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挫 reading as hishigi

tfm

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Hello,

I recently saw this article:


And it caught my eyes the kanji 挫 read as hishigi. When I checked it here:


and here


I can't find this particular reading. It seem that the kujiki ( き ) reading would make sense, though.

I understand it may be a tokubestu no kotoba, very specific, in this case, to Judo. But even in this case shouldn't this reading be listed in a dictionary?

Could anyone explain in greater detail the historical usage of this reading in Budo (as in Judo), or ancient Bugei (as in ancient Jujutsu)?

Thank you.
 

Toritoribe

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Indeed, the kanji 拉 is usually used for ひしぐ. However, there are other similar examples in Judo, for instance 腕緘 udegarami. からむ is usually 絡む, and 緘 is for とじる(緘じる), so these would be special usage in Judo.
 
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tfm

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Indeed, the kanji 拉 is usually used for ひしぐ. However, there are other similar examples in Judo, for instance 腕緘 udegarami. からむ is usually 絡む, and 緘 is for とじる(緘じる), so these would be special usage in Judo.
Thank you very much for your reply. I understood it.

I am particularly interested in this case of 挫 as hishigi. Does anyone know if it was meant to be a pun, originally, if some other art or field of knowledge uses this reading, or if there is any other information about it?
 

joadbres

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In the past more so than today, multiple different kanji could be used in the writing of words of Japanese origin. An effort was made to clean this up and standardize, but remnants of older kanji usages can still be found here and there in words surviving to this day. Most dictionaries reflect the more recent standardizations only. You might be able to find a dictionary that shows the word ひしぐ as able to be written with 挫 , or, conversely, the kanji 挫 having the reading of ひしぐ, but this would only be a very detailed and comprehensive dictionary which includes outdated usages.

Because the meaning of ひしぐ aligns closely with the meaning of 挫, it is not surprising that 挫 was used in some places in the past in the writing of the word ひしぐ. It is very unlikely that the character was chosen as a pun.
 

tfm

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In the past more so than today, multiple different kanji could be used in the writing of words of Japanese origin. An effort was made to clean this up and standardize, but remnants of older kanji usages can still be found here and there in words surviving to this day. Most dictionaries reflect the more recent standardizations only. You might be able to find a dictionary that shows the word ひしぐ as able to be written with 挫 , or, conversely, the kanji 挫 having the reading of ひしぐ, but this would only be a very detailed and comprehensive dictionary which includes outdated usages.

Because the meaning of ひしぐ aligns closely with the meaning of 挫, it is not surprising that 挫 was used in some places in the past in the writing of the word ひしぐ. It is very unlikely that the character was chosen as a pun.
I see, thank you very much for your time and explanation.
 
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