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Building a correct sentence

Frits

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When i translate Dutch into Japanese with Google and I translate it back its a complete mess the words are in a different order and some words are changed its chaos. Can someone please take a look and tell me if they can read the subtitles and tell me if they understand it and if its not to much chaos thank you.

 

nekojita

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Can't look now but if you are using automatic translation it is going to be wrong. It is only a question of how wrong.
 

Frits

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If you translate any related languages like dutch to german or english the loss is not that big i am curious how big the loss is here.
 

nahadef

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The foundations of European languages (except Finnish) are relatively similar, so they aren't so hard for computers to translate. At the moment, they can't translate European language to or from Japanese at all. You'll only get gibberish.
 

Frits

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For example one sentence is "have you been drinking" in dutch "heeft u gedronken" can someone give me the correct japanese translation so i can compare thank you.
 

Toritoribe

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Please use punctuation.

"The translation of a single sentence is correct" doesn't always mean "it fits the context". The mix of polite forms and casual forms sounds odd just by it, for instance.
As for your question, あなたが飲んでいない? can be correct in a context. Although it could be translated as あなたは飲んでいない?, あんた飲んでないの?, 君は飲んでなかったの?, 飲んでたわけじゃないの?, etc. etc.... depending on the context.
 
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Frits

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Thanks for your answer. The guy speaking dutch imitates a singer who speakes with a casual tongue but tries to sound like a aristocrat so that part came through. In dutch there are more ways to adress someone than in english, in your translation i see the same thing in japanese. For instance to a older person "hoe gaat het met u" to a younger person is "hoe gaat het met je ". Nice to be talking about this.
 
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