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This weeks interesting releases

Twisted

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Interesting releases for this week

Here are some cool releases coming out this week:
Singles:
Deen - Kanashimi no mukogawa
The Brilliant Green - Angel Song -Eve no kane-
Yuki Koyanagi - Koyanagi the Christmas
Zard - Promised You
Glay - Missing you
Surface - Boku ha Mitasareru
Gackt - Secret Garden
Sads - Nightmare
Cascade - Sexy, sexy
Jungle Smile - 16 Sai

Albums:
Sakura - Song for you

Video / DVD:
Sex Machineguns - SM Show
E.M.U. - E.M.U BEST DVD Thank You-
 

Twisted

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Again a list of new releases for the upcoming week that are worth parting your money with. This week sees a monster amount of releases in Japan so there's a lot of stuff I don't mention here. I'm just going to highlight a few releases that I think are interesting.
Let's start with the singles:
Fans of Speed will be pleased to receive a new single by Eriko (this time without Crunch) called "In the name of love".

The new Shiro single should be interesting. Who is Shiro? Shiro is a singer with Extasy Records which is run by Yoshiki (from X-Japan). He also produces her singles so expect plenty of drama like we remember it from the X-Japan ballads.

Anybody know who Lana Hanako McKissack is? Well, i don't know much about her, but apparently she starred in a few movies in the US. Her last single "I don't know why" really impressed me but I don't believe it made much of a dent in the charts. As far as i'm concerned she's in the same league as Hikaru Utada and Mai Kuraki so i suggest you check out her new single, which is titled "Sing a song".

Some more single releases of this week:
TRF - Burst drive mix - 5th mix -
Globe - Don't look back
Pizzicato 5 - Juunigatsu nijuuyokka
Judy and Mary - Motto
Hysteric Blue - Daisuki
Dreams come true - 24/7
La'Cryma Christy - Life

And of course the most interesting release of this week is the new single by Bird which will be released simultaneously with her new album. "Mindtravel" is the openingtrack of that album with the same title. Anything that's produced by Shinichi Osawa is good so all you Mondo Grosso fans outthere should buy this album.

On the subject of albums...
Oblivion Dust are produced by the some guy from the US called Ray McVeigh. The same guy that played alongside hide in Zilch. Oblivion Dust have all the potential to make it big internationally since singer Ken Lloyd is half British. You've probably already heard of guitarist Kaz who played in Spread Beaver. Anyway, their third album is titled "Butterfly Head".

The guys from Pierrot are looking more scary with every new release. Their second album "Private Enemy" will contain hits such as "Agitator" and "Shinkei ga wareru atsui yoru".

There was some delay, but it's finally here: "Miutation". A new album for Miu Sakamoto featuring guest appearances from Sugizo (Luna Sea), Kazafumi Miyazawa and it's produced by her father Ryuichi Sakamoto. It's her second album.

Also a second album for Bugy Craxone. A really impressive band which isn't getting enough attention. If you've never heard of them, then this would be a good opportunity to get to know them. This album is titled "Yuganda ao to hakenai kanjo no soko".

And that leaves the video section:
Malice Mizer have kind of alienated themselves from a lot of their fans with their last album, since it wasn't as poppy as their previous album. And that's a bit of an understatement. Well, Gackt took those fans with him when he went solo anyway. Malice Mizer have moved beyond cheap synthesizer orchestra's and spend a fortune on choirs and real orchestra's in order to deliver a spinechilling gothic and industrial sound and Gackt, well, his wonderful voice can add a twist to any cheesy tune. Anyway, both Malice Mizer and Gackt are releasing a live DVD this week. I'm curious to see what will be more impressive: Gackt without Malice Mizer or Malice Mizer without Gackt. I still hope they get back together again someday.

More goth-rock from Plastic Tree. Well, visually anyway. Plastic Tree are releasing a clip collection called "Nijigen Orgel". Four clips among which are the singles "Slide" and "Rocket".

And last but not least a clip collection from the Pizzicato 5. They're still hip that is, if you can call their retro sound still hip. Well, they have fans worldwide so this will be pleasing to most of you. This collection, titled "Readymade TV Vol.3" will contain clips from "Playboy, Playgirl", "Tokyo no Gashou" and their current single "Juunigatsu nijuuyokka" which will be released on the same day.

That's it for this week. Feel free to add other releases to this list in a reply to this message.
 

Twisted

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Another week, another list..."

