What's new

Welcome to Japan Reference (JREF) - the community for all Things Japanese.

Join Today! It is fast, simple, and FREE!

Learn Japanese with JapanesePod101.com

Does this make sense?

kinjo

Sempai
Joined
15 Mar 2002
Messages
4,446
Reaction score
31
雨の音 ame no oto (sound of rain?)

what does this translate perfect as...?

please, and thanks

~kisu
 

NANGI

先輩
Joined
8 Jan 2003
Messages
2,280
Reaction score
50
Konnichiwa Kisu-san!
Welcome and Hajimemashite.:)

Yes, "sound of rain" is 雨の音(ame no oto).
And, "the sound of falling rain" is 雨の降る音(ame no furu oto).
"rainy sound" is 雨音(amaoto).

NANGI
 

Maciamo

Twirling dragon
Joined
17 Jul 2002
Messages
3,333
Reaction score
109
What's a rainy sound ? Is that a "rain-like sound" made by something else than rain ?
 

Elizabeth

先輩
Joined
22 Apr 2003
Messages
9,525
Reaction score
131
Originally posted by Maciamo
What's a rainy sound ? Is that a "rain-like sound" made by something else than rain ?
A somewhat humourous extension could also come to mean an indistinct, washed out, "white noise" type sound that more closely resembles wind, rushing water, cresting ocean waves etc but that injects the ambiance of rain or a rainy day. I've only actually seen it used this way in poetry and by some kids, though.
 

NANGI

先輩
Joined
8 Jan 2003
Messages
2,280
Reaction score
50
Konnichiwa Maciamo-san! Elizabeth-san!

Isn't there an expression "rainy sound" in English? Sorry, it's my easy error.:D
I translated "Amaoto" into English literally.😌

In Japan, "ame no oto", "ame no furu oto" and "amaoto" are the same meaning.
Are they the same meaning "sound of rain" and "the sound of falling rain" in English?

And Amaoto means rain so often.
"It has stopped raining" is "Ame ga Yanda" in Japanese literally. But the Japanese say "Amaoto ha Toozakatta" too. "Amaoto ga Toozakaru" is "the sound of falling rain fade away" in English literally. The Japanese like indirect expression.:D

NANGI
 

Elizabeth

先輩
Joined
22 Apr 2003
Messages
9,525
Reaction score
131
Originally posted by NANGI


Isn't there an expression "rainy sound" in English? Sorry, it's my easy error.:D
I translated "Amaoto" into English literally.😌

In Japan, "ame no oto", "ame no furu oto" and "amaoto" are the same meaning.
Are they the same meaning "sound of rain" and "the sound of falling rain" in English?

And Amaoto means rain so often.
"It has stopped raining" is "Ame ga Yanda" in Japanese literally. But the Japanese say "Amaoto ha Toozakatta" too. "Amaoto ga Toozakaru" is "the sound of falling rain fade away" in English literally. The Japanese like indirect expression.:D

NANGI
Konnichiwa Maciamo-san! Nangi-san!

We usually just stick with "sound of rain" in English, as Maciamo-san pointed out, "rainy sound" sounds like something trying to rain that really isn't. Like sounds effects in a play or radio show.


"And Amaoto means rain so often."

This is a little confusing in English, Nangi-san. It sounds like you're saying "amaoto" means "rains a lot" ? or that "amaoto" often means "rain" itself in Japanese, not just its sound?

"Amaoto ha Toozakatta" is lovely. Literarally rain getting further away. And isn't "amaoto ni kieteyuku" also an expression for disappearing into the sound of rain?
 
Last edited:

NANGI

先輩
Joined
8 Jan 2003
Messages
2,280
Reaction score
50
Konnichiwa Elizabeth-san!

Thanks and sorry Elizabeth-san!
I knew "rainy sound" now!

Yes, "amaoto often means "rain" itself in Japanese" is right!

And it is a little bit wrong, "amaoto ni kieteyuku" means "a man (or something)fade into a rain". In this case, "ni" means a direction. Where is a direction? It is a rain. And, yes, "Kieru" means disappear and "Kieteyuku" means "fade away" or "fade into". But there is not the subject in "amaoto ni kieteyuku". "Kare no Ashoto ha amaoto ni kieteyuku" means "His footstep(or footstep nois) fade into a rain".

"rain's disappearing sound" is "ame no kieru oto".
And "amaoto ga kieteyuku" is "the sound of falling rain die away". And "amaoto ga kieteyuku" means "The wet weather getting better".

Sorry, I am no good at abstract explanation.:p

NANGI
 

Elizabeth

先輩
Joined
22 Apr 2003
Messages
9,525
Reaction score
131
Originally posted by NANGI
Konnichiwa Elizabeth-san!

Thanks and sorry Elizabeth-san!
I knew "rainy sound" now!

Yes, "amaoto often means "rain" itself in Japanese" is right!

And it is a little bit wrong, "amaoto ni kieteyuku" means "a man (or something)fade into a rain". In this case, "ni" means a direction. Where is a direction? It is a rain. And, yes, "Kieru" means disappear and "Kieteyuku" means "fade away" or "fade into". But there is not the subject in "amaoto ni kieteyuku". "Kare no Ashoto ha amaoto ni kieteyuku" means "His footstep(or footstep nois) fade into a rain".

"rain's disappearing sound" is "ame no kieru oto".
And "amaoto ga kieteyuku" is "the sound of falling rain die away". And "amaoto ga kieteyuku" means "The wet weather getting better".

Sorry, I am no good at abstract explanation.:p

NANGI
Konnichwa Nangi-san!

