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Buddhist art exhibition

thomas

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Interesting exhibition held in New York until June 22:

Tracing Buddhist art to Japan via Korea

A landmark exhibit of the Buddhist art of Asia traces the transmission of sculptural forms by Korea to Japan for the first time, putting to rest a long-held belief that Japan got much of its artistic heritage directly from China.

The show at the Japan Society, titled "Transmitting the Forms of Divinity," is not only a turning point in scholarship in regard to a murky area of Asian art history but marks the first collaboration on a large scale by South Korean and Japanese art and archaeological experts.

It is also the first comparative examination of the interdependence of Korean and Japanese art, proving that Korean influence was more than just marginal.

Korea and Japan were antagonistic throughout much of the 20th century due to Japan's occupation and colonization of the Korean peninsula beginning late in the 19th century, followed by the divisive Korean War of 1951-53. The situation has begun to improve in the past decade, culminating in Japan and South Korea's co-hosting the World Cup in 2002.

Despite the contentious political climate that persists in Northeast Asia, the national museums of both countries loaned works to the show, a $2 million cooperative effort by the Japan Society and the Korean Society, non-political American cultural organizations. It is without argument the most important cross-cultural event of the current New York art season and can be seen through June 22.

=> Tracing Buddhist art to Japan via Korea
 

Hoyu

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It is my opinion that there should be absolutely no dispute in regard to the Chinese cultural and artistic influence in Japan. Furthermore, the present day discrimination against Koreans (in general) should not detract from the fact that Korean art and culture had also been quite influential upon the Japanese in the past.

If having even minor exposure to Buddhist art and architecture in Korea, one were to go to Nara to visit some of the earliest temples built in Japan, then the connection should be lucidly clear.

🙂
 

ume

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A landmark exhibit of the Buddhist art of Asia traces the transmission of sculptural forms by Korea to Japan for the first time, putting to rest a long-held belief that Japan got much of its artistic heritage directly from China.

Thomas, I apologize in advance if I didn't read your message carefully🙂

I just wonder who had this kind of idea. Anyone who study Japanese (art) history should know the Korean influence on Japanese culture(therefore art). I think Japanese elementary schools even teach some basic stuff about it.

If the statement was made without much thought, it's too sad.
I'll have to accept it if the statement was made based on what majority of non-Asians think; everything Asian comes from China(ok, it may be true in some degree, but it's too stereo typical).
 

Hoyu

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I am in agreement with Ume that anyone who has studied Japanese art history knows about the Korean influence on Japan. In hindsight I may have read too much into Winship's words. In the UPI article he wrote "It is also the first comparative examination of the interdependence of Korean and Japanese art, proving that Korean influence was more than just marginal." From this statement I guess I took it to mean Winship was implying that the Korean artistic influence upon Japan had been, up until this time, in question.

The Japan Society webpage is very clear when they state:

"The first major international exhibition devoted to a comparative examination of Korean and Japanese Buddhist art, Transmitting the Forms of Divinity explores the formative links between the ancient cultures of Korea and Japan and the early development of Buddhist art in each nation. The exhibition examines the important early relationship between Korea and Japan, from the origins of Korean Buddhist art and its transmission to Japan in the sixth century, to the creation of independent styles and modes of expression in each nation by the ninth century."
 
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Hoyu

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It should probably also be noted here that it was the Chinese Mahayana Buddhist artistic influence upon Korea that inspired what later became known as Korean Buddhist art; and this is what was then brought over to Japan in the earliest days when Buddhism was first introduced to Japan.

This is an excellent example illuminating the Buddha's teachings on the interconnectedness of all phenomena.

🙂
 
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