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Amigo

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I was reading an article and came up against the sentence "he dove into the pool..."
What does have a dove to do with diving into a pool?
Maybe a misprint with "dived"? Maybe dove is also a verb, like "duck"?
Anyway in that case it would be "he doved into the pool" :mad:
I don't understand.
 

Uncle Frank

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I'm no English expert.

I think it has to do with tense or when the action was preformed.
Before he actually jumped= He is diving into the pool.
Just jumped= He dived into the pool.
Already jumped in earlier/in the past= He dove into the pool.

I'm sure there is a more educated way of putting it, so don't trust just my answer.

Uncle Frank
 

Amigo

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Thank you very much to both of you.

So, there are two past tenses for "To dive". Cool.

I have always seen "dived" as the past tense of dive, but never "dove" (until now) :eek:
 

Putrefaction

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I'm American born and I can safely say I have never seen or heard "dived" before. I think once, when scuba diving...nope.

Where have you heard dived?
 

Amigo

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In bournemouth (south of England) I spent 6 mounths studying English there.
Everytime I would go to the beach I would hear everybody to say "I dived..." and also in the school I never heard about "dove" as a past tense of "to dive".
Futhermore, "dive" is not an irregular verb according to the irregular verbs list that I was given by the teachers to study. That's why I was confused.
Now that I got that article an becki_kanou has suggested to have a look the word in a dictionary I see there are just two different past tenses.
 

undrentide

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According to Longman Online dictionary (basically British English), dived is the past tense and dove is also used in American English.

dive | meaning of dive in Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English | LDOCE
dive1
_20_da_FBv_gif-1.jpg
past tense dived also dove
_20_d_EB_v_20_24_A0do_v_gif-1.jpg
AmE, past participle dived

So both dived and dove seem to be correct. :)
 

Uncle Frank

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I always had trouble with spelling & grammar.

I am always truely amazed at our JREF members who do so well with English as a second language. Here I am, born and raised in the US and I failed high school English 2 years in a row. When it comes to spelling and grammar, common sense often does not work and you just have to memorize a bunch of rules, UGH! If I live to be 100, I will still be trying to learn to spell correctly and use correct grammar.

Uncle Frank

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Tomii515

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I have never heard "dived" before. I tried saying "I dived into the pool." but it just sounds weird to me. I've only ever heard dove. Maybe is just a a different dialect thing, since, as AMIGO said, he heard dived, but never dove, in England. I really don't know, but sometimes native speaker make their mistakes... I mean, my mom says "stoleded" instead of "stole."

May it also be noted, if it wasn't already, that the past tence of "dive" (dove) is pronounced differently (in American pronounciation, for the northeast of the USA) than the bird, the dove.

The "o" is a long "o", or in IPA, /oʊ/. So the pronounciation of the word dove is "dohv" (/doʊv/).
 

pugtm

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I have never heard "dived" before. I tried saying "I dived into the pool." but it just sounds weird to me. I've only ever heard dove. Maybe is just a a different dialect thing, since, as AMIGO said, he heard dived, but never dove, in England. I really don't know, but sometimes native speaker make their mistakes... I mean, my mom says "stoleded" instead of "stole."
May it also be noted, if it wasn't already, that the past tence of "dive" (dove) is pronounced differently (in American pronounciation, for the northeast of the USA) than the bird, the dove.
The "o" is a long "o", or in IPA, /oʊ/. So the pronounciation of the word dove is "dohv" (/doʊv/).

No they dived into the water, is perfectly correct as well.
Usage Note: Either dove or dived is acceptable as the past tense of dive. Usage preferences show regional distribution, although both forms are heard throughout the United States. According to the Dictionary of American Regional English, in the North, dove is more prevalent; in the South Midland, dived. Dived is actually the earlier form, and the emergence of dove may appear anomalous in light of the general tendencies of change in English verb forms. Old English had two classes of verbs: strong verbs, whose past tense was indicated by a change in their vowel (a process that survives in such present-day English verbs as drive/drove or fling/flung); and weak verbs, whose past was formed with a suffix related to -ed in Modern English (as in present-day English live/lived and move/moved). Since the Old English period, many verbs have changed from the strong pattern to the weak one; for example, the past tense of step, formerly stop, became stepped. Over the years, in fact, the weak pattern has become so prevalent that we use the term regular to refer to verbs that form their past tense by suffixation of -ed. However, there have occasionally been changes in the other direction: the past tense of wear, now wore, was once werede, and that of spit, now spat, was once spitede. The development of dove is an additional example of the small group of verbs that have swum against the historical tide.
 

