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Applying for a job that doesn't offer visa support

ariso07

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Don't get mad at me, I have done a lot of homework on visas and job applications. But I am just wondering about this one thing:

Is there any point in applying for jobs in Japan that don't state that they offer visa support? Has anyone that you know of ever gotten a company to agree to offer visa support?

The reason is this: I speak Japanese on a fairly high level (passed N2, took N1 this year). I have browsed several job sites that are used in Japan and found jobs that fit my qualifications perfectly (masters degree in teaching, experience translating, native English level, near-native Japanese skills (I am adding that because most of them don't say anything about Japanese level as they are looking for a native with a high TOEIC score)) But, I don't know if it would be ridiculous to apply for such a job. Has anyone ever gotten a job that way? Like not through Careercross or Gaijinpot but through e-aidem or job direct.

Also, is it any different for jobs on things sites like careercross that are out there for foreigners but don't offer visa support? Is there any point applying?
 

Glenski

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If they merely don't state whether they offer visa support, give it a go, but ask in your cover letter. If they state at that point that they don't support visas, pass.

If they actually state in the ad that they don't offer visa support, then obviously you shouldn't even apply.

Just curious, what sort of job are you looking for? Can't really answer your last paragraph without knowing.
 

Mike Cash

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It sounds like she is looking at sites which specifically target Japanese job candidates. If they wanted foreigners to fill the positions, they would either be wording the ads differently or placing them somewhere else.

In other words, you might think you're just what they're looking for, but you overlook that you're not Japanese....which is going to be a much bigger deal to them than it is to you. Impossible? No, of course not. But you face a hard sale.

Bringing foreign professionals in can be more of a headache than just hiring similar talent locally. Foreigners have a nasty habit of expecting to go home at quitting time, expecting overtime pay, and expecting to actually use their vacation days to take a vacation, among other annoying traits. If they had no practical way around the hassle than to hire a foreigner, they'd already be hunting a foreigner. They fully expect to be able to fill the position with a much-less-hassle Japanese candidate. So why should they be expected to go out of their way and create extra work for themselves when they don't have to?

Still, as they say....you'll never know unless you ask, so put those near-native Japanese skills to work and write some letters and make some calls. After all, the individual prospective employers are the only ones who have any answers on this that really mean anything.

Good luck.
 

Glenski

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If the ad says "native Japanese with high TOEIC score", I would agree with Mike wholeheartedly. Having JLPT N2 is not "near fluent" to many employers, but you never know what they really want. Even so, as Mike pointed out, being Japanese and accepting the business culture without questioning it is probably the reason they asked for a native. Best of luck.
 

Mike Cash

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Just to add a slightly more cheery note: I once got a job at a Japanese company that wasn't even advertising an opening at the time. Just cold-called them.

I once knew a guy who said in high school he and his buddy would walk up to girls in the mall and ask, "Wanna f-word?" I asked him if that didn't result in getting his face slapped. He told me that the few times the tactic actually worked more than made up for the numerous rejections.

So....give 'em a call? You have nothing to lose.
 

ariso07

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I am aware that jobs on career cross that say "no visa support" mean just that. However, as I said, I am talking about job postings aimed at native Japanese. I can't remember which one of you, but I think its Mike that works a regular Japanese job that was not looking to hire a foreigner. But it was my understanding that you are also married to a Japanese woman (maybe?) so visas wouldn't have been an issue. I was kind of wondering whether or not it was possible for someone who didn't have that kind of support (I am happily, though unfortunately from the standpoint of this conversation, married to an American) However, you make a good point about the fact that they are expecting Japanese people. Most of the jobs don't say it, likely because they are not even expecting someone who is not Japanese to apply.

Kinds of jobs: there were a couple in EFL curriculum design positions (I have the experience and degree necessary) with MEXT, and some with ALC doing textbook editing. However, there were also some translator (J>E) positions that I was interested in. I understand that these are all "English" related jobs. However, they are also jobs that weren't looking for an English native speaker. I would like to use my degree to do something other than work in an 英会話学校 (I have already put in my time there). However, I don't know how I could employ my degree to get a job when it seems like all the people who are setting up curriculum and writing textbooks are Japanese. (I personally know some of the American textbook writers but they almost all were already in Japan when they got their jobs, again Japanese marriage).

Hours etc: I work for a Japanese company now and the hours come with the territory. The company is in the U.S., so they know they have to be lenient but they group me with the Japanese because of the position I hold, so the leniency only sometimes applies to me. I understand the difference in work hours and customs but that is what I am looking for right now. I don't want to play the gaijin card anymore.

Japanese level: I know N2 is not that great. But that was almost 4 years ago and I have been working in technical translation in a Japanese-speaking work environment for the last 2 years. I just don't want to lie and say I passed N1 when I haven't yet....(Why does it take so long to get the damn test scores?)

Anyway, sorry to run on so long. I really appreciate the advice from both of you. I will keep my eyes open and take a chance on applying if I don't find something else soon. Thanks again.
 

Glenski

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I am aware that jobs on career cross that say "no visa support" mean just that. However, as I said, I am talking about job postings aimed at native Japanese.
Yes, and you either stop doing that, or brashly, boldly and extremely delicately do what Mike suggested by cold-calling (but I personally feel you will get turned down every time, despite the anecdote about asking girls to get laid).

I can't remember which one of you, but I think its Mike that works a regular Japanese job
I beg your pardon! Since when is teaching at a university not a "regular Japanese job?"

(masters degree in teaching, experience translating...)

I would like to use my degree to do something other than work in an 英会話学校 (I have already put in my time there).
Just what do you feel you are qualified to do with the above?

I don't know how I could employ my degree to get a job when it seems like all the people who are setting up curriculum and writing textbooks are Japanese.
You are mistaken about the latter. Even Japanese publishes like Nanun-do and Shohakusha have foreign writers of their textbooks. Contact them, but if you are merely looking to write textbooks, you won't survive financially. If you want to edit for them, you'll probably need better than JLPT2 (but who knows unless you inquire?). The whole textbook industry is in flux, too, mostly because of the availability of so much material online including from the publishers.

Hours etc: I work for a Japanese company now and the hours come with the territory. The company is in the U.S., so they know they have to be lenient but they group me with the Japanese because of the position I hold, so the leniency only sometimes applies to me. I understand the difference in work hours and customs but that is what I am looking for right now. I don't want to play the gaijin card anymore.
Ok, that's your prerogative, but don't expect to be treated 100 percent equally here. You won't be.
 

Mike Cash

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Nor would she want to be.
 
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