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今週の金曜日は休業させて頂きますのでご注意ください。

healer

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The above is translated as "As we will be closing this Friday, please take note."

I suppose ~て頂きます is the humble form of てもらいます. What does it do grammatically here? It's not like the usual ones I used to see as having someone do something for us or for me.

Is it like having people pay attention to the notice?
 

Majestic

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The company is enjoying the generosity of you/us/we allowing them to take the day off.
 

bentenmusume

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healer said:
By the way, I have 今週の金曜日は休業させて頂きますのでご注意ください here translated as "As we will be closing this Friday, please take note."
I suppose ~て頂きます is the humble form of てもらいます. What does ~て頂きます do here? It's not like the usual ones I used to see as having someone do something for us or for me.

As you point out, ~て頂きます has the same meaning as ~てもらいます, with the only difference being that it's the humble form.

What is throwing you here is that this is an example of causative + てもらう.

With the causative form of する 「休業させて頂きます」 means, literally, "We will humble receive the favor of being let/allowed to close", or in more natural English "We'll take the liberty of...". The nuance is that the owner of the store is (humbly) doing something despite the inconvenience to his customers.

Note that if it were 休業して頂きます, it would "We will humbly receive the favor of _you_ closing", which obviously you're not going to hear much. Though you'll see similar forms like スタッフの指示に従っていただけないご利用者様にはお帰りいただく場合がございます)
 
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Buntaro

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Healer,

The phrases “sasete morau” and “sasete itadaku” are polite ways of asking to be allowed to do something. In your example, the business is kindly asking the customers to “allow” the business to close on Friday.

One way of me telling you I will do something is to just tell you I will do it. A more polite way is to ask you to allow me to do the same thing. But this is all politeness only, as I am really planning to what I will do, whether you allow me to do it or not. The Japanese language is very much a language that uses previously-established protocol phrases in specific situations, and this is an example of one of these situations. A big part of learning Japanese is learning all of the 'protocol phrases' that are used in specific situations. (Two such phrases that you may have already learned are "gochisou sama" and "gokurou sama" which are difficult to translate into English.)

So I would translate your example as, “Please be aware that we are asking your indulgence (asking you to allow us) to be closed on Friday," which sounds much polite than just saying "we will be closed on Friday."
 
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healer

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スタッフの指示に従っていただけないご利用者様にはお帰りいただく場合がございます
Is 従って in 従っていただけない the て-form したがる for the meaning of "to wish (to do); to desire; to want; to be ready; to be eager"?
Does スタッフの指示に従っていただけない qualifies ご利用者様?
Does 場合がございます mean "it is the case."
Does the whole sentence mean "Those users who aren't ready for the staff's instructions please return."?
 

bentenmusume

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Is 従って in 従っていただけない the て-form したがる for the meaning of "to wish (to do); to desire; to want; to be ready; to be eager"?
No, it's the verb 従う, meaning "obey" or "follow":

したがる (which is technically the -がる form of したい and not a unique verb in itself) is never written with that kanji (or any kanji, really).

Does スタッフの指示に従っていただけない qualifies ご利用者様?
Yes.

Does 場合がございます mean "it is the case."
That would be 場合でございます (or 場合です).

This is 場合ございます (i.e. 場合があります), so it means "There are cases" (or "There may be times...")

Does the whole sentence mean "Those users who aren't ready for the staff's instructions please return."?
No. Care to take another stab at it after my explanations above?
 

healer

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Thanks a lot! You're a gentleman and a scholar.
Care to take another stab
There are cases that we go back to the users who do not follow the staff's instructions.

I take a stab at doing it but I'm not confident.
 

Toritoribe

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There are cases that we go back to the users who do not follow the staff's instructions.

I take a stab at doing it but I'm not confident.
You misinterpreted the agent of 帰る. The subject of お帰りいただく, i.e. "we" is the recipient of favor, not the agent of the action.

By the way, I already explained about the agent in the expression "お + masu stem of verbs + いただく". (には is the topicalization of に.)

The agent is indicated by に in this expression (e.g. お客様お試しいただく).
 

healer

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Thanks for further explaining to me.

