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Jlpt 5 Reading Test Practice

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So I was wondering if I'd be able to do some JLPT 5 reading comprehension after one month and a half just reading authentic material and Tae Kim's book. Let's see how well I fare.
JLPT 5 Reading Comprehension
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I found the first two questions pretty easy.
1. Japan's Ramen are delicious.
2. I have two siblings in my family, a brother and a sister.
Comments (1) & (2):
I couldn't remember whether 「弟」meant younger or older brother but I knew it was a brother so it didn't really cause too much problem when it came to understanding the sentence. Same thing for 「妹」so I looked it up after (younger brother and younger sister).
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Comments (3):
I found this one a bit harder.
Yamashita: "Did you go out somewhere yesterday?"
Tanaka: "No, I stayed home."

I'm pretty sure about the translation. I was hesitating between 「に」&「は」. For some reason 「に」seemed tempting because there was an adverbial there but wouldn't fit right there in that context. Since the sentence is about 田中さん I figured that was the right answer.
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Comments (4):
This one takes place in a taxi with person giving direction.
A: Next, turn on the right please.
B: Understood.
All of the other three answers didn't make sense so I opted for the one I was pretty certain of from the get-go. I think 「に」here refers to: after a noun, indicates the direction or the destination of an action.
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Comments (5)

Yesterday, I went to see a movie with two people.
I wasn't sure if えいが meant a movie or the cinema in this context. I looked it up and
えいが/映画 does mean movie while えいがかん/映画館 would mean the movie theater.
As for the particle, I chose 「で」because I thought it was the manner of doing something: indicates the manner of an action, or the condition/intention at the time of occurrence/action.
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Comments (6):
Yamashita: -Since there's a party today, would you like to come?
Tanaka: -Thank you.

I wasn't too sure about this one. On second thought, it's probably 「や」: Placed after a noun, loosely refers to it and other things that are also present or similar.
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Comments (7):
Tanaka: -Does this hat belong to you?
Yamada: -Yes, it does.

This one is easy enough. Nothing to comment really. Out of curiosity, I looked up the kanji form of ぼうし (hat): 帽子.
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Comments (8):
The taxi fare to the train station is about 1000 yen.
I picked the first one because he didn't recognize 2 & 3. I knew it wasn't 「も」. From memory, I recalled that 「ぐらい」was an expression for approximation.
So after picking my answer, I looked up 「など」and 「ごろ」.
So it turns out 「など」is a marker that indicates exemplification. So it doesn't really apply here.
「ごろ」also refers to an approximation. So the purpose of this sentence is likely to differentiate the various expressions for approximation. Reading further about 「ごろ」revealed that it was used with time, so this one is out too.
Reading further about 「ぐらい/くらい」are approximation for quantity. So that settled the whole thing, turned out I had picked the right answer.
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Comments (9):
A-Goodbye.
B-Goodbye. See you next week.

I'm not sure about this one.
「おととい」means the day before yesterday so that wasn't the right answer.
「今日」means today. Unlikely answer. Unless they're supposed to meet again on the same day but I don't think so.
「来週」means next week so that would work. I knew this one.
「今月」means this month. This one would work too I think. I also knew this one.
I would've imagined 「また」would guide me in the right direction. From memory, I thought it meant "again".
I guess both "3" and "4" would work but "3" is more colloquial.
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Comments (10):
-My mom is 50 years old. My father is 55 years old. My father is 5 years older than my mom.
I vaguely remembered reading that 「より」was used for comparison. After picking my answer, I read up a bit on 「より」to check if I misremembered or not.
So yes, I remembered correctly: a particle which indicates that something or someone is being compared to something or someone.
Unfortunately, I couldn't find the answer key but I'll keep looking.
Thanks for reading and let me know if you think I've made a mistake. At the moment I think I probably would've gotten 9 or 10 out of 10.

Comments

Even if it's not a textbook, I'm happy to see you working with materials targeted more closely at your current level.

Ziska said:
Comments (3):
For some reason 「に」seemed tempting because there was an adverbial there but wouldn't fit right there in that context.
Your answer is correct, but I'm curious what you mean by "because there's an adverbial there." If you're not marking 田中さん as the indirect object (or source for receiving verbs, though this is a trickier concept), it's not going to be に.

田中さんに本をあげました。
I gave a book to Tanaka-san.
田中さんに聞いてください。
Please ask Tanaka-san.
田中さんに教えてもらいました。
I had Tanaka-san teach me.

These are examples of cases where you'd use に. The difference should be pretty clear.

Ziska said:
Comments (4):
A: Next, turn on the right please.
Your answer is correct, but note that this is "Turn right at the next corner" with 次(つぎ) modifying 角(かど).

Ziska said:
Comments (5)
Yesterday, I went to see a movie with two people.
Your answer is correct, but your translation is not.
(ひとり does not mean "two people," and "with" is not the right interpretation for で)

Ziska said:
Comments (6):
Yamashita: -Since there's a party today, would you like to come?
Tanaka: -Thank you.
I wasn't too sure about this one. On second thought, it's probably 「や」: Placed after a noun, loosely refers to it and other things that are also present or similar.
Neither に or や is correct.
See above for cases when you would use に with 田中さん.

Not sure where that explanation for や is from, but it is oddly vague.
や works like と, except that it is for inexhaustive rather than exhaustive listings.

田中さんと山下さんが来ました。
Tanaka and Yamashita came. (i.e. and no one else did)
田中さんや山下さんが来ました。
Tanaka and Yamashita (among others) came.

や doesn't make sense before a ~てください request.
I'd look all these particles up in the DBJG and study the example sentences more closely.

Also, 来てください doesn't have the nuance of "Would you like to~"
 
Ziska said:
Comments (9):
「今日」means today. Unlikely answer. Unless they're supposed to meet again on the same day but I don't think so.
「今月」means this month. This one would work too I think. I also knew this one.
Much like in English, even if you were going to see someone again the same day (or month), you probably wouldn't say it this way.

Compare "See you again today!" vs. "See you again tonight!", "See you again this month!" vs. "See you again at the end of the month!" / "See you again next week!", etc.

Ziska said:
Comments (10):
-My mom is 50 years old. My father is 55 years old. My father is 5 years older than my mom.
Your answer is correct, but your translation of 母は 父より 5さい わかいです is incorrect.
Review the definition of わかい(若い) and note who the topic is and who is being compared to who.

---

If I were to give you one piece of advice based upon what I'm seeing here, it would be to try to wean yourself off of understanding particles through English explanations. Even when your answers are correct, at times it seems you are "puzzling" things through a vague understanding of what the particles do rather than a clear understanding of how the sentences are structured.

This means, unfortunately, that you could be tripped up by similar questions worded differently (which the JLPT likes to do). I would suggest going back and reviewing example sentences with the particles and make sure that you _really_ understand how the words are connected to each other. Good luck.
 
My advise is just only one. Post these answers in the forum, not in the blog, as all the members do so that you can get responses.
 

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