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うすく切れめを入れたような目 - translation

Cala

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The full sentence, which is a descrition of an old lady is:

うすく切れめを入れたような目と、ぐっとひろがった鼻。

切れめ is throwing me off here. Dictionary tells me it should be break/cut/rift/end/section/incision but none of those work for me. In the book it's just written like that but I guess it's 切れ目, which is what I'm finding in the dictionary.

It seemed as if her eyes contained a faint ____, and her nose was very wide.

Is it something like cutting eyes as in sharp gaze etc...?
 

Toritoribe

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"Slit" makes more sense, maybe? The slits are on her face, not eyes (i.e., it actually means 顔にうすく切れめを入れたような目).
 

Mike Cash

骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう
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What's throwing you is making the 入れた into "contained". It would have to be 切れめが(orの)入っている to arrive there.

うすく切れめを入れたような目

切り目を入れる means "to cut a slit" (in this case). Where there had not previously been a cut... someone inserted (added/created) one.

"Eyes like someone had cut a thin slit..."

"Thinly slit eyes..."

Etc.

Also notice the word describing nose is ひろがった, not 広い or 広かった.
 

Cala

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Thank you both, that clears things up quite a lot.

Is there a difference between 切り目 and 切れ目? You used both in your post. I tried looking it up, but I couldn't understand what I was reading.

As for the nose, does that make it more of a spread out nose?

All together I've got:

Her eyes were like thin slits, and her nose was spread out.
 

Toritoribe

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Is there a difference between 切り目 and 切れ目?
The original verbs are different between 切れ目 and 切り目. The former is from the intransitive verb 切れる, and the latter is from the transitive 切る, so 切り目 has a nuance of volitional and 切れ目 is more spontaneous. Unlike 切り目, 切れ目 can mean "an end" (e.g. a proverb 金の切れ目が縁の切れ目), and this is from "non-volitional" nuance of the intransitive 切れる.
As for the difference in the idiom 切れ目を入れる and 切り目を入れる, the meanings are almost the same. The former is more commonly used, though.
 

Majestic

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And maybe the original author didn't like the repetition of the kanji 目 in that sentence, so he/she opted for
切れめ rather than 切れ目.
 
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