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e're seriously considering moving to Japan, please help

furio

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Hi Every One,

me and my girlfriend are seriously considering leaving Belgium for Japan.

We both graduate this year (I'm in PR, Marketing..., she's a nutritionist).

I have a strong computer literacy (I always been on it + I did 2 year in college but then I decided that I couldnt do it all my life) I can program in delphi.
Work experience.. well aside stuff like waiter,... I used to sell pension plans, I did many internships (also in the Belgium Japan association), some with excellent reviews about my skills and potentialities.

I speak fluently French Italian Spanish English and I know some Dutch German and Japanese (I intend to improve up to conversation level)

My girlfriend speaks French, Italian and a bit of English. she's willing to improve her English and take intense classes of Japanese before leaving. She's ready to start as a waitress or language teacher before finding something in her field (like some kind of medical assistence...).

So, I please ask your opinion and experience about this:

Do I have any chance to find a good job from here? so I can leave with a proper visa, a guarantor to find a place and a good income?

Or We should just leave with a working holiday thing and some money in our pockets (like after working a year here) and hope for the best?

We really don't wanna get stuck in teaching jobs.
 

Zirdante

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First you should check your visa eligibility, and read some posts on the forums, there is a ton of info to be found in here, rather than to have everyone ask the same questions over and over.
 

furio

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First you should check your visa eligibility, and read some posts on the forums, there is a ton of info to be found in here, rather than to have everyone ask the same questions over and over.

Thanks Zirdante, I'm currently reading lots of posts. Sorry for the trouble.

I thought to create a new post because we are a couple leaving together with no idea for the Future. I'm 24 and Elodie is 22, we're both ready to sacrifice for some time because we really believe it's worth it.

We are realistic, moving to Japan FOREVER is not the goal itself, but living in Japan with dreams and ambition is, like you would do in your home country.

Thank you
 

furio

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Well after hours reading, I've found no concrete example in my field or my girlfriend's. maybe a link?

If you can share something about PR and Marketing or Nutrition it would help a lot.
 

orochi

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With PR, marketing, or nutrition, my guess is that you will have a hard time coming here and then finding a job. Without near-fluent Japanese, you just aren't going to be a good prospective to Japanese employers.

Your best bet might be to find work in your home country. Find a company that has a lot of operations overseas, and hopefully a big office in Japan. Then hope for a transfer.

Or look for a language-teaching job. Then come over for a few years doing that. After your Japanese has improved, you could start looking around again.
 

furio

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Orochi I think you're right on language thing
even if I saw a few ads looking for daily conversation level.

Big companies in Brussels don't send people abroad like they use to, especially young ones but maybe it would be useful as an experience. It would give a first place to look for when in Japan maybe?

Honestly I think that I'll manage to find a real job, I'm the kind of guy that always works something out, that's why I've lost a few year changing my studies from IT to PR cause it's a really wide field and it suits me.
I had wonderful collaborations with Jap expats here (I know it's really not the same) but I bound easily even with shy people. I think they always saw me like this Italian guy you could ask anything. I guess it's because I always show who I really am (this could be an advice for people having a hard time to adapt anywhere, new company, new country,...) I have a strong Italian background I never hide it and I stay complete open minded about other people perspective. Then of course you have to demonstrate that your work is worth it.
I feel like a foreigner in the country I was born (Belgium) but it's OK, it was harder to fake being a real north European plus nobody would give me credit. So I don't intend to become Japanese but to adapt at all level to japanese people and society.

I'm really changing the subject here... sorry :d

What we want is to relocate, I have opportunities in the states and in Spain but Japan is we want.

I can't take the responsibility to let my girlfriend live without any stability in a country where she will have more troubles then me to adapt. I'm lucky because I learned 3 languages as a child, and those who had the same experience would agree in saying that it allows to easily think in language you speak . But it's not her case.

So can you tell me if a job as a nurse in international schools or whatever is feasible?. It would be great if she could find that kind of work. It would really smooth her transition to a new language and culture.