Amigo

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I am always truely amazed at our JREF members who do so well with English as a second language. Here I am, born and raised in the US and I failed high school English 2 years in a row. When it comes to spelling and grammar, common sense often does not work and you just have to memorize a bunch of rules, UGH! If I live to be 100, I will still be trying to learn to spell correctly and use correct grammar.
Uncle Frank
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Hey! Uncle Frank, don't you tell. It happens to me with Spanish as well!😊
because I don't revise Spanish, whereas I need to revise English to keep a competent level.
I like learning languages but I confess I'm not very good at them.
Undrentide said:
According to Longman Online dictionary (basically British English), dived is the past tense and dove is also used in American English.
dive | meaning of dive in Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English | LDOCE
dive1 past tense dived also dove AmE, past participle dived
So both dived and dove seem to be correct.
Thank you, Undrentide. It didn't occur to me that it could have been a difference between BrE and AmE.
Thank you to everybody!!🙂
 
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Raurtom

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As far as I know it's a matter of choosing which you preffer, he dived is Brittish English, he dove is American English... you're free to choose which you want to use.
 

Putrefaction

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Yep, and either way you look at it you're fine.

One question...how do they say the past tense of "drive"?

I always had trouble with spelling & grammar.
I am always truely amazed at our JREF members who do so well with English as a second language. Here I am, born and raised in the US and I failed high school English 2 years in a row. When it comes to spelling and grammar, common sense often does not work and you just have to memorize a bunch of rules, UGH! If I live to be 100, I will still be trying to learn to spell correctly and use correct grammar.

Uncle Frank

Haha me too! I suck at English, I'm probably worse than anyone here!
 

Amigo

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aren't they for every verb? I remember learning some three colons for every verb...? what was that?

Do you mean past and past participle tenses?

I was only refering to past tense.
 

undrentide

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Drove

I think that in this case is the same as AmE.

No, in British English it is also drive-drove-driven.

Sometimes there's difference, sometiems not, between the two "English".
Rather confusing, isn't it?
😌
 

Amigo

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Certainly, you're right.:)

It's something like Japanese from Kanto and Japanese from Kansai, isn't?

When I visited Osaka I heard people to say OOKINI instead of ARIGATOU and TABEHEN instead of TABENAI. :mad:

🙂
 

maushan3

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I have never heard "dived" nor "drived". It probably is used in the UK, though.

I really wish all of Japan used many forms of the Kansai ben as it is a lot more casual and friendly in a way. Nothing compares to being shocked by something and saying... なんでやねん!

Mauricio
 
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I also have never heard of "dived". Maybe it's because we Americans have a way of butchering the English language.

Here is an example sentence:

"The dove saw a hawk and dove into the the bush."
(... to hide. Hawks prey on doves.)

Here the noun "dove" (for the bird) is pronounced duv.
While the action verb "dove" (past tense of dive) is pronounced dōv.

Even though they are written the same way, they have different pronunciation.

When spoken it is very apparent which word is which.
The 'duv' saw a hawk and 'dōv' into the the bush.

Of course they actually wouldn't be spelled that way. I only wrote them that way to show you the difference in pronunciation.

When the sentence is written instead of spoken, with both uses of "dove", it can be confusing to an English student, but it is very apparent which "dove" is pronounced which way to native speakers.

Even still, it will become easier to you the more you see it used.

For instance:

"Hoping to prevent its escape, the bird keeper dove after the dove as it flew away."

Here, I have reversed the order of "dove" and it is:

"Hoping to prevent its escape, the bird keeper 'dōv' after the 'duv' as it flew away."


I hope that helps! :)
 

Kinsao

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I'm British and I always used 'dived', until I was a teenager and read more American books and often saw it written 'dove' but I thought it looked and sounded terribly 'American' as I never heard anyone actually use it in speech. However, now I think it is a more elegant way of saying it. :)
 

Amigo

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Thank you, Indiana Gardener, for taking your time for such a useful explanation!
Kinsao, you just made a good point. I was inspired by it to look for some document about comparing points of BrE to AmE.
Actually a friend of mine who has studied English Philology gave me an interesting list and I'm going to post it in a new thread.
 

Toyoka

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I'm American born and I can safely say I have never seen or heard "dived" before. I think once, when scuba diving...nope.

Where have you heard dived?

I'm English, and I've never even heard of the word "dove" before, it's just grammatically wrong. It's dived in my opinion.
 
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