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Goodriddance

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歩き出した君の音が僕の中で響きだして
見つけたのは君が夜に隠したもの 秘密の歌

The above is the first part is of fourth by to from ling toshite shigeru. I'm struggling to understand how to parse sentences in situations like this.

My understanding is that sentences should end with verbs and therefore expect i should be able to base it off of that but I don't know if I'm missing something because of poetic license. I can see multiple が in there so i expect there must be at least 2 main sentences. After looking at a translation i think everything before the もの on the second line is effectively a full sentence which would make sense given it ends with a conjugated verb at that point.

Do singers generally play fast and loose with grammar rules in Japanese music?
Is there an easy way to identify sub clauses?
 

lanthas

 
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I marked the subclauses with parentheses and split the two lines into separate sentences for easier reading. See if you understand them now:

(歩き出した君の)音が僕の中で響きだした。
見つけたのは(君が夜に隠した)もの: 秘密の歌。

(Try reading without the subclauses first, then adding them back)

Language is flexible. An English sentence can end with a preposition, and a Japanese sentence can end with something other than a verb.
 

Mike Cash

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The above is the first part is of fourth by to from ling toshite shigeru. I'm struggling to understand how to parse sentences in situations like this.
I'm struggling to parse your first sentence. Everything after "the above is" sounds like gibberish.

Do singers generally play fast and loose with grammar rules in Japanese music?
Probably nowhere near as much as happens in English songs.

Is there an easy way to identify sub clauses?
More study. More exposure.
 

Toritoribe

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The band name is Ling tosite sigure, not ling toshite shigeru. Sigure/Shigure means "drizzling rain/raining off and on", whereas shigeru is "(plants) to grow ."
Ling Tosite Sigure - Wikipedia

In addition to lanthas-san's explanation, the -te form indicates the reason/cause of the main clause there.
The core of the sentence is 見つけたのは隠したもの(だ), i.e., the copula is omitted at the end of the sentence. 隠したもの and 秘密の歌 are in apposition.
 

Goodriddance

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Thanks everyone, sorry the message was a bit all over the place. Looks like my phone's auto correct was doing some interesting things :|

Currently when I attempt to translate sentences I break it up by particles like below with | characters:

歩き出した | 君の音が | 僕の中で | 響きだして |
見つけたのは | 君が | 夜に | 隠した | もの |秘密の歌

Then look up anything I don't know before trying to reason out what it means. This works fine for me with simple sentences but I tend to have issues with bits like the above. My issue with this approach is that its not obvious to me why the second sentence would be split as:
見つけたのは(君が夜に隠した)もの: 秘密の歌。

Instead of:
(見つけたのは君が夜に隠した)もの: 秘密の歌。

Is it obvious?

Also, I understand how the verb is being used at the start of the second sentence because the の is converting it to a noun so the topic is the thing that was found but not sure how the first works:

歩き出した君の音が

Since there aren't any particles after it, it feels like a sentence by itself. Is it normal to do this?
 

Toritoribe

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Is it obvious?
Yes.

Also, I understand how the verb is being used at the start of the second sentence because the の is converting it to a noun so the topic is the thing that was found but not sure how the first works:

歩き出した君の音が

Since there aren't any particles after it, it feels like a sentence by itself. Is it normal to do this?
Have you already learned about the modifying/attributive clause?
 

Goodriddance

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Have you already learned about the modifying/attributive clause?
No I haven't but I'm reading about it now. Thank you for pointing me in the right direction.

I've had no formal teaching in Japanese and can't find any courses nearby to change that so I may lack knowledge of some pretty basic things. I'll study anything that people point out to me though to improve my understanding.
 

Mike Cash

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歩き出した | 君の音が | 僕の中で | 響きだして |
見つけたのは | 君が | 夜に | 隠した | もの |秘密の歌
音が響きだして
何の音が?
君の音が響きだして
何をした君?
歩き出した君
何が響きだして?
歩き出した君の音が響きだして
どこで響きだして?
僕の中で響きだして
合わせて言えば?歩きだして君の音が僕の中で響きだして

You can't just rely on breaking things up at the particles. You have to understand what info each phrase is adding. Sometimes it is easier to see if you think of what question each bit would be answering.

But I suspect the main problem is that you haven't yet learned about phrases modifying the nouns that immediately follow them.

For example, do you know the difference between:

1. 君がビールを飲んだ
2. 君が飲んだビール
3. ビールを飲んだ君
 

Mike Cash

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I've had no formal teaching in Japanese and can't find any courses nearby to change that so I may lack knowledge of some pretty basic things. I'll study anything that people point out to me though to improve my understanding.
Then I'll give you the one suggestion that people who say they'll study anything that people point out to them almost never follow: Buy a proper textbook.
 

Goodriddance

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For example, do you know the difference between:

1. 君がビールを飲んだ
2. 君が飲んだビール
3. ビールを飲んだ君
After reading an explanation on attributive verbs in Japanese I would say:
1. You drank a beer.
2. Your drunken beer. (finished drink)
3. You that has finished drinking beer.
 

Mike Cash

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After reading an explanation on attributive verbs in Japanese I would say:
1. You drank a beer.
2. Your drunken beer. (finished drink)
3. You that has finished drinking beer.
We would more naturally say, "the beer (that) you drank" in English, but you get the idea. We really don't use the phrasing of #3 all that much in English, but it is common enough in Japanese.
 
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