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Various questions about the exam another teacher made

hirashin

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Dear native English speakers
I'm checking the English exam that another teacher made. I am supposed to do it.
I have some questions about his problems.

Q1
Would all these sentences with the passive voice sound natural?
(a) Some flowers were sent to he by Ben.
(b) This beautiful necklace was brought for me by my aunt.
(c) A special award was given to Julia.
(d) He was elected mayor of our city.
(e) This chocolate cake was made for us by Bill.
(f) A lovely card will be sent to me by Sally.
(g) We were given a lot of books by my mother.
(h) It is said that it will be warm this winter.

Q2
Would the following sentences be used?
(a1) They didn't let me alone.
(a2) They didn't leave me alone.
(a3) I wasn't allowed to be alone.
(a4) I wasn't let alone.
(a5) I wasn't let to be alone.
(a6) I wasn't left alone
(a7) I wasn't left to be alone.

Q3
Would the following sentences be used?
(b1) It is reported that he will retire soon.
(b2) It is reported that he is going to retire soon.
(b3) It is reported that he is retiring soon
(b4) It is reported that he will be retiring soon.
(b5) It is reported him to retire soon.
(b6) It is reported him to be retiring soon.

Q4
Would all the sentences have almost the same meaning?
(c1) It is difficult to realize your dream.
(c2) It is difficult to realize a dream
(c3) It is difficult to realize dreams.
(c4) It is difficult to realize your dreams.

Q5
What's the difference between (a) and (b)?
(a) I'm glad to meet you.
(b) I'm glad to see you.

Q6
Do you also say (c) and (d) meaning (a) or (b)?
(c) I'm happy to meet you.
(d) I'm happy to see you.

Q7
Would either sentence be used interchangeably?
(a) His eyes were full of tears.
(b) His eyes were filled with tears.

Q8
Which preposition would be used in the blank?
(a) Her father was shocked her final decision.
(b) The mountain is covered snow.
(c) He was surprised the news.
(d) He was excited the result of the game.
(e1) They were satisfied the result of the game.
(e2) They were happy the result of the game.
(e3) They were content the result of the game.

Thanks in advance.

Hirashin
 

Julie.chan

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I'll only respond to the wrong ones or the ones I have something to say about. Everything else is perfect to my knowledge
(b5) It is reported him to retire soon.
(b6) It is reported him to be retiring soon.
.

(a) Some flowers were sent to he by Ben.
Nope. That should be "him", not "he".

(b) This beautiful necklace was brought for me by my aunt.
I'm not sure. I would use "brought to me", not "brought for me", and the latter is easy to misread as "bought for me". But I don't know, it might just be an uncommon choice of words.

It is said that it will be warm this winter.
That's fine, but note that "it is said" is an expression that more often refers to legends rather than simple rumors.

(a1) They didn't let me alone.
(a4) I wasn't let alone.
Yes, but only in some dialects. I know it's normal in British English and incorrect in American English. I don't know about any other dialect.

(a5) I wasn't let to be alone.
Nope, not that one.

(b5) It is reported him to retire soon.
(b6) It is reported him to be retiring soon.
Nope. Not even close, I'm afraid.

Would all the sentences have almost the same meaning?
(c1) It is difficult to realize your dream.
(c2) It is difficult to realize a dream
(c3) It is difficult to realize dreams.
(c4) It is difficult to realize your dreams.
Yep. C2 is a little unusual, but fine.

What's the difference between (a) and (b)?
(a) I'm glad to meet you.
(b) I'm glad to see you.
"Meet" is typically only used for the first time you meet them, and something else is typically used after that. "See" is typically only used for people you have already met before and are meeting again. It's not a hard rule, though.

"I'm glad to see you" can also be an expression of relief, e.g. if the person you're talking to is going to get you out of some predicament. This is typically the only case where you would say "I'm glad to see you" to someone you are unacquainted with.

By the way, "Pleased to meet you" and "Nice to meet you" are both far more common than "I'm glad to meet you".

Do you also say (c) and (d) meaning (a) or (b)?
(c) I'm happy to meet you.
(d) I'm happy to see you.
C is the same as A and D is the same as B. My comments on those also apply here.

Would either sentence be used interchangeably?
(a) His eyes were full of tears.
(b) His eyes were filled with tears.
Yes.

Which preposition would be used in the blank?
If I've guessed where the blanks are supposed to be:

(a) Her father was shocked by her final decision.
(b) The mountain is covered in snow.
(c) He was surprised by the news.
(d) He was excited about/for the result of the game.
(e1) They were satisfied with the result of the game.
(e2) They were happy with/about the result of the game.
(e3) They were content with the result of the game.
 

johnnyG

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If I've guessed where the blanks are supposed to be:
I think I would add/change:

(a) Her father was shocked by/at her final decision.
(b) The mountain is covered in/with snow.
(c) He was surprised by/at the news.
(d) He was excited about/for?/by the result of the game.
(e1) They were satisfied with the result of the game.
(e2) They were happy with/about the result of the game.
(e3) They were content with the result of the game.

I don't have time for the rest right now..., but in (d) I've crossed out "for" tentatively.
 
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hirashin

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Thank you for the help, Julimaruchan and johnnyG.
(d) He was excited about/for?/by the result of the game.
Would "He was excited at the result of the game" sound off?
 

johnnyG

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Thank you for the help, Julimaruchan and johnnyG.

Would "He was excited at the result of the game" sound off?
No, I'd stick with about or by. I'm thinking of adding over to this one, since people often say things like Don't get so excited over that. ...or something similar.

After reading about excited a little, it seems people are now saying things like I'm excited for the concert.

For me, excited for needs to be followed by a person, so that you are excited on someone's behalf: You're getting married? Oh, I'm really excited for you!

IMO, you can't be excited on behalf of a concert, but apparently there's a section of middle america that talks like that.
 

Julie.chan

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Always in motion is language. ;)

I have zero problem whatsoever with saying I'm "excited for" an anticipated event. I use it myself.
 
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