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Authentic teriyaki sauce recipe using chicken or salmon bones

AdrianLe

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I'm looking for an authentic Teriyaki sauce recipe using chicken or salmon bones.. Help ?
 

Toritoribe

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Do you mean Teriyaki sauce recipe using chicken or salmon bones as an ingredient? If so, Teriyaki sauce is usually made of soy sauce, mirin, sugar and sake.
 

AdrianLe

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Yes I'd use the bones to enhance the flavor, is it possible ? Thanks
 

johnnyG

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Yes I'd use the bones to enhance the flavor, is it possible ? Thanks
What is your source on that?

Why are you even asking this question?

Can you relay a story, or something you heard from somebody who heard something from someone else who heard something from someone else about this, that would give any credence to your question?
 

johnnyG

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Some body told me possible..
So, I'm telling you "not possible" (and I think some others, above, might agree).

Who are you going to believe?
Some body told me possible..
I'm now telling you this is possible:

You can use two shakes of dried bats wings, a tad bit of hexavalent chromium, and a bit of dashi (and some mayonnaise). Whip it up right and you'll have the most authentic teriyaki sauce ever.
 

thomas

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You can use two shakes of dried bats wings, a tad bit of hexavalent chromium, and a bit of dashi (and some mayonnaise). Whip it up right and you'll have the most authentic teriyaki sauce ever.
Thanks for sharing your family recipe, but let’s keep this thread helpful. ;)
 

gtm

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Greetings.

First, please pardon me if i say a few words to those who have been a trifle harsh with you.
My impression is that the Japanese are justly renowned for their unfailing courtesy, kindness and helpfulness to all; especially to strangers trying to negotiate the labyrinths of their truly amazing culture.

Would it not be wonderful to perpetuate that well-deserved reputation and help someone who is sincerely trying to resolve a problem? He would long remember the warmth with which he was received and no matter how initially "erroneous" his query might have appeared, some thoughtful research might have suggested paths he could have pursued to find his own directions, wherever they might have led?

As to someone confidently proclaiming THE GOLDEN ratio for THE TERIYAKI sauce, perhaps other opinions also hold even greater weight, e.g. sans any sugar but 2 shoyu : 2 sake : 3 mirin? Chef Saito :
I am not Japanese, but I love Japan, and Japanese culture. I am woefully ignorant in all respects. My English is poor, wordy and labored. Please pardon what I write below which may be totally incorrect. I hope it may provide a tiny glimmer to our friend.

To our experts in Japanese cooking: Non-Japanese might use the term TERIYAKI in a broader sense than native Japanese, just as native Japanese use terms for Italian pasta dishes that could conceivably surprise an Italian purist. Pasta Napolitano with tomato Ketchup?


Many newcomers to Japanese cooking often pick up ideas from "experts" like Elizabeth Andoh. They might use terms like "teriyaki" in a very broad sense, to include glazing sauces used to dress grilled or pan-seared items with a characteristic [ to them] Japanese flavor!

Elizabeth Andoh, if I remember correctly, gives the recipe for a "TARE" base where chicken wings are charcoal-grilled to pick up a smoky flavor and then braised in a dashi-sake-mirin stock [ +/- ginger, scallions] to extract all the rich umami flavors and gelatin.

I think she says that professionals skewer raw chicken parts on soaked bamboo skewers and constantly dip them in this tare base while grilling on charcoal. This keeps enriching the base over time while the skewered meat becomes richly glazed.

I could be totally wrong about everything I have just written, but I suspect that the gentleman seeking information about a teriyaki sauce using chicken or salmon bones may have come across similar ideas and is trying recreate the method.

Red miso is used in Chinese bbq pork marinades to impart a strong umami flavor [ Chinese Cooking Demystified: Char Siu Pork; Youtube] and perhaps could be used with fish/salmon bones, plus sake, etc. to achieve a tare-like base?

Black Cod with White Miso is a dish made famous by Nobu and Chef John at Food Wishes, Youtube has a modified method using white miso, that also could be modified for use with salmon, or white fish trimmings and frames to create a concentrated tare base for grilling or pan cooking?
 

Mike Cash

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First, please pardon me if i say a few words to those who have been a trifle harsh with you.
My impression is that the Japanese are justly renowned for their unfailing courtesy, kindness and helpfulness to all; especially to strangers trying to negotiate the labyrinths of their truly amazing culture.
The grumpy old man who was harsh with him isn't Japanese.

Would it not be wonderful to perpetuate that well-deserved reputation and help someone who is sincerely trying to resolve a problem? He would long remember the warmth with which he was received and no matter how initially "erroneous" his query might have appeared, some thoughtful research might have suggested paths he could have pursued to find his own directions, wherever they might have led?
Would it not be wonderful if when setting out to lecture others one first ascertained a few basic facts rather than operating from one's unfounded assumptions? Are you old enough to remember Roseanne Roseannadanna?

Welcome to the forum. We're happy to have you with us.
 

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