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A suitable authentic Japanese name for me

milindindia

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Quest for a suitable Japanese name

My actual Indian name is チャクラボルティ・ミリンド (Milind Chakraborty). But with the help of some friends on Hellotalk and Quora, namely Saki-chan, Haru-san, Michiyo-san, Ryu-san, Fukazawa-san and some others, I did a bit of research, taking inspiration from the meaning and history of my original name, and chose a related appropriate Japanese name for me, 転法輪(てぼり)兼蜂(けんぱち). I will be glad if you addressed me as 転法輪 兼蜂 (Kenpachi Tebori) or just けん (Ken) in Japanese. (^_^)

So how did I come up with these names? Here's a background...

My Indian given name is Milind, which is a boy-name meaning a sort of ‘bumblebee’ or ‘honeybee’. Also, as the legend goes, ‘Milind’ is another name to the Hindu deity ‘Krishna’, who used to be a handsome cowherd. He had a lot of cowherd maidens fawning over him during his teens, who are compared to flowers. And he, like a bee, moved from one flower to the other looking for nectar, love. The Kanji for Bee is , and refers to ‘concurrence’ or ‘simultaneously indulging in multiple things’, just like the bee went to multiple flowers.

My Bengali family name is Chakraborty which was a title carried by the clan of people who are descendants of "An Emperor whose chariot wheels roll without obstruction" (This is what the word stands for), based on an ancient tradition in India. The emperor on his chariot would proceed with his horse galloping into different territories, claiming them. In case, someone confronted, a war was waged. And if he could succeed in his conquest, while keeping the wheels of the chariot, the wheel of Dharma, rolling, He was called Chakraborty. This horse was then sacrificed as an offering as a part of a fire ritual. The people with this title generally belonged to the clan of highly learned scholars, Brahmins.

(Again, Chakraborty is 転輪王(てんりんおう – Tenrin'ou) in Japanese) :
転輪聖王 - Wikipedia

(Moreover, ‘Chakra’ in Chakraborty refers to 法輪 - Dharmachakra, and in my story, the wheel of the emperor's chariot represents Dharmachakra, 法輪, which he has to keep rolling, , cutting through various territories and expanding the kingdom of Dharma, righteousness. Anyone non-righteous, who comes in the way shall be taken down. The Emperor who is able to establish such an ideal empire of Dharma or Righteousness in all directions, was termed Chakraborty.)
To my surprise I found out there is actually such a family name in Japan, though rare, 転法輪 (てぼり) .

To top it all off, I found that the Family name - Given name combination of 転法輪 兼蜂 is also pretty lucky as per the calculation based on the number strokes in its Kanji.

IMG_20190729_033924.jpg


What do you guys think?
 

joadbres

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In your chosen given name, you use a mix of on and kun character readings. It is more common (and more expected) to use matching readings: on-on or kun-kun, That would be my recommendation.

Other than that, it looks like a great choice of name.
 

milindindia

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In your chosen given name, you use a mix of on and kun character readings. It is more common (and more expected) to use matching readings: on-on or kun-kun, That would be my recommendation.

Other than that, it looks like a great choice of name.

When I decided on 兼蜂, I thought I will go with the reading 'Kanehachi'. But a Japanese friend of mine told me that people are more likely to read your name as 'Kenpachi' at first glance. Plus, I guess Kanehachi sounds a bit too long and more like a surname.
I remember an Anime character with this given name (Kenpachi), whom I can't recall at the moment. I reckon it was in Bleach.
Moreover, as much as I like the sound of it, my friends can therefore be able to nickname 'Kenpachi' to 'Ken' or 'Ken-kun', the temptation of which I can't resist. I really do like the name, the way it is.
I think I have seen on-kun combinations in names before, is it really that uncommon?
 

milindindia

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In your chosen given name, you use a mix of on and kun character readings. It is more common (and more expected) to use matching readings: on-on or kun-kun, That would be my recommendation.

Other than that, it looks like a great choice of name.

Also, isn't there a thing called Juubakoyomi (重箱読み).

Names like, 総一 (Souichi)、涼子 (Ryouko), have the first character read as On and the second as Kun, don't they?
 

