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Daily dishes in the countryside of Japan

nice gaijin

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Wow these videos are great, so relaxing and meditative. They make me miss the Japanese countryside and my host mother's cooking! Thank you for sharing the link.

Do you know where the videos are taken?
 
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Do you know where the videos are taken?
I do not know the location.
Possibly from the milk and miso that she uses for cooking, it may be Nagano.
Nagano agricultural cooperative milk, Yatsugatake milk, Kobuchizawa milk, Shinshu miso is used.

There are a forest and a small hot spring and is an ideal place here.
I want to emigrate here if possible. (^^)
 

thomas

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Thanks for sharing the videos! Mouth-watering.

Funny you should talk about emigrating to Nagano: I have been telling my wife I want to move to a Nagano farmhouse once we retire. 🙂:
 
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Funny you should talk about emigrating to Nagano:I have been telling my wife I want to move to a Nagano farmhouse once we retire. 🙂:
Azumino is recommended as a candidate for migration destination in Nagano.
Azumino is characterized by beautiful water and beautiful country scenery.
Azumino is close to Matsumoto-shi.
Matsumoto city is convenient for access to Tokyo and Nagoya.
I would like to answer information about migration if you create a new thread.:emoji_blush:

I intend to write it about the eating habits of the country here.
For example, I want to introduce edible wild plant collecting or fermented food.:emoji_hugging:
 

thomas

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I intend to write it about the eating habits of the country here.
For example, I want to introduce edible wild plant collecting or fermented food.:emoji_hugging:
I’m looking forward to your introduction! You could also create a blog for your series on edible plants and fermented food.

PS: good idea to create a new thread on Nagano. :emoji_thumbsup:
 
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Ume(Plum)-related foods are made in Japanese homes during the period from May to July.

"Umeshu"
  • Traditional recipe:
    • Ume fruit 1 kg
    • Sugar 500g–1 kg (rock/cubes)
    • Shōchū 1.8l
  • After three months in a cold and dark place, it is ready to be consumed (although it is better to wait at least six months)
Umeshu should be allowed to ripen for at least nine months.
How to make Umeshu

"Umeboshi"
An "umeboshi" is a shiozuke (a salted food) of ume (Japanese apricots), which is dried in the sun after being preserved in salt.
While umeshu (ume liquor) is prepared from aoume (unripe ume), umeboshi are made with fruits picked ripe in or around June.
The prominent characteristic common to all types of umeboshi is a strongly acidic taste.
How to make Umeboshi
 

thomas

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An "umeboshi" is a shiozuke (a salted food) of ume (Japanese apricots), which is dried in the sun after being preserved in salt. While umeshu (ume liquor) is prepared from aoume (unripe ume), umeboshi are made with fruits picked ripe in or around June. The prominent characteristic common to all types of umeboshi is a strongly acidic taste.
Thanks for posting this. To me, umeboshi were an acquired taste. While I liked nattou immediately and have it at least once a week - my wife can't stand it - it took me quite a while to get used to umeboshi. It's a perfect supplement for athletes and I always bring some on longer bicycle rides.
 
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johnnyG

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IMG_20180529_074246984.jpg
This was my wife's breakfast this morning, a few leftover greens for the noodles, and a couple other things.

Our daughters ate seasonal tsukushi back in daycare. They'd go out in the morning and collect it, bring it back and the cooks would make it part of lunch.

There are some places out in the hills here that specialize in 山菜. And some others where the owner/cook is a hunter, serving ジビエ type things.

In grade school, one daughter's summer research project was making umeboshi with her grandmother.

**

This is a box on our porch right now (500ml can for scale):

IMG_20180529_193020023_LL.jpg
IMG_20180529_074246984.jpg
 
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