What's new

Chatta form?

MtoM

先輩
7 Sep 2003
201
0
26
In a children story I heard the word Kusugucchatta ata the end of the sentence.

I know that its a form of the verb kusuguru: to tickle
And I know the form cha which means te wa:tabete wa ikanai=tabecha ikanai


but what is this chatta form?
 
I always thought it was the past tense of "chau" which is in turn a contraction of "te shimau" (to finish off, express disappointment)...

Learning and Teaching Japanese


It just doesn't make complete sense on the face of it with the tickle example. I'll need to ask someone and get back with you, MtoM.
 
Do you have the full sentence it was in? Probably either I regret tickling too much or I got really, really excited as a result....:giggle:
 
Last edited:
I know chatta is a kind of informal form but I would like to know exactly when is used too. I think chatta is used when -ta form is used.
example,
tabeta = tabechatta
owatta = owachatta
 
I recall hearing that -chatta can be used when the action was not the fault of the person affected (i.e. it just sort of happened that way).
 
Originally posted by Arashi
I recall hearing that -chatta can be used when the action was not the fault of the person affected (i.e. it just sort of happened that way).
Possibly to get across the idea that someone was was overcome by emotion or otherwise couldn't help themselves (Damn! Unfortunately....) you would use "te shimaimashita" or "chatta" (お金を全部使っちゃった、試験のことをすっかり忘れちゃった). Or maybe there are other cases as well such as with the passive (it was forgotten).

And when you happen to meet someone famous you can always brag to your friends something like
~~に会っちゃった. 😄
 
Here is the complete sentence:(The speaker is a child)
あなお ほって、おばあちゃんお うめちゃった。
それから、あしお くすぐっちゃった。

By the way, what is the plain form of うめちゃった?
 
何だか変な文章ですね。 If the speaker talking about himself of course it would be something like I dug a hole, buried (umeru) my grandmother. And (I? it?) tickled the soles of my feet.

By the way, did they actually use お for を?
 
Did they actually use お for を?
No, it is a mistake!
--
Now what is this chau & chatta ???
I still don't anderstand the form...
 
I suppose in this case it could mean got really excited, in the same way you'd say ブッシュ大統領に会っちゃった!

I don't know....is the child talking about himself or someone else?
 
あなを ほって、おばあちゃんを うめちゃった。
それから、あしを くすぐっちゃった。

you can usually get away with translating ちゃった as "completely", or at least think of it like that when you're reading it.

あなを ほって、おばあちゃんを うめちゃった is simply in english "i dug a hole and buried my grandmother in it." it would sound strange if the うめる (bury) wasn't in chatta form and was written as うめたinstead (especially in a children's story!), as burying your grandmother isn't something you do everyday.

それから、あしを くすぐっちゃった i would translate as "and then i tickled and tickled her feet." since to "tickle completely" in english is to "tickle and tickle".
 
Sou desu ne..
Doumo Arigatou gozaimasu okaeri_man,minna-san

Whats about some more examples to make the idea of the chatta (and chau)form as clear as sun!
 
Originally posted by okaeri_man
それから、あしを くすぐっちゃった i would translate as "and then i tickled and tickled her feet." since to "tickle completely" in english is to "tickle and tickle".
Yes, true, it must be the grandmother's feet....おばあさんの足を誰かがくすぐったのですね. as you can't easily tickle oneself. :p


It's my impression as well that "chatta/chau" is used mainly for "te shimaimashita/te shimau" in the Kanto area (not as much in the rest of the country) to get across this idea of "something happening immediately or unexpectedly (unfortunately) or completely with drastic consequences," (お金を全部使っちゃった, I've already used all the money)。 It's often extremely idiomatic, though, as in English we would say someone "went and did or has gone and done something" in a vaguely accusatory tone (Have you already gone and thrown away today's paper as well ?" (今日の新聞も捨てちゃったですか?, Have you totally thrown away all the papers?) or "He's up and gone already," meaning just he's left already but implying it would have been better had he stayed. (もう出ちゃった、もう出かけちゃった)。 It's hard to explain, hopefully someone else will have some better examples...
 
No, the child tickled his grandmother's feet after he buried her in the hole he (digged*) for her
*>>(what is the past & p.p. of the verb dig??
=============
 
Originally posted by okaeri_man
それから、あしを くすぐっちゃった i would translate as "and then i tickled and tickled her feet." since to "tickle completely" in english is to "tickle and tickle".
I asked my tutor about the best translation and here is her response. although she's from the Kansai area and it isn't used much there :


「くすぐっちゃった」は、たとえ1回しかくすぐらなくても使います。だからtickled over and overではありません。ただ「くすぐった。」の崩れた言い方です。ちょっとplayfulな表現と言えるでしょう。友達同士でふざけあって使ったりします。あまり使う場面はないと思いますが。。
 
Kanji de o kakanaide kudasai, boku wa kanji o yomu no ga mada dekimasen.
And also,
=============I recall hearing that -chatta can be used when the action was not the fault of the person affected
==========================================================

Please write some examples using chau & chatta and their translation
And the same examples but without chau & chatta
This is to see the differences between the two cases
 
Originally posted by MtoM
Kanji de o kakanaide kudasai, boku wa kanji o yomu no ga mada dekimasen.
She's basically explaining that "くすぐっちゃった" is a colloquial, (literally broken) playful expression used sometimes between friends as they are joking around or playing tricks on each other. But that there aren't very many contexts in which it commonly used.

So please just learn the basic kanji such as used here before investing so much energy on these very uniquely Japanese, almost untranslatable conversational forms.
 
sore wa sou desu
boku ga kanji o yomu no wa hontou ni amari dekimasen
I know only the first grade kanji ans some more kanji from other grades
demo, kanji wa oboenikui desu ne
 
Originally posted by MtoM
sore wa sou desu
boku ga kanji o yomu no wa hontou ni amari dekimasen
I know only the first grade kanji ans some more kanji from other grades
demo, kanji wa oboenikui desu ne
Tadashiku wa : Boku wa kanji wo yomu no ga amari dekimasen. Hontou ni and amari together is odd because "hontou ni" means really and amari is not so much. You can also say "boku ni wa" if you want to emphasize the fact that it is difficult for you (compared to everyone else). And you don't need "demo" either. OK--more later :)
Ganbatte ne!
 
Thanks

ok, how to say:thank you for the correction ?
is it : tadashiku ni dashite arigatou gozaimasu
 
Originally posted by MtoM
Thanks

ok,how to say:thank you for the correction ?
is it : tadashiku ni dashite arigatou gozaimasu

Sounds correct to me though I'm not sure the ni is needed or not...
 
Originally posted by MtoM
Thanks

ok,how to say:thank you for the correction ?
is it : tadashiku ni dashite arigatou gozaimasu
(tadashiku/machigai wo) teisei shite/naoshite itadaite/kurete arigatou gozaimashita. And more of course as well....🙂
 
Originally posted by beluga
probably can use
boku wa kanji wo yomu koto no ga jitsu ni amari dekimasen ?
Maybe "dekinai da yo" is a better change if you want to make it more emphatic. "Amari (yoku) dekimasen" seems to be more or less a set expression you don't often see other modifiers added to. I don't know exactly how "jitsu ni" sounds in Japanese but the English translation as "indeed" or "really" creates a sort of distant or more formal effect. Of course it'll be simply "kanji ga amari yomenai da yo!" once you learn the potential form...😄
 
Back
Top Bottom