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Could you tell me the difference of these words?

Keith888

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When watching the Japanese dramas, it sounds so cool when hearing the KANTOU people say "1)さあ、2)だってさあ、3)。。。ぜ、4) 。。。ぞ".

Could you tell me the differences of these words?

Thanks a lot.
 

nice gaijin

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ぜ and ぞ are just tacked onto the end of sentences to make it sound more forceful/masculine, like よ on steroids.

さあ and だってさ go before sentences and I interpret them as something like "well," or "you know..." There might be some info out there if you google it but I'm feeling lazy so I'm not gonna bother double checking... the って in だって is the contraction of という, so it can also be reporting something that was said, but it's more often than not just an affectation that doesn't mean anything in particular.
 

Keith888

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Thanks for the explanation.

I did a bit Google search and found Ze has the meaning to express the speaker's own strong feeling or intention; while Zo has the meaning of suggestion or even order.

今年こそ日本に行くぜ。I will definitely go to Japan this year.
今年こそ日本に行くぞ。Let's definitely go to Japan this year.

だってさあ also seems to have the meaning like despite that, despite being said like that, とは言っても。

Any comments?
 

Toritoribe

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It's more likely opposite. ぞ expresses the speaker's strong intention/assertion, and can be used in monologue (saying to themselves). On the other hand, ぜ is usually used to talk to someone else, and rarely used in monologue.
You can think だってさあ as でも.
 

nice gaijin

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if you're using the volitional "let's go," you're more like to hear 行こうぜ

I think of things like だってさ as little phrases that people pepper into their speech habitually that don't necessarily change the meaning of their sentences, like how some people say in english "but you know..." or "...know what I'm saying" constantly.
 
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