After the mega-amount of releases from last week, this week is a bit more quiet, but there are still some worthwhile items to pick up.
First of all there's the best of album from Seiko Matsuda celebrating her 20th anniversary since her debut. She will also release the single "The Sound of Fire" this week, which is a duet with Hiromi Go and it's not included on the said album.

Glay are releasing their second compilation album which is a 2-CD set with practically all their singles they have released so far.

Japanese hip hop... Took me a little while getting used to at first, but these days you can't tell them apart from US-based rappers. Dragon Ash is one of the best hip-hop bands in Japan and that's mainly because they don't just rap. They also play guitar which results in cool punk-rock songs. Their new single is called "Lily's e.p.".

Japanese artists keep trying to sing in English. Can anyone tell me why? The whole world sings in English already. Most of the artists shouldn't even bother anyway, because their English just isn't good enough. Japanese sounds so much better anyway. Well, this time Siam Shade are giving it a try. They've recorded 5 of their songs in English and pressed it on the creatively titled mini-album "Siam Shade 7". Given Hideki's previous attempts in to sing in English, i doubt this will catch on outside of Japan (which is probably their intention). I'd rather see them release an instrumental album because this band has really great guitarplayers.

Speaking of great guitarplayers... Tomoyasu Hotei is making us cry with joy with his new album. He made us wait 2 years since his last album "Supersonic Generation" but it was well worth it. This one is called "Fetish" and it's out now. Hurray!!
 
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a thought

Concerning your nonchalant remark about why Japanese artists SHOULDN'T even bother singing in English, I beg to differ.
I don't know what your background is so I can't be too harsh in my judgement about you. But I would strongly encourage any foreign band, whose primary language isn't English, to try singing/writing songs in English in order to be universally understood and become internationally popular as well as localized. Because if they can become famous in influential countries like the US and the UK, whose music scenes are generally popular and imitated, then they stand a good chance in being recognized all over the world, too.

I like B'z and I would never discourage Inaba from writing songs with English lyrics. I wish they would release some of their English songs in the US so they can gain some overseas media attention, but it's their choice if they don't want to.

A lot of Asian (Japanese included) artists tend to imitate American or other Western countries' music and culture. I know this and you should know this, too, because you and I are Asian. The Spanish have their own style-salsa, merengue, latin music, which I would say sounds great only in Spanish. But at least when their stars crossover, they try to sing in English, too (look at Miami Sound Machine).

Asians don't have a great original sound unless they are imitating a foreign artist -your beloved Hikaru Utada and her Mariah Carey imitation fame like my beloved B'z and their current Rage Against the Machine stint- and that's why I believe their songs would sound great in English, too. If you want a true Japanese sound, go for ENKA. That has no Western/American influence in it. Granted that some songs sound great in Japanese, especially songs that were originally written in Japanese, but B'z have proved to me that language is not a barrier. They have made English versions out of their own Japanese songs which DO sound great. As long as you have a good knowledge of the English language and can translate your poetry articulately, I don't think there's going to be any problem.

Please feel free to argue with me. I wouldn't make such careless remarks about the English language because it's gotten me further anywhere in the world than my own native tongue.

-LN
 

Twisted

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I totally agree with you, with one reservation: If an artist attempts to sing in English with the intention to gain oversees airplay (and sales for that matter), then that artist should have a perfect pronouncation of the English language.
If they don't, then they won't be taken seriously. A band that would break all salesrecords in Japan, will be reduced to a bunch of amateurs anywhere else in the world, just because the English skills of the singer aren't up to par. It's the first thing people notice when they listen to Japanese music.

Indeed, language is not a barrier, but in my experience with the general public, i have noticed that people aren't as open minded about other languages as they should be. If it's not in English, then, sadly, it's easily discarded.

If the target is a Japanese audience, then there is no problem with less then perfect English. Practice makes perfect and then perhaps one day an artist will be ready for an international breakthrough.

A band like B'z can really make it big abroad, granted they will get a good marketing package. Because marketing is usually the problem with most Japanese recordcompanies. For some reason they can't get the much needed support from their offices in the US or Europe.
Marketing a Japanese artist in the US is a bit tricky though. Apparently, many Americans still hold a grudge against Japan, because of the second world war. This lives even among the youth who weren't even born back then.

Popular music sounds the same worldwide. I think that imitating prejudice is a thing of the past. What you refer to as Western/American style music has become a template of commercial popular music for artists all over the world.

