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Today was nenkin sign up day for me

musicisgood

Sempai
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My Japanese Pension Service informed me today after I submitted all the paper work that my yearly amount would be. This is paid every other month. I'm on the KOKOMIN type of nenkin.
I will be deducted old age care called kaigo nen starting next April.
We had other members here post about nenkin but this is my actual story. I've paid into for some time. How many years, not sure. The last amount I was paying monthly of \14800 and when I first started it might have been around \10000 or there about per month.
The benefit of paying into the Japanese Pension Service is when you are 65 years of age you get some kind of care if you become disable. I don't know anything about it other then it is called kaigo nen. I think it will cost about \6000 per month starting next April. So my actual payment received will actually be less then what I've been paying into the pension plan.
Luckily I get US social security, which too is small since I haven't paid into it since 93.
But anyway, I just want to let you all know that for Kokomin payout, you actually won't know what you'll get until on your 65th birthday after submitting all the paper work.
So there you have it. Someone here said the amounts do vary, which in fact they do, my wife gets a few more yen then me.
Now I understand why I see 70, 80 year olders and beyond still working. They probably are in the same position as I.
For those of you collecting a Japanese pension, would you like to share your story here.
 

musicisgood

Sempai
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Also note that when you get your appointment, bring all your passports with you. You'll get a notice when to apply about 2 or 3 months before your 65th birthday.
If for some reason that you gave up your resident card over the years you've been in and out of Japan, this will show up on the Japanese Pension papers and you'll need your passports and also an explanation as to why.
Once the paper work is submitted it then go through another channel for approval, this takes 2 or 3 months. If approved, you'll get some kind of certificate from the city office, after that then one can expect to get their pension.
The appointment can last from one hour to maybe 2.5 hours. It is very time consuming, but the service people do most of all the talking.
 

musicisgood

Sempai
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Did a lot of it sound like something they had memorized?
I guess they go step by step with some kind of check list. The wife told me that her interview took over 2 hours long. Not sure why, maybe because she lived in America for quite some time.

Anyway, the real benefit is not the amount that I get for kokomin nenkin, its the old age health care service that people come to your home to assist one with their medical needs.
It is probably something like what the US has. My mother has that type of service. Don't know what it is called though.
 

musicisgood

Sempai
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I also like to mention that everyone who is 65 and older must pay the "Kaigo Hoken", this is the health insurance for the elderly. It's based upon ones income. Both you and your spouse pay into it separately. You have to pay it at the bank , but when there, do the paper work for it can be withdrawn automatically every month. The more your make in one year, the higher your premium is. According to the paper work I have, the current highest amount one will pay is "176,400 yen" a year. The smallest amount one will pay is "31,752 yen" a year. And this is all based upon your income.
 
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I also like to mention that everyone who is 65 and older must pay the "Kaigo Hoken", this is the health insurance for the elderly. It's based upon ones income. Both you and your spouse pay into it separately. You have to pay it at the bank , but when there, do the paper work for it can be withdrawn automatically every month. The more your make in one year, the higher your premium is. According to the paper work I have, the current highest amount one will pay is "176,400 yen" a year. The smallest amount one will pay is "31,752 yen" a year. And this is all based upon your income.
Really sorry!! But the Kaigo Hoken is actually payable from the age of 40.

See quick random link found with a simple search.
Mitaka City|Municipal Office Information|Long-term Care Insurance (Kaigo Hoken)

Its normally added/included with your insurance that is deducted each month from your income, however if you work things right, either husband/wife can include their spouse as a dependent and they are covered, so no need to pay separately.

At the age of 65 the payments would be deducted from any pension you receive.
 
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for Kokomin payout, you actually won't know what you'll get until on your 65th birthday after submitting all the paper work.
I went in and asked 2-3 years before I was 65 and they gave me a printout showing me what the payout would have been if I had been retired right then. In retrospect, it was really accurate.
 
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Now I understand why I see 70, 80 year olders and beyond still working. They probably are in the same position as I.
For those of you collecting a Japanese pension, would you like to share your story here.
The reason you see 70/80 year old Japanese still working, is because there is no set retirement age for those working in agriculture.

Also you do not need to collect your pension at 65, you can wait until you are older and collect a larger monthly amount.
 
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musicisgood

Sempai
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The reason you see 70/80 year old Japanese still working, is because there is no set retirement age for those working in agriculture.

Also you do not need to collect your pension at 65, you can wait until you are older and collect a larger monthly amount.
That part I didn't know of. But my pension is so very small, I wouldn't even think of waiting any longer to receive it.
I think what you also mentioned above is true with all of us that are self-employed here in Japan or end up with "contract jobs" with no benefits.
 
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