What's new

Days of the Week - That's Not How You Learn Japanese!

My first lesson in how NOT to learn Japanese. Let's begin!

Days of the Week

Monday
getsuyoubi
げつようび

Tuesday
kayoubi
かようび

Wednesday
suiyoubi
すいようび

Thursday
mokuyoubi
もくようび

Friday
kinyoubi
きにょうび

Saturday
doyoubi
どようび

Suncay
nichiyoubi
にちようび
_________________

Ah, Monday. No one in the western world likes you. You are a rainy day. Oh look, even in Japanese, you're a bit of an issue. Your second syllable is the first syllable of tsunami. So getsuyoubi is the start of the week, but it gets better.

See, you can move on to the next day, you can kayak to it and just float along. Tueday, kayoubi, float on down the week.

Wednesday seems to be spaghetti day for a lot of people. When you slurp spaghetti, you tend to make the same face as when you'd start to say suiyoubi.

Ah! Ah! I got nothing for Thursday! I just see Pac-Man in the middle of the word. Maybe I can just associate mokuyoubi with Pac-Man, which doesn't help me remember that it's Thursday. Hmmm... Thor's Day. Does Thor play Pac-Man?

Friday is the end of the week, which is a good time to get together with people. However, I don't often want to go out on a Friday night with my kin folk, I'd rather go out with friends. Whatever happens on kinyoubi, happens.

Saturday is a good day to do things, because you're usually not working. You can do the lawn, you can do a garage sale, you can do nothing. I know the pronunciation is "doh" and not "doo," but doyoubi is the day to do things you can't do during the week.

Finally we have Sunday. If you're American and Christian, you go to church. There seems to be a niche for Christianity in Japan, it's not as widespread as it is in the states but it exists. So in America, you go to church on nichiyoubi. Also, chi is a syllable, which makes me think of inner peace and enlightenment, so nichiyoubi is a spiritual day.

All of the days of the week end in -youbi. It throws me off to see the word for the weekend, shuumatsu (しゅうまつ). Of course, the word "weekend" doesn't have the word "day" in it, so that much makes sense. As I see it, the word ends with the syllable tsu, which is like a warning of the upcoming storm. Oh no, getsuyoubi is coming! The shuumatsu is to prepare for getsuyoubi.

While I could continue with "yesterday, today, tomorrow," I'm going to possibly save that for a future entry.

Thanks for reading!
  • Like
Reactions: thomas and JREF

Comments

There are no comments to display.

Journal entry information

Author
LunaDragon
Views
747
Last update

More entries in Language

Top