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はどう / やって / しちゃ / みないの / なんだから ... する

eeky

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Hiya,

1. In a story, someone has just remarked how American churches are different from Japanese shrines. Then the other person says:

そうなの。本当に違うのね。神様を呼ぶのに鈴を鳴らす のはどう。

My attempted translation: "Right, they're really different. What about sounding a bell to summon God?"

I don't really understand the role of はどう, which I'm assuming is は + どう. I translated as "What about...?" but it results in a slightly odd -- or at least ambiguous -- English sentence. What would be a better way of translating this?


2. 年始まわりの客が何人かやってきた。

My translation: "Some visitors came calling with New Year greetings."

What is the meaning of やって here?


3. まゆみ、だめよ。そんなにらんぼうにしちゃ。

My translation: "Mayumi, no! Don't be so rough!"

Is しちゃ = して + は?

If so, is the meaning like そんなにらんぼうにしてはだめよ?


4. Sometimes I get confused about whether or not seemingly negative statements are questions.

まゆみちゃん、しょってみないの。

From the context it seems like this should mean something like "Mayumi, why don't you try putting it on?" (talking about a ランドセル). Is this reasonable? Is it another sentence that would be said with a rising intonation?


5. A father is talking to his young daughter:

まゆみ、お父さんは一緒に入学式に行けないけど、もう 今日から一年生なんだからちゃんとするんだぞ、いいな 。

I get: "Mayumi, your father can't go with you to the school entrance ceremony, but already from today..."

Then I'm a bit lost. I'm guessing 一年生 ... ちゃんと ...んだぞ、いいな roughly means "(you're) just like a first-year student ... great!" However, I don't know how なんだから and する fit in.

Also, in the dictionary I'm using 一年生 is said to refer to college or high school students, whereas in the story まゆみ is very small and just starting primary school. Could 一年生 refer to the first year of primary school too?
 

Toritoribe

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1. In a story, someone has just remarked how American churches are different from Japanese shrines. Then the other person says:
そうなの。本当に違うのね。神様を呼ぶのに鈴を鳴らす のはどう。
My attempted translation: "Right, they're really different. What about sounding a bell to summon God?"
I don't really understand the role of はどう, which I'm assuming is は + どう. I translated as "What about...?" but it results in a slightly odd -- or at least ambiguous -- English sentence. What would be a better way of translating this?
~はどう? is a form asking about the addressee's opinion/view regarding the topic; "What do you think about~?"

2. 年始まわりの客が何人かやってきた。
My translation: "Some visitors came calling with New Year greetings."
What is the meaning of やって here?
やってくる is a verb meaning "to come".

http://dictionary.goo.ne.jp/leaf/jn2/222177/m0u/やってくる/

3. まゆみ、だめよ。そんなにらんぼうにしちゃ。
My translation: "Mayumi, no! Don't be so rough!"
Is しちゃ = して + は?
If so, is the meaning like そんなにらんぼうにしてはだめよ?
Exactly.

4. Sometimes I get confused about whether or not seemingly negative statements are questions.
まゆみちゃん、しょってみないの。
From the context it seems like this should mean something like "Mayumi, why don't you try putting it on?" (talking about a ランドセル). Is this reasonable? Is it another sentence that would be said with a rising intonation?
Yes. If it's said with a falling intonation, it means forbiddance or scolding (by female). しょわないの would be more common for the situation, though.

5. A father is talking to his young daughter:
まゆみ、お父さんは一緒に入学式に行けないけど、もう 今日から一年生なんだからちゃんとするんだぞ、いいな 。
I get: "Mayumi, your father can't go with you to the school entrance ceremony, but already from today..."
Then I'm a bit lost. I'm guessing 一年生 ... ちゃんと ...んだぞ、いいな roughly means "(you're) just like a first-year student ... great!" However, I don't know how なんだから and する fit in.
ちゃんとする means "to behave appropriately", and ~んだぞ is a form meaning "you must do".

as you are already a first-year student from today, you must behave appropriately for that, OK?

Also, in the dictionary I'm using 一年生 is said to refer to college or high school students, whereas in the story まゆみ is very small and just starting primary school. Could 一年生 refer to the first year of primary school too?
Right. 一年生 refers to the first year of all those schools including junior high school or kindergarten/nursery. What's more, it sometimes can be used also for working people, just like 社会人一年生.
 

eeky

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Thank you!
やってくる is a verb meaning "to come".
Sorry, I see now that this is also in the WWWJDIC dictionary that I mostly use. With compound verbs, I sometimes look up the components separately but forget to look up the whole.
 

Glenn

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Yeah, it took me a while to get that figured out too.
 

Toritoribe

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Actually, やってくる is originally from やる+くる, so your way of parsing is not incorrect. ;)
 

Glenn

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Heh, I'm pretty surprised at this one:

12 (他の動詞の連用形に付いて)
①(多く打消しの語を伴って用いる)動作が完了する意を表す。十分、または最後まで…する。「興奮がさめ―・らない」

Is 醒める the only verb it's used with like this?
 

Toritoribe

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What I can think of is only 残寒去りやらぬ候(compliments of the season) and 夜も明けやらぬうちに. Google search says there also are other examples 消えやらない, 晴れやらぬ, 宣はせやらず or like that, so this would be a bit classical usage, as we can see in ぬ/ず.
 
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