Toritoribe

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a Japanese friend of mine told me that people are more likely to read your name as 'Kenpachi' at first glance.
I, a native Japanese speaker, don't agree with that. Even if rendaku occurs on は, it should be けんち "Kenbachi", as in 女王蜂 "jōō-bachi", 蜜蜂 "mitsubachi" or 雀蜂 "suzumebachi". I would read it Kenhō or Kenpō since the surname seems to be related to Buddhism, and monks' names are often read in on'yomi. This doesn't mean the reading "Kenpachi" is impossible, though.

I remember an Anime character with this given name (Kenpachi), whom I can't recall at the moment. I reckon it was in Bleach.
Yes, Zaraki Kenpachi is the name of the captain of the 11th Division. The kanji of his given name is 剣八, though.
 

milindindia

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I, a native Japanese speaker, don't agree with that. Even if rendaku occurs on は, it should be けんち "Kenbachi", as in 女王蜂 "jōō-bachi", 蜜蜂 "mitsubachi" or 雀蜂 "suzumebachi". I would read it Kenhō or Kenpō since the surname seems to be related to Buddhism, and monks' names are often read in on'yomi. This doesn't mean the reading "Kenpachi" is impossible, though.


Yes, Zaraki Kenpachi is the name of the captain of the 11th Division. The kanji of his given name is 剣八, though.


But then even though 転法輪 is normally read as 'Ten'bourin' but as a surname it remains 'Ten'pourin' or even just 'Tebori'.

I mean, I really like the name Kenpachi, does it really sound that wrong, with the given Kanji? Kenpachi definitely sounds very Japanese and maybe popular too.

Come to think of it, even 剣八 could have been Kenbachi, like we have 中八 (Nakabachi), 晝八 (Chuubachi).
 

Toritoribe

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as a surname it remains 'Ten'pourin'
That's from the difference between kun'yomi はち and on'yomi ほう (both 法 and 蜂). You can see that I wrote "Kenpō" for the reading of 兼蜂 in my previous post, right?

does it really sound that wrong, with the given Kanji?
I already answered it.
This doesn't mean the reading "Kenpachi" is impossible, though.
I just pointed out that your friend's opinion "people are more likely to read your name as 'Kenpachi' at first glance" is not correct.

Kenpachi definitely sounds very Japanese and maybe popular too.
Your impression is just because you know Bleach. Kenpachi actually sounds rather oldish, and is rare nowadays.

Come to think of it, even 剣八 could have been Kenbachi
"Hachi" is on'yomi.

Again, I'm not saying the reading "Kenpachi" is wrong. It's not so common, but acceptable. In fact, you can give any reading to a kanji name in Japanese law. I often use this example, but there really exists a boy's name 拳, reading なっくる "Nakkuru", which is from an English word "knuckle".
 

milindindia

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Which one is the best and more accurate reading for Kanji in the name 兼蜂 : 'かねはち' (Kanehachi) or 'けんぱち' (Kenpachi) or 'けんばち' (Kenbachi) or 'けんほう' (Kenhou) or 'けんぽう' (Kenpou)? And which one sounds better as the name of a 20 year old? The family name being, 転法輪(てぼり)― Tebori.
 

milindindia

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Didn't @Toritoribe already answer your question on this? Simply posting it on another section of this forum isn't likely to get you another answer. @Toritoribe is a native speaker and in my opinion has informed and informative answers on the Japanese language.
Well, you see. This is a different question. It is about which sounds the best, which is a bit more subjective in a sense. Each one of them is possible but I need help choosing one.
I didn't mean to offend anyone, or demean their opinion.
 

milindindia

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I merged the threads. That's the answer.

But you didn't give your preferred choice among these.

Which one is the best and more accurate reading for Kanji in the name 兼蜂 : 'かねはち' (Kanehachi) or 'けんぱち' (Kenpachi) or 'けんばち' (Kenbachi) or 'けんほう' (Kenhou) or 'けんぽう' (Kenpou)? And which one sounds better as the name of a 20 year old? The family name being, 転法輪(てぼり)― Tebori.
 

Toritoribe

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You can choose the one you like, as I wrote "you can give any reading to a kanji name". The level of "how oldish it cold sound" is similar among them anyway.
 
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