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Clearance regarding syntax/ and or pragmatics...

user64344

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Hello, forum.

I am asking you about the degree of correctness of some sentences I have encountered from different sources. I'd like to get some clarity on this.

The first sentence I encountered in a source was denwa doko desu ka for where is the telephone. I then come to a different source telling me that it should be said denwa wa doko desu ka. Another sentence, asoko ni tatemono arimasune, for do you see the building over there was found in the first source. I feel confused of what is correct and what isn't, since the use of (essential?) particles differ.

I've also come across the sentence furoshiki wa arimasu ka for do you have furoshiki, and other sources tell me that it should be said: furoshiki ga arimasu ka. The respective answers where: furoshiki wa arimasen, furoshiki ga arimasen.

Are all these varying sentences respectable? (for their intended meanings)
 

Toritoribe

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Yes, all those sentences you gave are valid.
 

user64344

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Can one say biiru ippon ikura desu ka and not including a wa, since it's a specified number?
 

raikado

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The は、が、を particles can be omitted in everyday life since they are obvious (most of the time, at least). に can also be omitted in some cases.
 

MamaMiki

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Exactly. Sometimes the particle is taken out in speaking. For instance, I don't usually say ケーキが好きです. I just say ケーキ好きです, or even sometimes just ケーキ好き. The particle が and verb です here is obvious, so I leave it out. However, that doesn't mean the particle and verb are gone and never need to be used again. They're still there, just "invisible" or understood. It's a trait of the Japanese language. Less is more. ;D
 

user64344

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Hello again. Thank you for you responses, appreciated.

I am wondering how to say "Taxis in Japan". It's common to say Japan's taxis (nihon no takushii) meaning the very same thing, but if I am talking about taxis that are geographical positioned in Japan, what particle can I use to give a more specific meaning? How do I say "... in japan"). Does nihon no takushii suffice if I am trying to say "Taxis that are in Japan", or will it be mistaken as "Japan's taxis" (which would imply that they can be sold to other countries and effectively be in other countries, whilst a taxi in Japan cannot be in Norway at the same time), or will everything work out fine given the context is understood?

"Japanese taxis in America", how would that be written?

Regards, fragan.
 

letslearn

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Hello again. Thank you for you responses, appreciated.

I am wondering how to say "Taxis in Japan". It's common to say Japan's taxis (nihon no takushii) meaning the very same thing, but if I am talking about taxis that are geographical positioned in Japan, what particle can I use to give a more specific meaning? How do I say "... in japan"). Does nihon no takushii suffice if I am trying to say "Taxis that are in Japan", or will it be mistaken as "Japan's taxis" (which would imply that they can be sold to other countries and effectively be in other countries, whilst a taxi in Japan cannot be in Norway at the same time), or will everything work out fine given the context is understood?

"Japanese taxis in America", how would that be written?

Regards, fragan.
How about.
アメリカには日本のタクシーがある maybe at a car show or something.
 

Toritoribe

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Hello again. Thank you for you responses, appreciated.

I am wondering how to say "Taxis in Japan". It's common to say Japan's taxis (nihon no takushii) meaning the very same thing, but if I am talking about taxis that are geographical positioned in Japan, what particle can I use to give a more specific meaning? How do I say "... in japan"). Does nihon no takushii suffice if I am trying to say "Taxis that are in Japan", or will it be mistaken as "Japan's taxis" (which would imply that they can be sold to other countries and effectively be in other countries, whilst a taxi in Japan cannot be in Norway at the same time), or will everything work out fine given the context is understood?

"Japanese taxis in America", how would that be written?

Regards, fragan.
日本のタクシー [Nihon no takushī] is usually interpreted as "Taxis that are in Japan", not "Taxis that are made in Japan".
I would say アメリカの日本製タクシー [Amerika no Nihon sei takushī] / アメリカにある日本製(の)タクシー [Amerika ni aru Nihon sei (no) takushī] for "Japanese taxis in America".
 
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