texture of kaki and nashi.
 

Kara_Nari

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Yes, I much prefer juicy Kaki, however usually I have only eaten it when its still a bit crispy.
Mmmmmm I really really love Nashi too, but they are SOOOO expensive here! However they are also REALLY big! Back in New Zealand a Nashi is maybe the size of a closed fist, but really cheap (same with all fruit and veges).

Ok, while I have 2kg of Kimchi sitting next to me, im wondering if in Japan you make any special dishes with Kimchi. I know that you make soups and stews, but are there any unusual dishes that you will cook with kimchi inside? Preferably with other fall ingredients.
 

pipokun

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Kara_Nari said:
Yes, I much prefer juicy Kaki, however usually I have only eaten it when its still a bit crispy.
Mmmmmm I really really love Nashi too, but they are SOOOO expensive here! However they are also REALLY big! Back in New Zealand a Nashi is maybe the size of a closed fist, but really cheap (same with all fruit and veges).

Ok, while I have 2kg of Kimchi sitting next to me, im wondering if in Japan you make any special dishes with Kimchi. I know that you make soups and stews, but are there any unusual dishes that you will cook with kimchi inside? Preferably with other fall ingredients.
fermented food + fermented food is not equal 2X delicious, but 4X or greater in taste.
What is the most famous or infamous fermented food in Japan?

As my portfolio, I posted a Nashi recipe, Nashi pear compote with your rice cooker, in the JT before. Just take a look.
 

Kamakiri

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Kara_Nari said:
Ok, while I have 2kg of Kimchi sitting next to me, im wondering if in Japan you make any special dishes with Kimchi. I know that you make soups and stews, but are there any unusual dishes that you will cook with kimchi inside? Preferably with other fall ingredients.
I know it's far from unusual, but you can make kimchi gyoza and then freeze them if you were looking to get rid of it soon! you can throw in other foods, but i don't think any fall favorites would taste good with kimchi 😌 . i'll have to think about this some more! i love kimchi recipes!!
 

Kara_Nari

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Mmm Kimchi gyoza is so delicious!
I really like fried (not too much oil) kimchi with onion, and pork sprinkled with sesame, and then you put it on a plate with tofu (uncooked). Yum yum!!!
 

chedie

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Oh my goodness! Your recipes are making me very hungry!!! :p
 
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