Which leaves me to say that i do not want to discourage anyone to learn the English language. Especially in a time of recession it will increase your marketvalue when you are looking for a job.


Peter Zoon

P.S. how many Americans outthere have heard of Nikky Monroe a.k.a. Yuki Kobayashi? Has she made it big yet or is she the next Japanese victim of bad marketing?
 
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Well, practice makes perfect and I also think that these Japanese artists should hang around English-speaking people more, keekeekee. You know, one would think that since they have the money, they can pay for English lessons. But since the Japanese always have this excuse, "Oh, we don't need to speak English in Japan", they don't bother to learn proper English. But it's so ironic when they even try to put English in their lyrics. And they never really display any ambition to make it big in other countries save for a few bands. The first thing my Japanese friends usually say to me when I tell them I like Japanese music bands, like B'z, is, "How did you know about them?" They definitely don't expect you to know.

-LN
 
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I used to wonder why a lot of Japanese (and other Asian artists) drop in a word or two of English in their songs, but then came to two reasonable conclusions...

1. So that they can give the song an English title... hence making it that slight bit easier to penetrate the Western market
2. So that non-Japanese speakers can sing along too!

One of my fave bands The Brilliant Green (BuriGuri) have songs sung in English. Their recent albums have around half the songs sung ENTIRELY in English. Ok, since their English isn't that perfect, the lyrics miss a few particle words which I don't mind, but woah, check out Tomoko's accent. I heard "September Rain" and it gave me the shivers :)
 

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I used to wonder why a lot of Japanese (and other Asian artists) drop in a word or two of English in their songs, but then came to two reasonable conclusions...

1. So that they can give the song an English title... hence making it that slight bit easier to penetrate the Western market
2. So that non-Japanese speakers can sing along too!
I don't entirely agree with those conclusions.
1. They can give a song an English title even if the song itself doesn't contain any English.
2. For non-Japanese speakers to sing along the songs would have to be entirely in English. Understandable English that is.

I still wonder about it as well, but i guess they do it because it's fashionable to include foreign language in a song.

One of my fave bands The Brilliant Green (BuriGuri) have songs sung in English. Their recent albums have around half the songs sung ENTIRELY in English. Ok, since their English isn't that perfect, the lyrics miss a few particle words which I don't mind, but woah, check out Tomoko's accent. I heard "September Rain" and it gave me the shivers :)
Yeah, this is a really good example of how it should be done in order to obtain a western audience. Although i don't think BuriGuri have any plans to do so.

For Japanese artists to break through in the west there is only one rule: Make sure your music is damn good and more important, be different!
That's how Cornelius and The Pizzicato Five made it. Even without English lyrics.
Mai Kuraki recently released an album in the US. I'm not aware of any salesnumbers, but my bet is that it will fail bigtime. Not because she's a Japanese artist. The album is entirely in English and her English is good enough, but it will fail simply because she's not offering anything new.
Same goes for Hikaru Utada. She recently obtained a very large budget for a US Album. If she will make it big in the US it will not be because of who she is or because of the music itself. The market is already saturated with artists like her. If she makes it big it will be a very clever marketing trick. And that's probably where her Million-dollar budget will go. Straight into marketing. Which is a damn shame because she deserves much better then that.

Peter
 
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Hi

When I said "1. So that they can give the song an English title... hence making it that slight bit easier to penetrate the Western market ," I meant to say that songs have some English in it, but I noticed the trend is to just drop a few English words in the song, and of course these words would feature in the chorus, hence making it plausible for use in the song's title. Giving it an English titles makes it more pick-up-able for Western influenced buyers. The Brilliant Green go the step further by singing songs completely in English, but they are 60s rock/grunge/brit-rock influenced which is not a common formula in Japan; so I think they'd be content with not making it internationally

When I said "2. So that non-Japanese speakers can sing along too! " I didn't actually mean the whole song. Sorry if that wasn't clear, but if the chorus or a word in the chorus is in English, It makes it just that bit more trendy in Japan, maybe because it's trendy to know English over there. If a few words in the song are in English, I find myself singing those out much louder and humming the melody for the rest of the song. It just gives us non-Japanese speakers something to sing along to as well (especially when seeing them live, which I would do in a heartbeat if they'd ever play over here)

