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December 2015 JLPT Results Available Online

Mike Cash

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Much to my amazement, I not only passed I did fairly well on the thing.

Vocab/Kanji/Grammar 48/60
Reading Comprehension 60/60
Listening Comprehension 57/60

Kanji/Vocab "A"
Grammar "A"

Total 165/180 (works out to 91.6%)

I now officially have no respect for the JLPT. If I can pass N1, then anybody can pass N1.
 

Davey

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Failed.... After all those hours of studying... Very dissapointed....

Guess I have to find another way and try again in July!
 

Mike Cash

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But there's no point in taking a test that doesn't have your respect. Waste of time. :smuggrin:
On a positive note, I'm not going to have a lesser opinion of anyone who doesn't pass it (or even take it to begin with) now that I know how bogus it is.

Failed.... After all those hours of studying... Very dissapointed....

Guess I have to find another way and try again in July!
I can't speak as to the value of study, since I really have done very little studying of Japanese. I think that got reflected in my lower score on the part of the test that would benefit the most from studying. I got better scores on the sections where studying really can't help all that much. I did well on the reading because I have read stacks of Japanese books and read lots of various stuff just in the course of work and daily life. I did alright on the listening because I'm surrounded by people who speak nothing but Japanese and I'm expected to at least kinda-sorta keep up with what's going on and function in that environment.

Try to work in as much real-life practical application as you can. Read stuff. Read lots of stuff. Read lots of stuff without looking things up. Get your listening practice in situations that require you to be an active participant instead of just a passive listener. What is wanted in most cases, I think, is simply greater exposure to the language and more active interaction using the language. I passed the test strictly on the strength of massive amounts of exposure. If I had to take the test based on what I have sat down and formally studied I very seriously doubt I could pass N3.
 

madphysicist

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Does anyone who took the test overseas have access to the result?

I took it at SOAS in London and their page says the results are up online but the webpage won't load.
 

Mike Cash

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Does anyone who took the test overseas have access to the result?

I took it at SOAS in London and their page says the results are up online but the webpage won't load.
I couldn't access from a mobile deduce. Are you using a regular desktop or laptop to access?
 

madphysicist

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Mike Cash

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Mike Cash

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Yeah I did but it says results for all except specific Asian countries come out at that time. Right now the online results page won't even load.
Two more hours won't kill you.

After the JLPT I turned my attention to preparing for the 漢字検定 (first time, trying 4 and 5) which is coming up Feb 7th. Having that on the horizon put waiting for the JLPT results out of my mind and made the wait much easier.
 

madphysicist

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Two more hours won't kill you.

After the JLPT I turned my attention to preparing for the 漢字検定 (first time, trying 4 and 5) which is coming up Feb 7th. Having that on the horizon put waiting for the JLPT results out of my mind and made the wait much easier.
It nearly did kill me actually haha.

Pass! 139/180. And I was so worried I’d failed… I'm especially surprised that my highest score was in listening and lowest in grammar/vocab, I would have predicted the opposite. (By the way, it's scaled so the percentage score is next to meaningless.)

Unfortunately the JLPT is the only test it’s practical for me to take in Europe. I’m not sure if I’m ready for N1 in July (plus it clashes with a conference I’m supposed to go to…). So not sure what to aim for next.

To your earlier point, I don’t understand why you say you lost respect for it because “anyone could pass it”… anyone can pass just about any exam with enough time and/or motivation. It would be more troubling if it weren’t potentially feasible for anyone to pass, because that would be a very badly-designed exam. I do happen to think the JLPT has some big flaws, but nonetheless - it’s surely better if someone like you who knows Japanese but hasn’t prepared specifically for the test can pass it.

Meanwhile I specifically prepared using past papers and listening tests. It did help a lot I think. And it improved my Japanese generally, because in doing those exercises I came across a lot of new vocab and grammar that I might not have encountered in my usual methods of studying. It also gave me a concrete goal and motivation. So to anyone who failed, I would recommend practising with past papers.
 