I struggle trying to understand.

I guess if お客様お試しいただく means "customers try", then
スタッフの指示に従っていただけないご利用者様にはお帰りいただく場合がございます could mean
"The users who do not follow the staff's instructions go back."
 

bentenmusume

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First, here's a general bit of advice. When trying to interpret a Japanese sentence, begin with the assumption that the sentence actually has some logical meaning.

Does "The users who do not follow the staff's instructions go back" make sense to you? If you saw that on a sign, would that mean anything to you? It doesn't make sense to me, which generally is a good sign that you've got something wrong. Japanese grammar and sentence structure are very different from English, but the actual content of what people actually talk about isn't wildly different or alien. So if your interpretation of a sentence feels like unclear, vague gobbledygook, try thinking about it in a different way. I can tell you that this sentence is expressing a very common and logical concept.

Returning to this example, here are a few things you're missing here:
- the nuance of 従っていただけない and お帰りいただく (unless you're intentionally excluding this)
- the nuance of 場合がございます (which I explained above)
- the specific meaning of 帰る in this context (in the context of a restaurant or facility, this would mean to leave, i.e. go home)

If you still feel confused, let me know and I'll give you the "answer" in hopes that it helps you puzzle things out.
 

healer

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Yes I did feel the translation wasn't good but that was the best I could do at the time.
I did realize 帰る can mean return or go home. Perhaps the latter fits better in the sentence.
I did forget 場合がございます.
I did not purposely exclude 従っていただけない and お帰りいただく and I thought I had already taken care of them.
Failing again this time, perhaps I should ask for the model answer.
"There are cases that the users who cannot follow the staff's instruction have to go home."
 

Toritoribe

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お帰りいただく is said by the shop/restaurant, so it's a kind of caution. You can think お帰りいただく "we receive a favor of those kinds of users' going home" is a very humble way of saying "we ask those users not to enter" or "we refuse them to enter".
 

bentenmusume

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Well, you're getting closer at least, so I commend your effort.

スタッフの指示に従っていただけないご利用者様にはお帰りいただく場合がございます

Ridiculously overly literal translation to explicitly spell out every grammar detail:
- There are cases where we will receive the favor of going home from those customers from whom we are unable to receive the favor of following the staff's instructions.

Slightly less forced and more natural translation:
- There are cases where we will have customers who do not follow the staff's instructions go home.

Natural English rendition:
- Uncooperative customers may be asked to leave.
 

healer

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it's a kind of caution
Japanese language is so polite, it’s hard to imagine it is a caution.

お帰りいただく though a humble form is the same as 帰ってもらう in meaning, isn’t it? So it is a caution even though the speaker is receiving the favour of a third party going home. Does it have a definite nuance of someone being asked to go home or being suggested only hoping one would leave voluntarily?

Ridiculously overly literal translation
Such a literal translation in a way helps me understand the sentence better in terms of the grammar. Thanks for your kindness. Coupled with the natural translation it would help me a lot.
 

Majestic

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Politeness shouldn't be mistaken for weakness. Or, in this case, just because it is polite, doesn't make it any less of a caution. The politeness shows all customers that the establishment has a certain level of standards. Conversely, if the most rude, rough language was used, all customers would feel somehow insulted, or, in the least, threatened.
 

healer

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Politeness shouldn't be mistaken for weakness.
Thanks for reminding me. You’re right. Receiving a favour if I understand correctly shouldn’t negate the action of the caution. Perhaps that’s the way how Japanese people do it or word a caution.
 

Toritoribe

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お帰りいただく though a humble form is the same as 帰ってもらう in meaning, isn’t it? So it is a caution even though the speaker is receiving the favour of a third party going home. Does it have a definite nuance of someone being asked to go home or being suggested only hoping one would leave voluntarily?
It differs totally depending on the context, of course. It can be used when the speaker is pleased with the addressee's getting/coming home, for instance.

Also, remember bentenmusume-san's (former jt_-san) explanation about ~てくれる/あげる/もらう. These expressions can be used just to show the direction of the action.
 
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