I don't really disagree with anything you've just said, it's just perhaps I wasn't specific in my response. Totally agree with you about the "For Japanese artists to break through in the west there is only one rule: Make sure your music is damn good and more important, be different!" line. Again, you gave some great examples. I think since a lot of Japanese hip hop came about pretty much because of US hip hop and rap (e.g. Heartsdales) their music is sounding extremely American recently. This would give them that edge in breaking it in the west, but definitely not on a major scale. The music will only be appreciated by a minority. This is orf course due to the language barrier

However, having said that, I can't remember the name of the label, but I think it's called Action Records in Japan with a lot of drum and bass and hip hop/experimental acts on its label... they caught the attention of a famous DJ in the west called James Lavelle (co-founder of the band Unkle) who starting a new company called West Action Records, which would make the music more accessible in the west. A lot of this music is still underground I think, and confined to small clubs and venues. Unkle are a cool band, and get a lot of help from Japanese artists/producers, which gave rise to lots of other cool pop-stuff such as Mo Wax Records and of course A Bathing Ape clothing

Cornelius is a very trendy band and much loved amongst the alternative crowds and although the vocals are in Japanese, I am not even sure if people try to understand what is being said/sung since the vocals are usually very muffled or distorted... acting merely as a backing instrument in the song. People are leaning towards a lot of experimental music lately (even big bands like Radiohead are giving it a real go) and I think that if foreign bands want to make it, as you say, they will have to be damn good and different. They probably have a better chance in the experimental/alternative genre because it will be different straight away, so they would just have to work on being good. My Japanese isn't great, but I am going to write a song in English with Japanese words (maybe a chorus if I am really ambitious) as a reciprocal and see how peeps like it. This reverse method may work well if I provide a catchy bassline and plenty of looped samples :)
 

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If a few words in the song are in English, I find myself singing those out much louder and humming the melody for the rest of the song.
Yeah, I know what you mean. You should hear my version of L'Arc~en~Ciel's "Kasou". :D

I think since a lot of Japanese hip hop came about pretty much because of US hip hop and rap (e.g. Heartsdales) their music is sounding extremely American recently. This would give them that edge in breaking it in the west, but definitely not on a major scale. The music will only be appreciated by a minority. This is of course due to the language barrier
Indeed, The first time i heard Heartsdales, i had to double-check whether they were really Japanese. Then I found out they were produced by Verbal (from M-Flo) and it all made sense to me.
But imagine they were an American act. Would they still stand out? Because that, i think, is the whole point with most of us, Jpop fans. We're very prejudiced. We think it's brilliant because it sounds so "Western". The rest of the world doesn't share that prejudice. They just see it as another act on the block. That also goes for the record-companies. Why would they invest into an artist all the way from Japan, if they can find the same around the corner.

...James Lavelle (co-founder of the band Unkle) who starting a new company called West Action Records, which would make the music more accessible in the west. A lot of this music is still underground I think, and confined to small clubs and venues.
Right, on one side this is a good thing because it draws attention to Japanese artists, on the other hand, does that music need to be made more accessible? Dont we, as true Jpop fans, want the music to be pure Japanese?

My Japanese isn't great, but I am going to write a song in English with Japanese words (maybe a chorus if I am really ambitious) as a reciprocal and see how peeps like it. This reverse method may work well if I provide a catchy bassline and plenty of looped samples :)
That's interesting. I'm walking around with the same idea. Has something like this ever been done before? Send me a demo when you have one. :D

Peter
 
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"James Lavelle (co-founder of the band Unkle) who starting a new company called West Action Records, which would make the music more accessible in the west. A lot of this music is still underground I think, and confined to small clubs and venues"

-- D'oh, I must have been out of it when I wrote that. Look at that bad grammar! Point and laugh, kids. What I was trying to say there was that James Lavelle started up a new side project to his current record company and called it "West Action Records," which released the original Japanese songs from "Action Records." I will have to check this with my die-hard JL fan, but I think that is what he did

"That's interesting. I'm walking around with the same idea. Has something like this ever been done before? Send me a demo when you have one."

-- Hmmm, I can't think of any song that matches that description. I'd say Cornelius is pretty close at times, but if there is any English in the song, it seems to just be in the chorus. I'll give it a shot when I have time (I want to make it a good'un). I'll probably use "aishiteru" in the chorus... is that a bad idea (everyone going around saying it)?
 