Mike Cash

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Pass! 139/180. And I was so worried I’d failed… I'm especially surprised that my highest score was in listening and lowest in grammar/vocab, I would have predicted the opposite. (By the way, it's scaled so the percentage score is next to meaningless.)
Congratulations! I share your joy in passing and admire you for being one of the apparently small group of people who challenge a level appropriate to their skills. (When I used to teach English I learned through students taking the 英検 that there was greater prestige and bragging rights associated with failing a higher level than they had a snowball's chance in hell of passing than with passing a lower level. I am convinced the JLPT suffers the same phenomenon in spades, accounting for the dismal pass percentages).

I realize the percentage score is meaningless in terms of knowing the raw score, but it is easier to wrap my mind around 91.6% than 165/180.

To your earlier point, I don’t understand why you say you lost respect for it because “anyone could pass it”
Partly due to a lifelong belief that everybody can do anything I can do and usually do it better.

My formal Japanese learning consisted of flunking a college class offered aboard my ship when I was in the Navy, and passing the three semesters that were available when I briefly attended university later. I finished studying the sophomore textbook on my own and that is pretty much the full extent of the effort I have put into learning Japanese....not a whole lot. That plus a few years practical experience in Japan were enough to get me a pass on the old Level 2 in 1996 (went with a coworker who wanted company for her misery in case she failed it for the third time, only reason I even took it).

For the last 19 years since then, though, I was very firmly and very sincerely of the opinion that there was no way I could ever pass N1 unless I spent a lot of time studying for it. I have zero need for the N1 in real life, didn't want to study for it, and put off taking it. Last year I decided it would make a nice extra piece of paper to submit with my citizenship paperwork so I registered to take the test. I didn't study or prepare for it. I did buy some study books which I never got around to using, and which I'm now going to donate to the library or something. At any rate, due to my lack of education and preparation I didn't expect to do well. In fact, I was sufficiently concerned I would fail the test that I waited quite a while to confess in @Davey 's thread that I was going to take it. I didn't want to have to come back later and admit I had failed.

I know very well my own limitations and shortcomings in regard to the Japanese language and that fit very well with a perception in my mind of what is appropriate for a level like 2 (or N2). I similarly had a perception that people who have put lots of time and energy into learning Japanese, typically with better facilities and/or materials than I had, must have a far superior knowledge and command of Japanese than I did. "N1>N2...Q.E.D." after all. So the only two possible outcomes, as I mentioned in the other thread, are that I would fail and lose regard for myself (since after all these years I have no excuse for not having learned) or I would pass and lose regard for the value of N1 (since if I can pass it with all my defects then there must be a degree of bogosity to the test).

Adding further to the bogosity of the system and further confirming it in my mind are the laughably low scores required to pass the tests....especially the ability to pass the while thing so long as one clears 19/60 on each section. The whole JLPT system is just the "soft bigotry of low expectations" writ large and on parade. Its going to come across as false modesty or humblebragging but it isn't....I know from decades of daily life and working and living in a real-world "AJATT" environment that my Japanese skills are sorely lacking in many ways. Just the fact that I could pass the highest level test they have set up for us shows me that it is a sham. That with my many faults I not only passed it but placed in probably the 97th or 98th percentile just further drives the point home with me that the whole thing is a mockery and probably does more to stifle Japanese learning than it does to promote it. People tailor their studies to pass the tests and, statistics reveal, generally come up short. People should study/practice to develop their real-world skills irrespective of what some list or guide tells them will be on the test; I suspect they would see better results.