Thanks in advance to everyone.

Orochi I think you're right on language thing
even if I saw a few ads looking for daily conversation level.

Big companies in Brussels don't send people abroad like they use to, especially young ones but maybe it would be useful as an experience. It would give a first place to look for when in Japan maybe?

Honestly I think that I'll manage to find a real job, I'm the kind of guy that always works something out, that's why I've lost a few year changing my studies from IT to PR cause it's a really wide field and it suits me.

I had wonderful collaborations with Jap expats here (I know it's really not the same) but I bound easily even with shy people. I think they always saw me like this Italian guy you could ask anything. I guess it's because I always show who I really am (this could be an advice for people having a hard time to adapt anywhere, new company, new country,...) I have a strong Italian background I never hide it and I stay complete open minded about other people perspective. Then of course you have to demonstrate that your work is worth it.

I feel like a foreigner in the country I was born (Belgium) but it's OK, it was harder to fake being a real north European plus nobody would give me credit.

So I don't intend to become Japanese but to adapt at all level to japanese people and society.

I'm really changing the subject here... sorry :d

What we want is to relocate, I have opportunities in the states and in Spain but Japan is we want.

I can't take the responsibility to let my girlfriend live without any stability in a country where she will have more troubles then me to adapt. I'm lucky because I learned 3 languages as a child, and those who had the same experience would agree in saying that it allows to easily think in language you speak . But it's not her case.

So can you tell me if a job as a nurse in international schools or whatever is feasible?. It would be great if she could find that kind of work. It would really smooth her transition to a new language and culture.

Thanks in advance to everyone.
 
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orochi

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I have a hard time seeing her hired as a nurse if she is unable to communicate with the patients.
 

furio

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some places must exist where she could speak French or English even with only basics in Japanese. Here in Brussel there is the European School where classes are given in english and in some cases in the native language of the students.

I heard there is a French Japanese high school in Tokyo.

Like in any other school they have a nurse or someone responsible for their medical attention.

I guess I'm targeting something too precise and unusual. Thank you anyways for your feedback because it's probably what people is gonna think. It means that maybe she can't aim this without a serious alternative...

Does anyone have information about the nurse thing?
(it doesn't mean we shouldn't try :d:d)
 

orochi

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That sort of job would be insanely difficult to get, I think.
You'd need connections and/or the best certification and degree possible.

Japanese language skills are going to be necessary unless:
1) You are teaching a language besides Japanese.
2) You are transferred via your foreign-owned company.
3) You find work for a non-Japanese company in Japan and they are willing to hire you from your home country.

Does anyone have information about the nurse thing?

You need to do your own homework here. Start with Google and look for foreign schools in Tokyo. Then e-mail or call them up to see if they are hiring.
 

nanook

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Your girlfriend will only be allowed to work as a nurse in Japan, if she is a qualified nurse under Japanese law. Think about it: Every description of all the little medicine bottles and pill boxes are in Japanese scribble only. In order for anyone to trust their kids to your girlfriend's care, they would have to be convinced, that she always chooses the right box or bottle in every emergency. I am afraid, a Belgian qualification will not suffice.

Google has more on that
All the best
 

Glenski

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Do I have any chance to find a good job from here? so I can leave with a proper visa, a guarantor to find a place and a good income?
Or We should just leave with a working holiday thing and some money in our pockets (like after working a year here) and hope for the best?
We really don't wanna get stuck in teaching jobs.


#1, you have just offended this teacher by saying "stuck". Thanks a lot on behalf of every teacher here.

#2, Belgians are not eligible for the working holiday visa.

#3, non-teaching jobs usually require high fluency in Japanese. Medical professionals will probably need it far more than you, and a recent Japan Times newspaper article supports that. It surveyed hospitals looking for foreign nurses, and one of their major fears was the simple act of communication. Even nutritionists will need to know how to communicate with each other, doctors, nurses, and patients in Japanese. You might want to look into what licensing is also required, and I think it will be very difficult to get even with Japanese skills.

