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A verb question

Mirage

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Konnichiwa all, (at work, can't type in Kana, no IME :( )

Anyways, I was wondering if anyone could help me with a basic verb question. In my studies of the first grade's Kanji, I am having difficulty remembering the differences between verbs that sound alike, for example :

上がる agaru
上げる ageru

agaru meaning to climb up, or to go up

ageru meaning to rise up

Its tough to see the difference.. one has a ga, and one a ge.. are there any tips for recognizing which is which?

another example

気にする kinisuru
気になる kininaru

I know suru means to be, so in this case i use "to be on the mind" to remember care about

and naru means to become, so to become on the mind to worry about, are there any more tips like this that can be used to remember words. Like do ga and ge have any special meaning in agaru, and ageru?

I hope i make sense :confused:
 

Mirage

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Thx Elizabeth, but I'm not too concerned with the tense of the word, Just on tips on how to remember the difference between similar looking words. Not only similar looking words, but words that have only one kanji and some Hiragana for the rest. Words with to or more Kanji are a bit easier because you can use some imagination, or vision to memorize; A word like unkai, sea of clouds has the kanji for cloud and the kanji for sea, so its easy. But something like : 引きちぎる : to tear off, which has one Kanji and a bunch of Hiragana is tough to visualize? Is there any tricks?
 

Elizabeth

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Originally posted by Mirage
Thx Elizabeth, but I'm not too concerned with the tense of the word, Just on tips on how to remember the difference between similar looking words. Not only similar looking words, but words that have only one kanji and some Hiragana for the rest. Words with to or more Kanji are a bit easier because you can use some imagination, or vision to memorize; A word like unkai, sea of clouds has the kanji for cloud and the kanji for sea, so its easy. But something like : 引きちぎる : to tear off, which has one Kanji and a bunch of Hiragana is tough to visualize? Is there any tricks?
Well, all verbs (KUN readings) will have hiragana endings so you are going to need to learn to group them by form and tense if you plan on becoming a fluent reader....but I'm the world's absolute worst visualizer of anything so take it for all it's worth. :p. Although actually tear or rip off is usually simply 引き裂く or 破く. I didn't even know about hikichijiru. So, if all else fails never give up looking for a simpler/kanji compound way to say it. :p
 

Mirage

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Yea, thats the problem i guess.. I've notice easier ways to say things as I go along.. problem is how will you know until you come to learn new Kanji. I guess the answer is you don't. Ah well thanks for the replies as always, 🙂

guess its back to the old, keep beating it into your skull until you get it routine :)
 

Elizabeth

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And there is always a simpler way in Japanese ;). The other day on a bad phone line (denwa ga tooin desuga, I can't hear you -- the phone is far way) I tried asking if their phone was not working (Koshou desuka?) or even not in working order (Kono denwa wa tsukaeru joutai ni natte imasuka?) when all you should really say is Warui desuka? (Short for denwa no kakari ga warui desuka? Do we have a bad connection?) Kikoemasuka? Is it bad? Can you hear me? And it's that way for a lot of things, fortunately or we'd all be facing be a mountain that could never be climbed :D
 
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