I'm glad to finally have the unfinished business of having been struck at Level 2 for two decades behind me now, but passing N1 has done zero to give me any sort of boost or sense of accomplishment. If anything, it has sort of irked me. Not only was that all they expected gaijins could do....they only expect gaijins to do a little better than half of that to give them a passing grade. I'm not knocking the accomplishments or belittling the efforts of any people who are still studying and working their way up the rungs of the JLPT ladder. My point is just that when you finally do get to the top of it I don't see how anyone could help being disappointed that apparently this (half of this!) is all that is expected of them. That's why I take more satisfaction and pride in having passed Level 4 of the 日本語検定 than I do of having placed in the top 2 or 3% of those who took N1....with three more levels to challenge I know at least they have faith I have the potential to improve. I never felt inspired to study by or for the JLPT, but I am going to work toward trying higher levels of the 日本語検定 and 漢字検定 and largely due to my disillusionment with the JLPT.
 

Kraise

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Ouch, a worthy opponent to me but I failed the N1 this time.

Scored worse in listening, and probably in the last sections of the 読解 sheet ~ I'm going for it again this year haha.

it was fun though.
 

madphysicist

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@Mike Cash
Fair enough you didn't have to prepare for it, but I think being in Japan and using it every day counts as preparation time. To me, the ideal language test would be one that didn't require any specific preparation for the format but tested how good you were at practically using the language.

I understand you think the level is too low and that fits into the Japanese's general "low expectations for foreigners", but I don't see the JLPT as something that's aimed at fluent speakers, more as a measure of progress for learners from beginner to advanced. After all, once you have reached near-native level you can do tests intended for native speakers!

The scaling means the pass mark is not 50%, it will be more like 70-75%. I think I missed quite a few questions just because of lack of time and no repeats on the listening (in real life you can normally ask someone to repeat themselves!) so I think that's reasonable.

I signed up for N2 because I thought I could pass N3 easily and it would give me no motivation to study. I still thought there was a significant chance I would fail it... I guess I had a similar perception about others having better materials and facilities available - I'm studying by myself and only interact with Japanese people on LINE.

(No way I would have gone for N1! Who wants to pay £75 to get nothing? "Oh yeah I took this REALLY difficult Japanese exam" "did you pass?" "...")
 

letslearn

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Hi all,
I received my results today. I only took N4 but I passed! I think I scrapped through with a score of 110 but I was very happy because I felt like another result was coming my way.
I would like to thank everyone on this forum for helping me get this result.
 

madphysicist

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@letslearn
Well done!

N4 is still an achievement, now that you've passed I hope you'll have more confidence to keep learning and improving.
 

letslearn

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@letslearn
Well done!

N4 is still an achievement, now that you've passed I hope you'll have more confidence to keep learning and improving.
Thanks, Yes I will. It was the first Japanese Exam I had taken, so I was really nervous. It took me until the first section was completed to calm down. I swear they increased the tempo of the listening section, time just flew Ha Ha.
 

Mike Cash

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Hi all,
I received my results today. I only took N4 but I passed! I think I scrapped through with a score of 110 but I was very happy because I felt like another result was coming my way.
I would like to thank everyone on this forum for helping me get this result.
Congratulations, I know you've put a lot of work into it. Keep it up!
 

OoTmaster

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I passed N5. 97/180 I think I did fairly well. Getting down to studying Kanji. I know about 250-300 so with that and listening more I'm thinking of either N4 or N3 this year.
 

Mike Cash

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I passed N5. 97/180 I think I did fairly well. Getting down to studying Kanji. I know about 250-300 so with that and listening more I'm thinking of either N4 or N3 this year.
Congratulations. Is the test available only once a year where you are?
 

OoTmaster

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Congratulations. Is the test available only once a year where you are?
I live in the United States of America so it is only available once a year in December. That is why I'm thinking of possibly studying for N3. I've already been studying toward N4 after I took the test and I have a whole year in which to study.
 

Mike Cash

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I live in the United States of America so it is only available once a year in December. That is why I'm thinking of possibly studying for N3. I've already been studying toward N4 after I took the test and I have a whole year in which to study.
I would suggest studying diligently and when the application window rolls around buy both the N4 and N3 official practice exams, take them under the same time conditions as the actual test, and see where you stand before applying.
 
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