Nihongo de abstract explanation wo suru no ga chotto muzukashii desune. Demo anata wa sore ni tsuite zenzen ki ni natte inakutte mo ii desu. :D


Yes, "amaoto often means "rain" itself in Japanese" is right!

Hontou? Amaoto wa imi ga sukunakutomo futatsu aru desune. Amaoto wa ame no futte iru oto imi dake to omottan desu.

:eek:

And it is a little bit wrong, "amaoto ni kieteyuku" means "a man (or something)fade into a rain". In this case, "ni" means a direction. Where is a direction? It is a rain. And, yes, "Kieru" means disappear and "Kieteyuku" means "fade away" or "fade into". But there is not the subject in "amaoto ni kieteyuku". "Kare no Ashoto ha amaoto ni kieteyuku" means "His footstep(or footstep nois) fade into a rain".

Sate, watashi no shippai wo mitsukete jibun de mou henshuu shiyou to shimashitaga.....(I did try to edit my mistake myself first.....):) Sore to "ashioto" no tatoe no igai ni mo "Kanojo no tanoshikatta omoide ga amaoto ni kieteyuku" kou iu fuu ni hyougen mo arimasuka?

Kanari shukantekina hyougen de butsuritekini wa souzou ga muzukashidesune. Nihon no hito wa kou iu fuu ni hyougen ga takusan tsukaimasuka? Donoyouni zutto kono tanoshikatta omoide amaoto ni kieteyuku to omotteta kanaa?

Eigo de wa "Kanojo no tanoshikatta omoide ga kiri/kasumi/moya no naka ni kieteyuku" kou iu fuu ni hyougen ga iemasu. Butsuritekini wa kantan ni souzou ga dekiru to omoimasu.

Elizabeth
 
Last edited:

NANGI

先輩
Joined
8 Jan 2003
Messages
2,280
Reaction score
50
Konnichiwa Elizabeth-san!

Amaoto wa ame no futte iru oto imi dake to omottan desu..

Of course Amaoto is "sound of rain" in literal translation. But it is a figurative expression of "rain".

Sore to "ashioto" no tatoe no igai ni mo "Kanojo no tanoshikatta omoide ga amaoto ni kieteyuku" kou iu fuu ni hyougen mo arimasuka?

An instance, the heroine part with her beloved in the rain. Her beloved leave her and she is left standing there. Her happy memories go away from her into the rain. Yes, "her happy memories" is the demonstrative pronoun of her beloved. But this case is a special case, and this is a poetic expression. Usually we don't say "Kanojo no tanoshikatta omoide ga amaoto ni kieteyuku" in daily life.:p

Eigo de wa "Kanojo no tanoshikatta omoide ga kiri/kasumi/moya no naka ni kieteyuku" kou iu fuu ni hyougen ga iemasu.
It is the same as Japanese.:D

NANGI
 

Elizabeth

先輩
Joined
22 Apr 2003
Messages
9,525
Reaction score
131
Originally posted by NANGI
Konnichiwa Elizabeth-san!

NANGI
Konnichwa Nangi-san!

Of course Amaoto is "sound of rain" in literal translation. But it is a figurative expression of "rain".

What would be the perfect example of this in Japanese?
We also have a lot of expressions about rain in English, right as rain, beg for rain, and especially in the Bible -- God coming down like rain etc -- but the sound of rain is all just the patter of a dripping faucet or stomping in a puddle to us. :D


An instance, the heroine part with her beloved in the rain. Her beloved leave her and she is left standing there. Her happy memories go away from her into the rain. Yes, "her happy memories" is the demonstrative pronoun of her beloved. But this case is a special case, and this is a poetic expression. Usually we don't say "Kanojo no tanoshikatta omoide ga amaoto ni kieteyuku" in daily life.:p

Kore wo yomu to "September Rain" to iu Paul McCartney no uta wo omoidashimashita. Sono uta wo shitte imasuka? Sono kyoku de wa Haru no ame de wa koibito to tsukiatte ita wakareta otoko no hito wa wasureta kanojo no omoide wo kyuu ni oboetemashita. Kare wa kugatsu no ame ni koibito to isshyou ni itta no ni tsuite tanoshikatta omoide ga aru keredo inyu toshite wa haru no ame wa namida (implied) noyoni naru to omoimasu. Wakattane?
:D

😊
 

lexico

Sempai
Joined
22 Dec 2004
Messages
2,335
Reaction score
153
Hello, old thread!

NANGI said:
"rainy sound" is 雨音(amaoto).
This is a very old thread, but I wonder if the following is a workable analogy.

Three ways to string two nouns together; noun#1 = 雨, noun#2 = 音.

1. (adjectival construction of noun#1)-noun#2
雨の音 ame no oto: English using preposition 'of' to connect two nouns as in
'sound of rain'

2. (noun#1 functioning as a limiting modifier)-noun#2
雨音 amaoto: English has no problem with stringing plain nouns together.
'rain sound', e.g. rain dance, rain man, rain check, rain coat

3. (noun#1 functioning as subject of a paticipial clause)-noun#2
雨の降る音 ame no furu oto
'rain-falling sound'

As for the actual sound of rain, it could be rain drops hitting the ground, the road, the grass, pools of water, rooftops, windows, or the sounds of flowing water down the spout, stream, or the sounds of wind associated with monsoon rain. Forms 1. 2. and 3. in a sentence or paragraph each can evoke different sound images by distancing itself from the normal usage. I do not know Japanese to say anything in particular, but it seems to work in other languages I know.
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom