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Researching the Ainu people

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Mar 15, 2015
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Hi , I have been researching the Ainu people that are later ancestors of the jomon the non asian people that were in the Nippon islands 11,000 years before the yayoi or Japanese people . I found the Ainu languge has many words that are the same as Basque so i think they later became the basque people in europe ? They think Jomon people came from the Russian stepps 17,000 years ago ? I was amazed to learn they ate raw salmon called ruibe that was frozen and then thinly sliced and used wasabi to preserve
So the Ainu people showed the Japanese sashimi so cool !. Other Ainu
Contributions to Japanese culture are red and black lacquare wood bowls , buckwheat soba noodles ,
Eating whale , the Ainu invented the harpoons the Japanese still use ,the oldest know ceramic pots were made by the Jomon people Ainu ancestors . The ainu were the first people to make hot pot with fish or other meat and vegetables, they ate sea urchins , and blow fish that make your lips tingle . Don't forget the Samuri
Or exhaulted warriors they were Aniu !
 
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THE SAMURAI AND THE AINU

Findings by American anthropologist C. Loring Brace, University of Michigan, will surely be controversial in race conscious Japan. The eye of the predicted storm will be the Ainu, a "racially different" group of some 18,000 people now living on the northern island of Hokkaido. Pure-blooded Ainu are easy to spot: they have lighter skin, more body hair, and higher-bridged noses than most Japanese. Most Japanese tend to look down on the Ainu.

Brace has studied the skeletons of about 1,100 Japanese, Ainu, and other Asian ethnic groups and has concluded that the revered samurai of Japan are actually descendants of the Ainu, not of the Yayoi from whom most modern Japanese are descended. In fact, Brace threw more fuel on the fire with:

"Dr. Brace said this interpretation also explains why the facial features of the Japanese ruling class are so often unlike those of typical modern Japanese. The Ainu-related samurai achieved such power and prestige in medieval Japan that they intermarried with royality and nobility, passing on Jomon-Ainu blood in the upper classes, while other Japanese were primarily descended from the Yoyoi." The reactions of Japanese scientists have been muted so. One Japanese anthropologist did say to Brace," I hope you are wrong."
The Samurai And The Ainu
* Anthropologist C. Loring Brace believe the Ainu were the early nobility and Samurai.

* Anthropologist Marvin Harris believes the Japanese custom of 'white-face' was an emulation of these early noblemen.
 
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Ainu contributions to Japanese besides
Sashimi , wasabi, soba , lacquer bowls, hot pot is eating seaweed


Kombu or konbu ( _ja. 昆布 IPA2|kombɯ), also called "dashima" ( _ko.다시마 "dasima"), or "haidai" (zh-tsp|t=海帶|s=海带|p=Hǎidài), are ediblekelp from the genus "Laminaria" widely eaten in East Asia.

Over 90 percent of Japanese kombu is cultivated, and most isharvested, in Hokkaidō. It is cultivated as far south as the Seto InlandSea.

History

The earliest written record of kombu appeared in Shoku Nihongi in 797as a gift and tax from the Tōhoku Region. Its actual use is believed to bemuch earlier, most likely dating back to the Jōmon and Ainu period, but as iteasily decomposes, no archaeological evidence can be found. Duringthe Muromachi period, a newly developed drying technique allowedkombu to be stored for more than a few days and kombu became animportant export from the Tohoku area Fact|date=March 2008. By the Edoperiod, as Hokkaidō was colonized and shipment routes wereorganized, the use of kombu became widespread throughout Japan.Traditional Okinawan cuisine relies heavily on kombu as a part of thediet; this practice began in the Edo period. In Okinawa, theconsumption of kombu per household is the highest of all prefectures.In the 20th century, a way to cultivate kombu was discovered andkombu became cheap and readily available everywhere.

In 1867 the word "kombu" first appeared in an English-languagepublication - "A Japanese and English Dictionary," by James C.Hepburn.

Starting in the 1960s, the word "kombu" started to be used widely inthe United States, and the product (imported in dried form from Japan)became widely avaialable at natural food stores and Asian-Americangrocery stores, due to the influence of the macrobiotic movement, andin the 1970s with the growing number of Japanese restaurants andsushi bars.
 

Mike Cash

骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう
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Please don't:

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3. Copy-paste large blocks of text without accrediting the source.
 
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THE SAMURAI AND THE AINU

Findings by American anthropologist C. Loring Brace, University of Michigan, will surely be controversial in race conscious Japan. The eye of the predicted storm will be the Ainu, a "racially different" group of some 18,000 people now living on the northern island of Hokkaido. Pure-blooded Ainu are easy to spot: they have lighter skin, more body hair, and higher-bridged noses than most Japanese. Most Japanese tend to look down on the Ainu.

Brace has studied the skeletons of about 1,100 Japanese, Ainu, and other Asian ethnic groups and has concluded that the revered samurai of Japan are actually descendants of the Ainu, not of the Yayoi from whom most modern Japanese are descended. In fact, Brace threw more fuel on the fire with:

"Dr. Brace said this interpretation also explains why the facial features of the Japanese ruling class are so often unlike those of typical modern Japanese. The Ainu-related samurai achieved such power and prestige in medieval Japan that they intermarried with royality and nobility, passing on Jomon-Ainu blood in the upper classes, while other Japanese were primarily descended from the Yoyoi." The reactions of Japanese scientists have been muted so. One Japanese anthropologist did say to Brace," I hope you are wrong."
The Samurai And The Ainu
* Anthropologist C. Loring Brace believe the Ainu were the early nobility and Samurai.

* Anthropologist Marvin Harris believes the Japanese custom of 'white-face' was an emulation of these early noblemen.

Sounds like a bullshit pseudo-theory to me. Emperor hirohito looks more Yayoi than an eskimo. What about his grandfathers and pictures of his great great great grandfathers, including all the princess and queens? they all look Yayoi. All the pictures look Yayoi.

And since when did Japanese invented harpoon? the oldest to date came from Siberian nomads





Also, how can anyone claim the revered samurai were Ainu? Samurai started only in the 7th century. And Ainu have lived in Hokkaido Japan for 11,000 years.

ORIGIN OF SAMURAI

Following the Battle of Hakusukinoe against Tang China and Silla in 663 AD that led to a Japanese retreat from Korean affairs, Japan underwent widespread reform. One of the most important was that of the Taika Reform, issued by Prince Naka no Ōe (Emperor Tenji) in 646 AD. This edict allowed the Japanese aristocracy to adopt the Tang dynasty political structure,bureaucracy, culture, religion, and philosophy.[3] As part of the Taihō Code, of 702 AD, and the later Yōrō Code,[4] the population was required to report regularly for census, a precursor for national conscription. With an understanding of how the population was distributed, Emperor Mommu introduced a law whereby

I seriously doubt a race of Ainu people became the early nobility and Samurai of Japan yet they were enslaved for 1100 years by the invading Japanese.

 
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