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Do you think I have a chance to get a job in Japan?

Jeanna

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Hi everybody, what do you think about my chances to get a job as an interpreter/English teacher in Japan when I'm not a native English speaker? (I'm czech).
I don't know what to study after my final exams - in my country, at the age of 19/20 you have to do the final exams successfully and then the entrance examination to college or university and there have been stu|dying for 3 years (if you want to have a bachelor's degree or for 5 years - magister. So I have to study till my 25, if I want to get a good job once. Great :/
Anyway, I really wanna live in Japan once. I obviously learn japanese. (I hope you don't think wanna live there just because I'm some kind of anime-lover, that's not true, I had been there with my parents two years ago and I realised it's really beautiful country.)
I thought about teaching English in Japan, but frankly, I don't think my English is good (to be honest, actually is horrible), let alone to teach it. However, I'm only 17 now, so I think it could be better over time.
I also thought about becoming an accountant or a secretary... I'm at a loss. What would you do if you were me? Thanks for any answer.
Have a nice day!
 
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nice gaijin

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Your biggest advantage is that you are thinking about your future at such a young age. Keep studying and keep planning. It's hard to get a teaching job as a non-native speaker, but not impossible. I knew quite a few non-native teachers when I part-timed at Gaba, but I'm not sure if that alone would be enough to make your way in Japan.

Have you looked into the demand for learning Czech? There might be services for private lessons at corporations with remote offices; this kind of job is probably much more demanding than a regular teaching gig, but as it's so specialized it's probably much better paying too (I don't know if this actually exists, just a thought). You've got plenty of time to prepare, good luck.
 

Jeanna

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2 nice gaijin: Thank you very much
In fact, I just realised I won't care if I'll get a job as a postal worker, waitress or something like that...
Yep, I also heard about people teaching Czech language in Japan, but there isn't many Japanese people who want to learn this language. Anyway, you're right, to keep studying and planning is the best way and it's the only thing I can do now...
after all, I'm still a teenager - who knows what I'll want to do and where I'll want to go as an undergraduate. And who knows I will become an undergraduate? :?
However, Japan is my love and I will do my best in Japanese. Wish me luck!
Thanks a lot for answer :)
 

Glenski

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If you want to interpret, that's spoken language. Translating is for written. Which do you want to do?

In either case, and especially for translating, you will need better English than you currently have. You write clearly enough to be understood, but there are still plenty of mistakes.

If you want to interpret/translate a language that is not your own to/from Japanese, you will probably need some experience first, too. Look at the visa requirements.
 

tomoni

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Hello Jeanna

The first barrier that you will face is getting a visa. Since you do not have a 4 year university degree, you do not meet the usually applied standard for a working visa. So if you want to come to Japan you need to consider what visas you might be eligible for (kenshu program, cultural visa or student visa).

Hope that helps
 

Dotanbatan

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Hello Jeanna

My advice would be to complete a bachelor degree in Prague in a technical or scientific field and also study Japanese as intensively as you can. I imagine there would be a university there with exchange agreements for you to study a term or two at a Japanese Uni also.

It looks like there are a good number of Japanese companies operating in your country (almost 250), and if you work hard to get your degree and a good level of Japanese (N3 or N2), you will have an excellent chance of landing a job with one of these companies. You could then work toward a permanent transfer to Japan if you still have a desire to live there.
Keep on improving your English also.

Here is an interesting report and Japanese / Czech business:
Joint Press Conference by the Leaders of Japan and the Czech Republic (Speeches and Statements by Prime Minister Taro Aso)

Good luck with your endeavours.
 

biscuit00

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N3 or N2 actually won't be enough (especially N3, pretty worthless for job hunt). You normally need native level Japanese (N1) to have any shot of landing of good job in Japan.
 

tomoni

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I would say that the J level required varies based upon area of expertise/skill, other languages and the "need" for people with those language skills.

For example for Chinese job seekers because there is a large number of them (and they excel at kanji) JLPT level 1 is the minimum. But for some other nationalities (where there are not many speakers of J with certain skill sets) then JLPT 2 will do the trick. But you red to have some level of expertise PLUS J-language ability if you only have JLPT 2.

For example if you have a masters degree in computer science and programming skills, you will get a job with JLPT 2.

Hope that helps…
 

edogaijin

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I would say that the J level required varies based upon area of expertise/skill, other languages and the "need" for people with those language skills.

For example for Chinese job seekers because there is a large number of them (and they excel at kanji) JLPT level 1 is the minimum. But for some other nationalities (where there are not many speakers of J with certain skill sets) then JLPT 2 will do the trick. But you red to have some level of expertise PLUS J-language ability if you only have JLPT 2.

For example if you have a masters degree in computer science and programming skills, you will get a job with JLPT 2.

Hope that helps…

Seconded. I have a master's in CS from a decent university and can confirm that 日本語能力試験 level 3 is essentially worthless for the job hunt. There are some companies that will hire non-business Japanese speakers, but they're not that common. I'm considering going home to America due to the inability to find work.

Japan is somewhat notorious for having a fairly high wall for foreign laborers. Someday this might all change as Japan will *need* foreign laborers to plug the hole that the next generation of pensioners will leave. That day, however, has not yet arrived.
 

yakineko

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Hi Jeanna,

One way of getting to Japan could also be starting out working for a subsidiary of a Japanese multinational in the CZ.

As Dotanbatan posted, there are plenty of Japanese companies operating in the CZ.

good luck.
 

tomoni

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A few people have commented on the the subsidiary route. I am sorry but I will have to respectfully disagree. Based on my experiences both direct and indirect) There are very few career routes that take an overseas foreigner to Japan for a career in Japan. If you want a career in Japan you must come here and be hired here and make the career here.


There certainly are exceptions, but to make a career here as a seishain (not as a temporary hired gun, or trainee that will be sent back to home country), you need to be hired here in Japan, and earn you way.

cheers
 
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