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Which words would be suitable in the blank?

hirashin

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Dear native English speakers,
Which would be suitable in the blank?
Q1 He is __________ take the examination next week.
a) going to b) supposed to

Q2 Eric's father asked me to __________ with Eric.
a) keep friends b) stay friends c) be a friend d) be friends e) remain friends

Q3 I hope my son __________ a lot of friends at his new school.
a) will make b) makes c) can make

Q4 I __________ a convenience store to copy his notebook.
a) dropped in b) dropped by c) dropped at d) dropped in at

Q5 Tom and Mike are very good friends. I think they will _________ the same.
a) keep b) stay c) be d) remain

Q6 According to the weather forcast, it _________ rain tomorrow.
a) will b) is going to

Hirashin
 
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Q1) Both should mean the same thing. It depends on the context. If there are sentences on that tell me. Though, since it is next week my guess is 'going to'
Q2) d
Q3) Literally all can be correct. However, my best bet would be c
Q4) b
Q5) d
Q6) a
 
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In what context are "going to" and "supposed to" the same? "Supposed to" merely means that he is expected to go, not that he actually will. See: "He's supposed to take the examination next week, but since I haven't seen him studying at all, I think he's forgotten about it (and thus will end up not going unless someone reminds him)".
 
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Q1. Both are suitable. Both express slightly different things. It is a question of intention vs. condition.
Q2. a) understandable, but not natural. Unsuitable.
b) Perfectly suitable.
c) Understandable, but not quite natural. I hate to say unsuitable, but it is slightly odd.
d) Perfectly suitable.
e) Suitable
Q3. All are suitable. (Again, a slight nuance of intention vs. potential, but all are natural, normal usages).
Q4. b) and d) are suitable. a) is understandable, but slightly odd. c) is not suitable.
Q5. b) and d) are suitable. a) is unsuitable. c) works grammatically, but it is slightly strange.
Q6. Both are suitable
 
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In what context are "going to" and "supposed to" the same? "Supposed to" merely means that he is expected to go, not that he actually will. See: "He's supposed to take the examination next week, but since I haven't seen him studying at all, I think he's forgotten about it (and thus will end up not going unless someone reminds him)".
"It turns out he needs to take the exam. He's supposed to take the examination next week"

He is required/ expected to.

"It turns out he needs to take the exam. He's going to take the examination next week"

Same first sentence. Means that he is going to take it or, roughly, 'he said he'll take it' type of attitude and tone..

"He has been studying for weeks, and he is going to take the exams next week"

^Shows that he is prepared. 'Because he studied, he is going to take the exams'

"He didn't study at all, and he is suppose to take the exams next week."

^Shows that he is not prepared, but is suppose to take exams. 'He is suppose to take the exams next week, but he didn't study."

Hope that helped. Your post kinda confused me, but English is my best subject so..
 
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They are both suitable of course, but they do not "mean the same thing" like you wrote in your first post :)
 
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