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Please check my sentences

hirashin

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Dear native English speakers,

Would you check my sentences?
①What do you like about Britain?

②Today, we are going to study about British history.

③Recently, an interesting article about Japan appeared in the British newspaper the Guardian.

④What's your views on global warming? (地球温暖化) (on~=~に関して/関する)

⑤The south of the country grows richer, while the north grows poorer. (だんだん~になる)

⑥I respect my parents. They have been helping a lot of poor people in Africa.

⑦Most Japanese people have a low opinion of their own country, while many people outside Japan have more favorable views about it.

⑧I found the key at the bottom of my bag.

⑨Those people seem to have been speaking German.

⑩In 2015, the survey was carried out in 10 countries in Asia.

Thanks in advance.
Hirashin
 
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②Today, we are going to study about British history.
> Today, we are going to study British history.

You can conduct a study about something.
You can study about a thousand kanji.

Usually (as a verb), study is transitive, followed by a direct object. If it is a noun (my first example), then about is okay (or more acceptable). Second example, about is synonymous with approximately. (adverbial)

I think I've heard ② enough, that I wouldn't want to test it without having taught it--TOEIC/eiken should not be asking for a right/wrong decision on this. (maybe I've been in Japan too long?!?!?)

Study and learn are different verbs--you can (very acceptably) say "we learned about British history", but that does not make study about okay.
 
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hirashin

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Would either "Today, we are going to learn about British history" or "Today, we are going to study British history" be correct?
 
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Probably confusing, but learn can sometimes be used in a way that is analogous to study: (synonymously)

...back when I was learning British history...
...back when I was learning (how to play) guitar...

Also, read: (vs study and learn)
I've read Shakespeare.
I've read about Shakespeare.
...both okay, but different meanings.
 

hirashin

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(a)Today, we are going to learn about British history.
(b)Today, we are going to study British history.

Would there be any difference in meaning between them?
 

mdchachi

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(a)Today, we are going to learn about British history.
(b)Today, we are going to study British history.

Would there be any difference in meaning between them?
Just minor nuance. (a) sounds passive. Like you will be listening to a teacher or watching a video. (b) sounds active like there might be some student activities like reading. But basically no difference.
 
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