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Meaning of ゆって

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Hello,

My japanese is very basic. I often saw this hiragana but what does it mean : ゆって

Thank you,
 
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It's not in the dictionary. It *might* be the te-form of 揺る (to shake), but then it'd probably be written with a kanji (揺って).

Can you give an example sentence?
 
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By example :
"まるゆって何の使い道があるんだ"
or
"多分あなたに、なにをゆっても通じないし"
 
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The first is a question about a "まるゆ": "What use does a まるゆ have?" The only somewhat matching word in the dictionary is まるゆう, which is a "tax-free small-sum savings system (often used by the elderly and the disabled)". If course, without context I can't tell whether this is what was meant.

The second is probably dialect for 言って: "I guess you won't listen to/understand anything I say".
 
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Thank you but my question is more general.

Does it mean that "ゆって" has no meaning without context ?

The first is a question about a "まるゆ": "What use does a まるゆ have?" The only somewhat matching word in the dictionary is まるゆう, which is a "tax-free small-sum savings system (often used by the elderly and the disabled)". If course, without context I can't tell whether this is what was meant.

The second is probably dialect for 言って: "I guess you won't listen to/understand anything I say".
 
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In both cases, "ゆって" was not actually a word. In the first case, the ゆ is part of the word まるゆ and the って is the quotation particle. In the second, it's a misspelling of いって.

For a general meaning of ゆって where it *isn't* part of or a misspelling of a different word, see my first reply.
 

Mike Cash

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The first one is also 言って

The second is not a misspelling, but a youth writing it as it is often pronounced.

These examples are also obviously from his granddaughter's email.
 
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Thank you but my question is more general.

Does it mean that "ゆって" has no meaning without context ?
I don't know much, but I do know that very little in Japanese, especially when expressed in hiragana, has meaning without context. Or, more precisely, the meaning is ambiguous without the context.
 
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Now it's more clear for me but japanese is really not easy language.
Thank you for your teaching.

In both cases, "ゆって" was not actually a word. In the first case, the ゆ is part of the word まるゆ and the って is the quotation particle. In the second, it's a misspelling of いって.

For a general meaning of ゆって where it *isn't* part of or a misspelling of a different word, see my first reply.
 
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It's true that the meaning of japanese is ambiguous without the context but I want to raise this challenge !
Maybe in 2 years :(

I don't know much, but I do know that very little in Japanese, especially when expressed in hiragana, has meaning without context. Or, more precisely, the meaning is ambiguous without the context.
 
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No the challenge to read and write properly in Japanese.

So I could understand better my granddaugther and maybe make a new romance despite my age.

The challenge of making random chunks of Japanese written in hiragana unambiguous without context?

Good luck with that!!
 

Toritoribe

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It's just the classical form of 揺れる. No one uses it anymore.

ゆれる【揺れる】
[動ラ下一][文(= 文語)]ゆる[ラ下二
ゆれる【揺れる】の意味 - 国語辞書 - goo辞書

As in the dictionary, an intransitive verb 揺る is ラ行下二段活用動詞, so the -te form (more accurately to say, "連用形 + the particle て" in the classical grammar) is 揺れて. There is another 揺る, which is ラ行四段活用動詞 transitive verb. In this case, the -te form is 揺りて. Thus, the conjugation form 揺[ゆ]って never exists anyway even in classical Japanese.
 
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No the challenge to read and write properly in Japanese.

So I could understand better my granddaugther and maybe make a new romance despite my age.
Seems to me your time might be better spent improving the relationships already in your life. Understanding your 'grand'daughter is probably more about listening to what she says rather than reading her words.

Your responses to people here have shown an alarming lack of perspective. A hallmark of a person able to create and maintain successful relationships is the ability to see oneself through the eyes of another and take criticism with an open mind.

Perhaps Japanese isn't where your efforts should be going. There is a child in a lot of obvious emotional distress.
 
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It's just the classical form of 揺れる. No one uses it anymore.
I'm getting confused now. Jisho lists it as a bog-standard common transitive 五段 verb. Similarly, goo辞書 has the following:

[動ラ五(四)]
揺り動かす。ふるい動かす。ゆすぶる。
「背広の肩を抑えて、前後に―・りながら」〈漱石それから
(「淘る」「汰る」とも書く)水の中などで、ふるい動かして選び分ける。「砂金を―・る」
物が揺れ動く。特に、地震が起こる。
「地震が―・る度に」〈漱石吾輩は猫である
[動ラ下二]「ゆれる」の文語形
So it looks like 揺る is simultaneously: a modern transitive 五段 verb (Jisho/goo辞書 1.1 and 1.2), an intransitive 五段 verb (goo辞書 1.3), and an intransitive 下二段 verb (goo辞書 2)?
 

Toritoribe

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I checked 揺って in a corpus and got five examples that this form is used in novels. The youngest writer was born in 1935. He used 揺って in a novel published in 2005. There are two novels written in 1978 and 1989, the writers were born in 1931 and 1927 respectively, but these are 時代劇 regarding Edo period. The rest two were written in 1946 and 1940, the writers were born in 1883 and 1913, respectively.

Thus, I have to admit that I've never seen it before but 揺って is really used, or at least used to be used.:facepalm: (I know this is sour grapes, but I would use 揺すって instead of 揺って for all these five examples.:embarrased:)
 
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Glad that it's cleared up then :). It seems to be more rare than Jisho makes you think with its "common word" tag; and in the end, certainly not something that a teenage girl would use.
 

Mike Cash

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Glad that it's cleared up then :). It seems to be more rare than Jisho makes you think with its "common word" tag; and in the end, certainly not something that a teenage girl would use.
I can't help but marvel how you've gone down that rabbit hole and totally forgotten to ask about that use of まる which led you into it in the first place.
 
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I already got into the rabbit hole with idomeneo's first post, but you're right: 「まる言って」 seems ungrammatical to me, I'd at least expect a quotation particle. What does it mean? What is the まる? (probably not 丸...)
 

Mike Cash

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Probably a list of objections came beforehand. The sentence in question is s summation and the まる is similar to まとめる in meaning here. I believe it probably does stem from 丸, and is used to indicate something being all-inclusive, comprehensive in scope, complete, etc. (You can hear it with time expressions: 丸一日、丸一週間、丸一年間, etc)
 
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