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What do Japanese people generally eat during lunchtime and diner?

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In the morning, Japanese people often eat „umeboshi“, which is a very sour and salty pickled plum, which should give you energy and vitality for the whole day. Furthermore, rice, a warm miso soup with tofu and seaweed and smoked or raw fish are eaten as well in the mornning. Beside that, pickled vegetables such as China cabbage, radish and cucumber are eaten too. The Japaneses eat eggs as well as we do, but in a raw or in a faltered way or as an omelette. (I'm from Germany.)
 
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Same in my family. Umeboshi for breakfast? Only when staying at a hotel or a ryokan. "Western" breakfast, read coffee and bread, is becoming more common nowadays, as it's easier to prepare.

A little overview over what's eaten in Japan here:

Cuisine - Japanese Food | Japan Forum
Oh okay, I didn't know that. I just read this on 2 websites and believed that it's right. And what do they eat during lunchtime and diner?
 

mdchachi

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Oh okay, I didn't know that. I just read this on 2 websites and believed that it's right. And what do they eat during lunchtime and diner?
Your "typical" breakfast is pretty accurate but for households that are on-the-go it's usually not a full meal like that. In my household frequently it's rice which is still warm in the rice cooker from the night before. And whatever tsukemono is at hand (the pickles, umeboshi or whatever). Usually no protein like fish since there isn't any left over. Miso soup on occasion when there's some left. Other days it's fresh bread & jam from the expensive Japanese bread maker I had to lug home on one of my business trips. In Japan there are great fresh bakery options from sweet items to savory items. One of my favorite things about Japan actually.

Regarding lunch/dinner, take a look at the link that Thomas put up. I think that covers it.
In short, every meal consists of noodles or not-noodles. Sometimes both.
 
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Regarding lunch/dinner, take a look at the link that Thomas put up. I think that covers it.
In short, every meal consists of noodles or not-noodles. Sometimes both.
Well that is pretty much all-encompassing: noodles or not-noodles. You might as well say potatoes or not potatoes, fish or not fish, etc. Sorry for being so sarcastic.

Lunch.
Are we talking about a salariman, a housewife (young or old), college students, younger students?
Safely assume rice is usually (not always) served in some way, even if only as an onigiri.
Dinner
Case by case. Would you say Germans always eat sausage and sauerkraut and potatoes in some form? Or that Americans always eat pizza or hamburgers? Nope.

That web site is only for restaurants. Most people don't eat lunch or dinner at restaurants. That site is just to show what traditional (not typical) foods there are.
 

Mike Cash

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Oh okay, I didn't know that. I just read this on 2 websites and believed that it's right. And what do they eat during lunchtime and diner?
Do a google image search on 日本 家庭料理 and you can see countless examples. This isn't a question with a brief and easy answer. There are millions of people in millions of families eating millions of meals in millions of homes spread over 22 degrees of latitude and 23 degrees of longitude. Preferences vary by region. This may come as a shock, but Japan isn't all the same and neither are the people or their dietary habits.
 

Lothor

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In my household frequently it's rice which is still warm in the rice cooker from the night before.
Not just leftover rice for breakfast but often leftover food from the previous evening that I wouldn't normally associate with breakfast, such as curry.
 

mdchachi

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Well that is pretty much all-encompassing: noodles or not-noodles. You might as well say potatoes or not potatoes, fish or not fish, etc. Sorry for being so sarcastic.
No need to apologize. You didn't get the joke that's all. It's always a risk when one doesn't add a smiley. But I like living on the edge like that.

This isn't a question with a brief and easy answer.
Ironically Mike missed my brief and easy answer. It covers all permutations.
 

Mike Cash

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No need to apologize. You didn't get the joke that's all. It's always a risk when one doesn't add a smiley. But I like living on the edge like that.


Ironically Mike missed my brief and easy answer. It covers all permutations.
That I didn't remark upon it is no sign I missed it.
 
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