#4, as for you, you may have had no problems getting work before, but has that included working abroad where you didn't know the local language (and couldn't even sound out the pronunciation by looking at the characters)? If you can't find a branch office here that is hiring from your home country, you are going to be hard-pressed. Even if you do find one, an intracompany transfer visa requires that you work in your home country for a year at that place before transferring. Yes, there are jobs here that don't require Japanese in your field, but they are limited, and you will probably need a lot of experience to be considered. I mean, who is going to send a rookie overseas, spending money on them, and sponsoring their work visa?

I had wonderful collaborations with Jap expats here
May I make a suggestion here? Please don't use the word "Jap" even in discussion forums. It's terribly offensive. If you are too lazy to type the whole word, just type "J".
 

Pachipro

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Good info Glenski. I couldn't have said it better myself.

No Japanese? You can forget about finding employment outside of teaching English or your native language and what's wrong with that anyway? Many are glad to be "stuck" with teaching for the opportunity to remain in the country or until they gain a firm grasp of the language. Without a firm grasp of the language your chances of finding employment in the PR field are virtually nil.

Your girlfriend may, and that is a big may, be able to find a job with a hospital or clinic that deals with mainly foreigners where Japanese would not be required, but you'll really have to do your research to find something like that and whether her credentials would be accepted.
 

furio

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First of all thank you for your precious informations.
As some of you said, communication with patients and so on is very important, that's why I thought of a job where a little japanese is required like you mentioned. I really am going to look for more info about that.
Of course no company is gonna send me abroad as a complete rookie, that's why I'm here, not to miss opportunities, even remote ones.
as for this
#1, you have just offended this teacher by saying "stuck". Thanks a lot on behalf of every teacher here./QUOTE]
People need to relax a moment. Stop getting mad at your keyboard.
who offended who? What are talking about?
I personally admire teachers because they do a difficult and ungrateful job, being a teacher is more than teaching something, it's also about being a role model to younger people. It takes will, patience and strength. I guess it's really full fulling when you see the result of your professional and human "investment".
All of this is great but I still don't wanna get stuck in a teaching position, what is the problem??☝
I'm not fit to be a teacher and it's not what I want.
Being a teacher is a wonderful experience (I did it a couple of times to help out) and YES it is a respectful way to start in Japan, it gives time to adjust and helps with the money but why is it wrong to think that I don't want to be stuck doing something I don't want??
Any of you guys have ever had a lousy teacher? Now I realize that most of lousy teachers were waiting for the bell to ring as much as me. Because they were in a place they didn't like.
I don't want a young women or man feeling that way because of me.
I apologize to all the good teachers that have been offended by the word "stuck"
I thank the person that pointed out the word "stuck" thanks to him I got the chance to express my gratitude to a category that deserve it. I never expressed myself on this subject before, I'm glad I've done it. So thank you for being so uptight but you still need to Take it easy............................
Voilツ・ Orochi thanks for your crystal clear answers.
Ja ne..

by the way I'm not Belgian, I still need to check for the Visa.
 
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JimmySeal

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Off Topic (sorry!)

furio said:
We really don't wanna get stuck in teaching jobs.

#1, you have just offended this teacher by saying "stuck". Thanks a lot on behalf of every teacher here.

I know I've similarly offended you before. Is there something so terribly wrong about not having an interest in a certain line of work? Not every type of job is right for everybody, no matter how respectable it is. I would never want to be "stuck" in a job as a bomb squad technician or a proctologist, but that doesn't mean I think those jobs are beneath me.

Having a lack of interest in a certain profession and looking down on it are two completely different things.



(back on topic)
[removed...confused this thread with another one]
 
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Pachipro

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Very good explaination of your reasoning there furio and I kind of understand you as I myself would hate to be "stuck" in the position of a "salaryman" or even an executive, as I've been there, done that, and it was not my cup of tea. But it paid the bills for the time being until I found something I thoroughly enjoyed.

Anyway, good luck to you in reaching your dream. It may be difficult, but it's not impossible!
 
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