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千円からお預かりいたします。

healer

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What does から here really mean?
Why is it から not を?
 
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This is a typical case of バイト敬語 i.e. speech patterns that appear to be polite but are essentially grammatically incorrect. Here are some examples

Incorrect "baito keigo": よろしかったでしょうか? Correct keigo: よろしいでしょうか?
Incorrect: お名前のほう伺えますか? Correct: お名前を伺えますか?
Incorrec: 千円からお預かりいたします。 Correct: 千円をお預かりします
Incorrect: 5千円になります Correct: 5千円でございます
incorrect: こちらが領収書になります。 Correct: こちらが領収書でございます。

Overusing such expressions may leave an impression of undereducated person.
 

jt_

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For what it's worth, expressions like ~からお預かりします (instead of ~をお預かりします) and ~でよろしかったでしょうか (instead of ~でよろしいでしょうか) are often cited as examples of prescriptively ungrammatical/mistaken Japanese expressions that have become commonplace especially among younger workers in the service industry.

With your particular example, yes, it technically should be を because 千円 is the direct object of 預かる, i.e. you're taking the money. から, technically speaking, if anything, would mark the person the speaker is taking the money from.

I've never seen a definitive analysis of where the mistaken ~から expression originated from, but I suspect people use it with the sense that they're "starting" from a certain amount of money received, from which the transaction will be made.

Still, it's technically wrong and you'd be more correct to use the ~を version, so give yourself a pat on the back for your intuition being on the mark.
 

healer

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I suspect they were all started by people less educated. It could happen with all languages.

Some of these are made up with “double honorific” conjugations or 二重敬語 which are considered as grammatically incorrect in the textbooks I use. I have not come across one that has not mentioned this point when they come to these sort of examples for the topic. Well language when used often enough incorrect ones would become correct ones as long as they are acceptable to the natives. I wonder why no authority set out to correct them. It would just make it harder for foreigners learning the language. They would just be additional exceptions we have to learn and get used to.
 

jt_

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It's the same in any language, really. I mean, plenty of prescriptive grammarians would say that using "Can I~?" to ask for permission when you actually mean "May I~?" is "incorrect", but it's also in common use by plenty of native speakers (including educated ones) every day. What is considered an "acceptable" exception and an evolution of the language and what is considered a "mistake" is always a grey area, and there's no reason to expect Japanese to be more precise about what is or isn't strictly acceptable than any other language.

For me (and many people who don't make a living as prescriptive linguists, I'd imagine), this is simply a rather fascinating part of the idea of language as a living entity, and it's something that can be observed and appreciated without necessarily "interfering" with my own ability to pick up the language. After all, there's no real "authority" or entity monitoring any language in the world that would be primarily concerned about how easy it is or isn't for second language learners to acquire their language. If that were the case, English (for one example) would have overhauled their spelling system years ago, but I doubt that will ever realistically happen.
 

Majestic

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In modern US usage, I am annoyed by people using "should of" or "could of" instead of "should have" or "could have", or other variations on this. And I'm also annoyed by the habit of starting sentences with the word "So". What US authority exists to step in and correct these weird usages?

Fighting these things is a lost cause. People are going to use the language in the way that sounds appropriate to them, rather than the way grammarians insist it should be used. In a generation, people will find "would have" to be a quaint and classical way of writing "would of". Dictionaries will be describing the word "So" as an appropriate particle used to begin sentences. It will be the same in Japanese.
 

healer

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using "should of" or "could of"
Thanks for the examples.
Yes I do hear people actually say "should of" or "could of" instead of "should have" or "could have",
I believe the former would be marked wrong in any schools.
 

Majestic

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I hear it and see it written as "should of" all the time. Schools, I imagine, teach kids the correct way to say and spell "should have", but the gravity pull of spelling things the way they sound is very great.

So it goes with Japanese. I don't think there is a school in the country who teaches Japanese kids to say things like "千円からお預かり・・・”, but those same kids join the service-oriented workforce and it just feels like the right thing to say (plus, their colleagues may also be saying this). And customers accept it in the spirit in which the phrase is intended, so it goes unchallenged until people no longer feel it is incorrect.
 

OoTmaster

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In modern US usage, I am annoyed by people using "should of" or "could of" instead of "should have" or "could have", or other variations on this. And I'm also annoyed by the habit of starting sentences with the word "So". What US authority exists to step in and correct these weird usages?
Knowing the great country I live in. I can guarantee if any such US authority stepped in to correct things such as this they would only end up making it worse. In my humble opinion don't let the government mess up something worse than we're already doing ourselves. Makes it more genuine at least.
 

Majestic

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Yes - I agree, and that was, in a way, a point that I was hoping the original poster would pick up on.
The original poster asks, "I wonder why no authority set out to correct them?"

As we can see from the very many internet articles regarding how lamentable the use of よろしかった and ~からお預かり there are a lot of "internet authorities" trying to rectify the funny/incorrect usage of Japanese. And I'm sure these kids get taught correct usage in school (just like Americans are taught "would have" and "could have"), but some lessons don't stick, and the siren call of "spelling it like it sounds" is too hard to overcome for some people. In these Japanese cases, it isn't spelling it like it sounds, but rather, saying it in a way that sounds polite.

Anyway, I'm belaboring the point now. I think/hope the OP gets what I'm trying to say.
 
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healer

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it just feels like the right thing
I agree. The majority often wins.

I'm a stickler and often try to be meticulous in everything, even in using my own language, writing and speaking. I look up dictionaries for pronunciation and check the grammar as well. I prefer to know but not to use it if it is inappropriate. Of course sometimes we have no choice otherwise we would be regarded as a weirdo. One tries not to use the bad language but one has to learn it in the first place, otherwise one cannot identify it and can't understand what others try to get across.

the OP gets what I'm trying to say
Thanks I do.
 
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