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Bakufu shrine

nedkelly

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I have read that Yasukuni Shrine does not enshrine the souls of the soldiers who fought for the Tokugawa bakufu during the Boshin War. Can someone tell me whether there is a shrine which honors those soldiers? Also is there a shrine dedicated to the souls of the shinsengumi soldiers?
 

thomas

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It appears that the most prominent members of the Shinsengumi have their tombs in and around Tokyo (in particular western Tokyo).

Excellent info here:

Shinsengumi in Kanto | MustLoveJapan

Kondo Isami seems to have more than one grave. I have visited his first grave erected in Ten'nei-ji Temple (天寧寺) in Aizuwakamatsu.

kondo_isami01.jpg


I'm not sure whether there's a central shrine dedicated to all bakufu soldiers who died in the Boshin War, but Aizu honours it's fallen soldiers, not only those of the Byakkotai, at Iimoriyama

=> Iimoriyama (飯盛山) - Japan Portal
 

caster55

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today's 11th chief priest of Yasukuni shrine is the great-grandchild of the 15th Shogun Yoshinobu
 

Majestic

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caster55

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there is 鎮霊舎(chin rei sha) in Yasukuni shrine and many Gokoku shrine
http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gokoku-jinja

the adjacent Chinreisha "spirit-pacifying" shrine commemorates all of the dead from all wars fought worldwide throughout history.[3]

Yasukuni's chinreisha
20090217-02134.jpg


Chinreisha (鎮霊社?, "Spirit Pacifying Shrine") is a small wooden Shinto shrine located directly south of Yasukuni Shrine's honden (main shrine) in Yasukuni Shrine precinct. It was built in 1965 after a proposition by Yasukuni's main priest, Fujimaro Tsukuba and has an annual festival held on July 13.[1] In 1975, a steel fence was erected around the shrine and it was closed off to the public. This came after an incident on Hokkaidō a year earlier where a shrine was set on fire and after the chief priest at Yasukuni had received intelligence that unknown persons were planning to destroy the Chinreisha.[2][3] It was re-opened for worshipers on October 12, 2006.[3]
The shrine consists of two za, or seats for kami (spirits). One is devoted to all of the Japanese war-dead since 1853 that are not enshrined in Yasukuni Shrine's honden (main shrine). These kami include Japanese men who died fighting against the Imperial Japanese Army in domestic incidences such as the Boshin War. The second za is dedicated to all war dead, regardless of nationality. The enshrined kami in the Chinreisha stand in contrast to those enshrined in Yasukuni's honden because they include enemies of Imperial Japan while Yasukuni Shrine's honden does not.[2]

Chinreisha - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Abe prayed for peace here this time
 

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nedkelly

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Thank you. I am most grateful for this and the other replies. I have learnt much in this forum.
 
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