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What I was trying to say there was that James Lavelle started up a new side project to his current record company and called it "West Action Records," which released the original Japanese songs from "Action Records."
So he's releasing the work of Japanese artists in the US and Europe? Do you have any names or a website about this?

Hmmm, I can't think of any song that matches that description. I'd say Cornelius is pretty close at times, but if there is any English in the song, it seems to just be in the chorus.
Actually, i was wondering if any non-Japanese artist has ever released a song with Japanese lyrics in Japan. I wonder how people would react to that.
Oh, and don't worry about the lyrics. They don't have to make sense. Denki Groove is living proof of that.

Peter
 
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Hi All,
this is really interesting topic to debate because I keep thinking just about this whenever I hear a J-Pop song.

I think everyone would agree that the Japanese, especially all youngsters, imitate the Westerners in everything, right from things like getting blonde to including English in songs.
Just look at the number of katakanas beings added to the language everyday, though they may be entirely unnecessary.
Crazy?Well, but thats the way it is. No wonder japanese singers as well try to "catch up" thru their lyrics.

I guess its just this factor which pops up as many-a-time ungrammatical meaingless English phrases in what might otherwise be a decent song to listen to.

Its really funny that talented bands like say, Misuchiru . sing a lovely song in Japanese and botch it all up with "what-the-hell-could-that-mean" sentence in English.

Now, dont tell me they are going to penetrate foriegn music markets!! If songs like "macarena" (los del rio) or spanish songs were huge hits, its purely because of the fact that the songs were just good and enjoyable and not because they peppered their songs with English.

And picking English phrases from J-Pop songs is,I believe, not going to learn/motivate people learn English.It requires something on a much bigger scale.Worse, it could teach wrong English!!!

As long as the English fits in the song(not forced in) and the singer sings it properly and it makes sense,I think its fine.

I love Oda Kazumasa`s songs, and sometimes I even like his usage of English in between. ;-)

But one sad part about this all-Western stuff is it has given rise to loads of no-good bands who can`t comprehend what quality of music could mean and just sing "i loves you" , "your heart is love" (phrases I am sure must have appeared in many J-Pop songs).

The greats of music in US and UK music have disappeared (say Eric Clapton, Pink Floyd,Deep purple,Eagles) almost completely (save a few like Aerosmith,Joe Satriani) and given rise to all-crap singers like britney spears,marc antony etc etc etc.

and worse J-Pop follows suit.

I hope there comes a time when quality singers/bands like Oda Kazumasa, Miyuki Nakajima, Alice appear and displace the britney spears-equivalents. (and they are quality not because they dont use English in their songs, but coz they r plain good)

And boy, what could "do as infinity" possibly mean...............just plain crazy (though I dunno about their music)

And songs with only Japanese lyrics???I guess you need to go back to as far as Yakushimaru Hiroko

I welcome ppl to argue with me regarding this coz I feel strongly about this.

Kinjo

PS: No offence meant to anyone, these comments just mark my personal views.
 
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Peter, I'll have a look around for a website detailing this. I am not even sure if I have got the record company's name right. I've actually got this information in a magazine somewhere and I can't find it as of yet. More when that's found!

Kinjo, thanks for your post. I do agree with what you're saying there... I think western culture is a big influence on cosmopolitan cities like Tokyo, and their propagation throughout the rest of the country would spread like wildfire. I am not totally sure if the hair-bleaching is associated with western culture though. It's hard to say, but I think people were going blue, pink and red just about the same time they were going blonde

It does seem lately that successful artists are doing so well because of a certain hook or gimick. I actually miss some of the greats as you say, and didn't realise Joe Satriani was still very popular. I used to listen to him a lot but I guess he maintains popularity because he gives guitar lessons to the famous (i.e. Hammett in Metallica, etc). But then again, some of the guys you named are pretty old now and I don't think they wanna be rockers forever :)

"Do As Infinity." I actually really like that name. Pretty easy to understand what they're saying if you compare it to everyday usage of terms like "Do as Fred" or "Do as Tomiko." I would interpret "Do As Infinity" as asking you to do what infinity does. What does infinity do? That's open to personal interpretation, but whatever it is, it's done forever. Pretty cool name I think, and their music is pretty catchy (I'm biased because they're possibly my fave J-band)

Tom (As Infinity)
 

Twisted

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Actually, the name "Do As Infinity" is an acronym of the name of the band's creator, which is Dai Nagao.
Geddit? DAI <--> Do As Infinity
I guess it's pretty safe to say it doesn't mean anything. At least not anything obvious.:D

As for the music: It's not true that good music is disappearing. It's just that most radiostations stop playing music like that and only focus on what Kinjo refers to as "crap singers" because the recordcompanies want them to do so. That's simple commerce.

