What's new

So you need to live on your own here in Japan

musicisgood

Sempai
Donor
Joined
Sep 4, 2015
Messages
548
Ratings
53
This thread is get advise on what to do to live on your own here in Japan.
A little background here first. I have a resident card that basically says I can live and work in Japan forever as long as I obey the laws of the land.
Fast forward now.
I'm soon to be starting from scratch on living on my own. My Japanese language skill is really that of a beginner with about 30 days of down to hard studying.
I'm interested in govt. housing.
I have no idea what to do, but...

This is what I've done so far. 9-1-16
I visited the housing authority at the shiyakushou.
They found me an apartment way out in the boonies that no one wanted for the August lottery.
I filled out the necessary paper work and they will call me in 2 weeks for another interview or whatever.

So, even if this pans out, I still need to know how and what to do to move in.
The only thing that I have right now is one of them flip-flop telephones which the telephone number can be disconnected at anytime. I don't own the number.

OK, guys and gals, put yourself in my shoes and share your knowledge please.

By the way I was told I need 3 months deposit. Also they said I don't need 3 refferals, maybe because I'm a foreigner.

Thanks guys.
 

mdchachi

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Mar 6, 2003
Messages
2,517
Ratings
1 239
If I were in your shoes I would try to cultivate friendships with bilingual people who can help me with living advice. Act as intermediary, making phone calls etc.
People here can help you but certainly it's not as effective.
 
Joined
Oct 12, 2013
Messages
1,508
Ratings
294
Go back to the shiyakusho and ask if there are any Japanese courses being offered.
What are your interests? If you have any hobbies, seek out people with similar interests so you can start getting a bit more integrated into the community. Martial arts? Painting? Car clubs? Sports? You are only alone if you choose to be alone. Its good to get integrated into the community (even the expat community if there is one) just so you can share information and start building a support network. You obviously have access to the internet since you are posting here, so get your search engine mojo working and start finding out what there is in your community that might interest you. Getting employed is a great way to start getting integrated - are you permanently retired? I think I read where you were recently single and thinking about where to live the rest of your days, but I wasn't sure if you were retired or if you were able/willing to get back to work somewhere.
 

musicisgood

Sempai
Donor
Joined
Sep 4, 2015
Messages
548
Ratings
53
Go back to the shiyakusho and ask if there are any Japanese courses being offered.
What are your interests? If you have any hobbies, seek out people with similar interests so you can start getting a bit more integrated into the community. Martial arts? Painting? Car clubs? Sports? You are only alone if you choose to be alone. Its good to get integrated into the community (even the expat community if there is one) just so you can share information and start building a support network. You obviously have access to the internet since you are posting here, so get your search engine mojo working and start finding out what there is in your community that might interest you. Getting employed is a great way to start getting integrated - are you permanently retired? I think I read where you were recently single and thinking about where to live the rest of your days, but I wasn't sure if you were retired or if you were able/willing to get back to work somewhere.
Hi Majestic
I'm retired and on SS now. It's not much but if I moved back to the States it may even be tougher for me, that's why I really would like to stay here. I can legally, so why not. I've paid into everything here all these years that was required.
The place where they have the apartment is really out in the boonies, (it's fairly new also) but even then I might find opportunity there.
Could make home calls and or try to make something work within the neighborhood community center and hold English conversation classes or even teach beginner guitar to children. I'm not one for sitting around and staying idle. Money is a big problem and of course the language, which I'm hitting the books daily now. This place is west of Shimonoseki near Tsunoshima, the famous bridge. It's mostly small fishing villages dotted along the coastline. Right now I have to wait and see the outcome of the interview. I'm trying and they are trying to find out if the city will waive the deposit and give a discount on the rent which is 23400 yen a month.
Your suggestions are most welcome.
Thank you again.
 

Mike Cash

骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう
Joined
Mar 15, 2002
Messages
16,454
Ratings
1,568
While you're waiting to hear from the public housing, go check out those MUCH cheaper alternatives I searched up for you. You could easily eat a week or two on the difference in the rent.

Do you have any of the basic necessities for setting up housekeeping? Fridge, stove, pots and pans, rice cooker, dishes, towels, bedding, clothes pins, spatula, ladle, washing machine, can opener, scissors, soap, detergent, light fixtures, curtains, etc. ?

Are you aware that rental properties typically don't come with ceiling light fixtures and that you're expected to provide your own? Same for curtains.

Do you know where the second-hand/recycle shops are in your area? Those are going to be your most economical source for your things like fridge, washing machine, and other such items. Most of them will deliver large stuff for free if it isn't too far from the store, so hit up shops near where you move.

The quality isn't always great, but if I were in your shoes I would buy all my dishes and kitchen utensils at Daiso. Their stuff is more than good enough for bachelor housekeeping.
 
Top