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aizu

  1. Aizuwakamatsu Travel Guide

    Travel Aizuwakamatsu Travel Guide

    Aizuwakamatsu is a city in western Fukushima Prefecture, northern Honshū, and the most important city in the Aizu basin, with a population of about 125,000 residents. Established as a castle town of the Aizu Domain (会津藩 Aizu-han) in 1592, much of the city burned in the Boshin Civil War...
  2. Aizu Sake Museum

    Travel Aizu Sake Museum

    The history of sake-brewing in Aizu goes back to the sixteenth century when Gamō Ujisato (蒲生氏郷, 1556-1595) came into Aizu by order of Toyotomi Hideyoshi (豊臣秀吉) and invited sake brewers into the domain. Since the climate as well as the primary local ingredients, water and rice, are perfectly...
  3. Oyakuen

    Travel Oyakuen

    Oyakuen (御薬園) is also known as “Aizuwakamatsu’s Royal Garden“. The second Chinese character 薬 (kusuri or yaku) means “medicine” and refers to the fact that medicinal plants and herbs were grown there. The garden was originally built from 1429 to 1441 as a villa for Ashina Morihisa, the tenth...
  4. Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Travel Aizu Bukeyashiki

    The Aizu Buke-yashiki (会津武家屋敷) are the reconstructed samurai mansions of the chief retainers of the Aizu-Matsudaira, the Saigō family. The Saigō had served the Matsudaira since the middle of the seventeenth century. The reconstructed manor is based on plans dating back to end of the eighteenth...
  5. Tsuruga Castle

    Tsuruga Castle

    Aizu-Wakamatsu Castle (会津若松城), also known as Tsuruga Castle (鶴ヶ城 Tsuru-ga-jo) is a concrete replica of a traditional Japanese castle in northern Japan, at the center of the city of Aizuwakamatsu, in western Fukushima Prefecture.
  6. Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Aizu Bukeyashiki (会津武家屋敷) samurai residences: the former residence of the Matsudaira clan and their retainers in Aizuwakamatsu. Here, a Shinto shrine within the matsudaira compound.
  7. Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Aizu Bukeyashiki (会津武家屋敷) samurai residences: the former residence of the Matsudaira clan and their retainers in Aizuwakamatsu. Displayed here is a statue of Ganjin, a Chinese monk, who helped spread Buddhism in Japan in the eighth century. The statue commemorated Chinese-Japanese normalisation.
  8. Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Aizu Bukeyashiki (会津武家屋敷) samurai residences: the former residence of the Matsudaira clan and their retainers in Aizuwakamatsu.
  9. Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Aizu Bukeyashiki (会津武家屋敷) samurai residences: the former residence of the Matsudaira clan and their retainers in Aizuwakamatsu. Shown here, the tea rooms of the mansion called chashitsu and its nijiriguchi, or 'crawling-in entrance'.
  10. Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Aizu Bukeyashiki (会津武家屋敷) samurai residences: the former residence of the Saigo, the chief retainers of the Matsudaira in Aizuwakamatsu. Shown here, the tea rooms of the mansion called chashitsu.
  11. Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Aizu Bukeyashiki (会津武家屋敷) samurai residences: the former residence of the Saigo, the chief retainers of the Matsudaira in Aizuwakamatsu. Shown here are kago, shoulder-carried carriages.
  12. Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Aizu Bukeyashiki 会津武家屋敷) samurai residences: the former residence of the Saigo, the chief retainers of the Matsudaira in Aizuwakamatsu. Shown here is a water-powered rice-cleaning mill (hanmai-seimaijyo) that could clean 1,200 kg of rice per day.
  13. Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Aizu Bukeyashiki (会津武家屋敷) samurai residences: the former residence of the Saigo, the chief retainers of the Matsudaira in Aizuwakamatsu. The dressing room for one of the higher-ranking attendants.
  14. Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Aizu Bukeyashiki 会津武家屋敷) samurai residences: the former residence of the Saigo, the chief retainers of hte Matsudaira in Aizuwakamatsu. The bath of the mansion.
  15. Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Aizu Bukeyashiki (会津武家屋敷) samurai residences: the former residence of the Saigo, the chief retainers of hte Matsudaira in Aizuwakamatsu. Here, the lord's sleeping quarters, with his wife scolding the children for playing in what's off-limits to them.
  16. Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Aizu Bukeyashiki (会津武家屋敷) samurai residences: the former residence of the Saigo, the chief retainers of the Matsudaira in Aizuwakamatsu.
  17. Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Aizu Bukeyashiki (会津武家屋敷) samurai residences: the former residence of the Saigo, the chief retainers of the Matsudaira in Aizuwakamatsu. Here, the toilets of the mansion, using sand for sanitary purposes.
  18. Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Aizu Bukeyashiki (会津武家屋敷) samurai residences: the former residence of the Saigo clan, the chief retainers of the Matsudaira in Aizuwakamatsu. The head of the clan receiving a high-ranking guest.
  19. Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Aizu Bukeyashiki (会津武家屋敷) samurai residences: the former residence of the Saigo, the chief retainers of the Matsudaira in Aizuwakamatsu. Here, the clan chief receiving a high-ranking visitor.
  20. Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Aizu Bukeyashiki

    Aizu Bukeyashiki (会津武家屋敷) samurai residences: the former residence of the Matsudaira clan and their retainers in Aizuwakamatsu.
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