A recordcompany promotes an Britney Spears (through heavy advertising and tv-commercials), the braindead public then has the impression that it's cool to listen to Britney Spears. So then the radiostations start playing Britney Spears because they want to have as many listeners as possible. That way they can sell more commercials on their station...
Well, it's not that black & white, but you know what i mean.

Good music is still being made, even if it doesn't come from legendary names and you can still listen to it if you change that radio-dial once in a while. And there are also a lot of good internet-radiostations which make you forget that Britney Spears ever lived.

Oh, and poor Britney was just an example here, just in case i stepped on anybody's toes. No harm intended. :thumbsup:

Peter
 
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OK I admit up-front that I had to skim through this thread since I got work.

Using B'z as an example is not fair - since they are about the only group that could be a success in the States. My buddy Yoshi and I had this chat over and over ...

The others would probably never make it ... even Hikaru Utada. Although, Misia might be able to.

The recording industry is more interested in producing IDOLS not singers. Singers who can appear on "baraiety" shows and in posters.

Also, let's not forget that music being sold in Japan is for CD's and karaoke not for Radio. I live in Sapporo which has a head count of 1.9 million and 3 Fm stations.

There was 1 duet group of 2 New Zealanders I believe I've seen once on TV and that was it. Gaijin singing Japanese will never take off I bet. Unless, Sien takes a shot at it. Being to Japanese for a Gaijin isn't a good suggestion for making it.

ahh well. let's see were the rock falls on this one.
 

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Also, let's not forget that music being sold in Japan is for CD's and karaoke not for Radio. I live in Sapporo which has a head count of 1.9 million and 3 Fm stations.
Yeah, what's with Japanese radio, anyway? Even Tokyo doesn't have many radiostations. Let alone musicstations. You'd say that there would be a big market for hitradio-stations.
 
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yeah it's really strange ... you buy a car radio with 100 presets and barely file up the first 6. (I think the presets are meant for the Americans and not for use in Japan).

I used to have the surround cities even preset.

Seriously though, I think it might have to do with the federal regulations or something .... real bummer if you ask me.

warning ::: don't expect ot find your all enka station anywhere in the near future.
 
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Greetings!

Sorry if I'm revisiting an old topic that no one's interested in discussing any more, but I'm new here... so please indulge me...
:p

I don't know where I heard it, but I always understood that J-Pop artists would put various words or phrases in English in order to place some sort of emphasis on that word or phrase. When an idea is expressed in English in a mostly Japanese song, it does tend to stand apart from the rest of the lyrics... an effect which may be even more pronounced for listeners like myself, who only understand a little Japanese while being a native English speaker.

The world of m-flo and Heartsdales is beyond my understanding... they seem to flow between Japanese and English so fluidly that it's almost like a language unto itself.

Of course, I could be wrong in all my assumptions, which is partially why I'm posting this... :relief:

Welp, thanks for listening!
 

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Actually, i've stopped wondering about this. I just take it as it is. If the composition and arrangement is good, then it doesn't matter which language it's in.
I'm allways approaching music for the music. Lyrics are secondary, which is obvious if you don't understand Japanese like me.
One day, when i finally have the time, i will learn Japanese and it will open up a whole new world for me.
 
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Just remembered the song "Mr. Roboto" it had a Japanese chorus.
"domo arigatou misuta- roboto, domo"

The Engrish in the lyrics are mostly their to mix into the song and to add a touch of coolness. Recently though, many young high school groups are against this English usage and have turned to French instead. lololo .. same difference
 
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I would love to read more interesting releases!!! so Twisted or Kinsao, or anyone else. update us with new album's or/and singles!!!
 

Kinsao

Horizon Rider
Joined
May 8, 2005
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Why pick on me?! :eek: :D

Actually, I keep a similar thread on a Jmusic forum - a 'forthcoming albums' thread. :hihi:

I'm not totally up to date though, because I've been a bit busy recently... but I'll see what I can find! :p

I actually don't know of anything releasing this very week. :sorry:
Penicillin-nano released their first full album, Unborn Child's Dream, on August 18.

JaME website is good for forthcoming releases --> (click)
 
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